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al bupp Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-25-11 04:13 PM
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Native Foster Care: Lost Children, Shattered Families

John Poole/NPR
Derrin Yellow Robe, 3, stands in his great-grandparents' backyard on the Crow Creek Reservation in South Dakota. Along with his twin sister and two older sisters, he was taken off the reservation by South Dakota's Department of Social Services in July 2009 and spent a year and a half in foster care before being returned to his family.

Overview of a three-part investigation

October 25, 2011

Nearly 700 Native American children in South Dakota are being removed from their homes every year, sometimes in questionable circumstances. An NPR News investigation has found that the state is largely failing to place them according to the law. The vast majority of native kids in foster care in South Dakota are in nonnative homes or group homes, according to an NPR analysis of state records.

Years ago, thousands of Native American children were forcibly removed from their homes and sent to boarding schools, where the motto opf the schools' founder was "Kill the Indian, Save the Man." Children lost touch with their culture, traditions and families. Many suffered horrible abuse, leaving entire generations missing from the one place whose future depended on them their tribes.

In 1978, Congress tried to put a stop to it. They passed the Indian Child Welfare Act, which says except in the rarest circumstances, Native American children must be placed with their relatives or tribes. It also says states must do everything it can to keep native families together.

But 32 states are failing to abide by the act in one way or another, and, an NPR investigation has found, nowhere is that more apparent than in South Dakota.


Read the complete first part of our yearlong investigation here.

Just heard this on NPR. It's a shattering story of modern-day state-run kidnapping of native children by Department of Social Service in South Dakota. Turns out that the federal government makes payments to the state which provide incentives for them to take children, for little or not reason, from people too poor to do much about it.
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ellisonz Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-25-11 04:35 PM
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xchrom Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-25-11 04:42 PM
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2. Recommend
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SharonAnn Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-25-11 09:12 PM
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6. It's really all about the money from the Feds for foster children programs.
The state gets money. Lots of money.

I waited to hear where the money driver was when I was listening to the article, because there had to be a big money motivator in there somewhere. And there is.
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dtexdem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-25-11 04:51 PM
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3. Racism, oppression, and genocide ...
they haven't ended, just been swept under the rug.
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glinda Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-25-11 05:31 PM
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4. Another thread on this also
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jwirr Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-25-11 06:14 PM
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5. The reservation in MN where I live has their own social services
and the only problems I have seen is when dad/mom is Native American and mom/dad is white. Then there is often a fight over which family gets the child. Also here family members are asked first if they will take the child if it must be removed from the parents. I think that works a lot better than SD.
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REACTIVATED IN CT Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-26-11 05:02 AM
Response to Reply #5
7. There doesn't seem to be any due process in SD.
What right does DSS have to come on land owned by another nation and take these children anyway ???
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jwirr Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-26-11 09:50 AM
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10. Yes, that is a very good point. In MN in order to take legal action on
reservation land there has to be a federal agent present.
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REACTIVATED IN CT Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-26-11 05:11 AM
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8. They have no right to take these children
"But two South Dakota judges, two lawyers and a dozen tribal advocates told NPR that state law doesn't apply. Federal law says tribes are sovereign. The experts say a state official can't drive off with an Indian child from Crow Creek any more than a Crow Creek official could drive off with a child from Rapid City."


http://www.npr.org/2011/10/25/141662357/incentives-and-...


I was in tears driving home when I heard how the little girl was punished for wetting her pants -she had to wear the soiled underwear on her head.
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al bupp Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-26-11 07:27 AM
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9. I agree, it's a real travesty of justice
I, too, felt strong emotions while hearing this in my car, but for me it was red-hot anger rather than tears.
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REACTIVATED IN CT Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-26-11 12:53 PM
Response to Reply #9
11. I felt anger at first then sadness when I heard about how
this child was punished.
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