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Jcrowley Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-30-06 11:44 AM
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The Global Spread of GMO Crops
The Global Spread of GMO Crops
By Peter Montague

Felix Ballarin spent 15 years of his life developing a special organically-grown variety of red corn. It would bring a high price on the market because local chicken farmers said the red color lent a rosy hue to the meat and eggs from their corn-fed chickens. But when the corn emerged from the ground last year, yellow kernels were mixed with the red. Government officials later confirmed with DNA tests that Mr. Ballarins crop had become contaminated with a genetically modified (GMO) strain of corn.

Because Mr. Ballarins crop was genetically contaminated, it no longer qualified as organically grown, so it no longer brought a premium price. Mr. Ballarins 15-year investment was destroyed overnight by what is now commonly known as genetic contamination. This is a new phenomenon, less then 10 years oldbut destined to be a permanent part of the brave new world that is being cobbled together as we speak by a handful of corporations whose goal is global domination of food. Mr. Ballarin lives in Spain, but the story is the same all over the world: genetically modified crops are invading fields close by (and some that are not so close by), contaminating both the organic food industry and the conventional (non-GMO and non-organic) food industry.

As a result of genetically contamination of non-GMO crops in Europe, the U.S., Mexico, Australia and South America, the biotech food industry had an upbeat year in 2005 and things are definitely looking good for the future. As genetically modified pollen from their crops blows around, contaminating nearby fields, objections to genetically modified crops diminish because non-GMO alternatives become harder and harder to find. A few more years of this and there may not be many (if any) truly non-GMO crops left anywhere. At that point there wont be any debate about whether to allow GMO-crops to be grown here or thereno one will have any choice. All the crops in the world will be genetically modified (except perhaps for a few grown in greenhouses on a tiny scale). At that point, GMO will have contaminated essentially the entire planet, and the companies that own the patents on the GMO seeds will be sitting in the catbird seat.

<snip>

Who benefits from all this? Think of it this way: when all crops on earth are genetically contaminated, then the seed companies that own the patented seeds will be in a good position to begin enforcing their patent rights. They have already taken a test case to court and won. In 2004, Monsanto (the St. Louis, Mo. chemical giant) won a seven-year court battle against a 73-year-old Saskatchewan farmer whose fields had been contaminated by Monsantos genetically modified plants. The Supreme Court of Canada court ruled that the farmera fellow named Percy Schmeiserowed Monsanto damages for having Monsantos patented crops growing illegally in his field.

http://www.altpr.org/modules.php?op=modload&name=Sectio...
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Karenina Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-30-06 04:18 PM
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1. Last paragraph...
Yes, it has been a good year for the GMO industry. None of the stated benefits of their products have materializedand the U.S. government regulatory system has been revealed as a shambut enormous benefits to the few GMO corporations are right on track to begin blossoming. For Monsanto, Dow and Novartis, a decent shot at gaining control over much of the worlds food supply is now blowing on the wind and theres no turning back. As the Vice-President of plant genetics for Dow Agrosciences said recently, There will be come continuing bumps in the road, but we are starting to see a balance of very good news and growth. The genie is way out of the bottle.
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