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Chinese Food Industry Hums Underground" (and we worry about Mexicans?)

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KoKo Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-19-05 06:13 PM
Original message
Chinese Food Industry Hums Underground" (and we worry about Mexicans?)
Edited on Wed Oct-19-05 06:58 PM by KoKo01
SKIP THIS AND GO TO ARTICLE IF YOUR ARE RUSHED FOR TIME!


(NOTE: this article appeared in the Raleigh, NC paper "News & Observer." I read it in my "home delivered copy.") I tried to find it online since it was fed to "N&O" from the New York Times which I'm an "online" subscriber to also. It was hell trying to search out this article. Google "Cache" let me down and so did Yahoo Search and MetaCrawler.

I'm thinking that our search engines...having become "Big Time" aren't even allowing the "cached" copies to be accessible. I found this...but you aren't going to be able to read the rest because "N&O is subscription only." Just let me tell you that "Mexican Illegals" aren't the only problem in the US. All those Chinese Restaurants and "Buffets" in every "hill and holler" of the US are using Bussed in employees who are "illegals from China" and they only know the "zip code" of where they are bussed when they come out of the Chinese Employment Agencies in NYC! This article is about a NC Chinese Restaurant Employee who goes on a bus up to NYC to get a job in SC! He had to ride a bus up North to end up BACK DOWN SOUTH because the Chinese Restaurant Industry is raking it in up there in NYC while he is an "illegal" going and working at many of the "truck stop" towns across America that advertise CHINESE FOOD. THIS IS AWFUL!

I had to give "snips" ...because it's all under "Media Lock and Key" but you can get the jist of it from these snips. "Steinbeck's "Grapes of Wrath" anyone. :eyes:



Chinese food industry hums underground
New York hub for restaurant work


By JENNIFER EIGHT LEE, The New York Times

NEW YORK -- At the beginning of every week, a steady stream of Chinese restaurant workers files into the nest of Chinatown employment agencies clustered under the Manhattan Bridge: young men with spiky hair barely out of their teens, smooth-skinned girls who still giggle about their crushes and stocky older men who left their families behind in China years ago.

The workers walk in and out, in and out, checking each of the dozens of dusty single-room agencies. They focus on the white boards and walls of Post-it notes that list the hundreds, if not thousands, of job openings available across the country each week: kitchen helpers, chefs, waitresses, telephone answerers, deliverymen who can drive, deliverymen who don't need to drive.

Among the job seekers one Monday in late September was Xue Qingxi, a 38-year-old immigrant with large, friendly eyes and a bright green T-shirt who had arrived in New York City the day before, towing his belongings in two small black rolling suitcases.

Feeling it was time for a change, he had just left his job as a cook in a Chinese restaurant in North Carolina. Where, exactly, in North Carolina, he wasn't sure.

"It's all rural," he said dismissively.

After renting a bed for the night for $15, he was wandering in and out of the employment agencies the next afternoon, looking for his next job. "I want to leave tonight," he said.

There are more than 36,000 Chinese restaurants in the United States -- more than the number of McDonald's, Wendy's and Burger King restaurants combined, says Chinese Restaurant News, an industry publication. They have popped up in exurban strip malls and on the decaying streets of former industrial centers in the Midwest: buffets, takeouts, sit-downs. And the main hub for staffing that vast network of restaurants, or at least those east of the Rocky Mountains, is at the convergence of Forsyth, Division and Eldridge streets, where the rumble of the subway can be heard overhead.

"It's remarkable how successful the Chinese have been in adapting their food to America, making it so phenomenally available," said Kenneth J. Guest, a sociology professor at Baruch College in New York, who has studied Chinese restaurant workers.

Many illegal

The vast majority of these workers are illegal and have paid tens of thousands of dollars for the privilege of being in the United States. In the Delaware-size area around Fuzhou, a southeastern city that has become China's leading exporter of restaurant workers to the United States, the going rate for being smuggled is more than $60,000, Guest said.

Chinese food industry hums underground
New York hub for restaurant work

By JENNIFER EIGHT LEE, The New York Times

NEW YORK -- At the beginning of every week, a steady stream of Chinese restaurant workers files into the nest of Chinatown employment agencies clustered under the Manhattan Bridge: young men with spiky hair barely out of their teens, smooth-skinned girls who still giggle about their crushes and stocky older men who left their families behind in China years ago.

The workers walk in and out, in and out, checking each of the dozens of dusty single-room agencies. They focus on the white boards and walls of Post-it notes that list the hundreds, if not thousands, of job openings available across the country each week: kitchen helpers, chefs, waitresses, telephone answerers, deliverymen who can drive, deliverymen who don't need to drive.

Among the job seekers one Monday in late September was Xue Qingxi, a 38-year-old immigrant with large, friendly eyes and a bright green T-shirt who had arrived in New York City the day before, towing his belongings in two small black rolling suitcases.

Feeling it was time for a change, he had just left his job as a cook in a Chinese restaurant in North Carolina. Where, exactly, in North Carolina, he wasn't sure.

"It's all rural," he said dismissively.

After renting a bed for the night for $15, he was wandering in and out of the employment agencies the next afternoon, looking for his next job. "I want to leave tonight," he said.

There are more than 36,000 Chinese restaurants in the United States -- more than the number of McDonald's, Wendy's and Burger King restaurants combined, says Chinese Restaurant News, an industry publication. They have popped up in exurban strip malls and on the decaying streets of former industrial centers in the Midwest: buffets, takeouts, sit-downs. And the main hub for staffing that vast network of restaurants, or at least those east of the Rocky Mountains, is at the convergence of Forsyth, Division and Eldridge streets, where the rumble of the subway can be heard overhead.

"It's remarkable how successful the Chinese have been in adapting their food to America, making it so phenomenally available," said Kenneth J. Guest, a sociology professor at Baruch College in New York, who has studied Chinese restaurant workers.

Many illegal

The vast majority of these workers are illegal and have paid tens of thousands of dollars for the privilege of being in the United States. In the Delaware-size area around Fuzhou, a southeastern city that has become China's leading exporter of restaurant workers to the United States, the going rate for being smuggled is more than $60,000, Guest said.
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starroute Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-19-05 08:28 PM
Response to Original message
1. "Where the rumble of the subway can be heard overhead"???
That's a nice trick. I'd like to know how they manage it.
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KoKo Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Oct-20-05 07:56 AM
Response to Reply #1
2. The office is under the tracks. This is a sad story. These folks are
brought in illegally and then shipped around America to "zipcodes" where they work 12 hours a day. I wondered how all those Chinese Restaurants were popping up in roadstop towns where the population is maybe 50 people here in NC and in other states we drive through.

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