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U.S. Federal Open Market Committee Statement: Full Text (.25 hike)

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swag Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Sep-21-04 02:19 PM
Original message
U.S. Federal Open Market Committee Statement: Full Text (.25 hike)
http://quote.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000006&sid=a...

"The Federal Open Market Committee decided today to raise its target for the federal funds rate by 25 basis points to 1 3/4 percent.

The Committee believes that, even after this action, the stance of monetary policy remains accommodative and, coupled with robust underlying growth in productivity, is providing ongoing support to economic activity. After moderating earlier this year partly in response to the substantial rise in energy prices, output growth appears to have regained some traction, and labor market conditions have improved modestly. Despite the rise in energy prices, inflation and inflation expectations have eased in recent months.

The Committee perceives the upside and downside risks to the attainment of both sustainable growth and price stability for the next few quarters to be roughly equal. With underlying inflation expected to be relatively low, the Committee believes that policy accommodation can be removed at a pace that is likely to be measured. Nonetheless, the Committee will respond to changes in economic prospects as needed to fulfill its obligation to maintain price stability.

Voting for the FOMC monetary policy action were: Alan Greenspan, Chairman; Timothy F. Geithner, Vice Chairman; Ben S. Bernanke; Susan S. Bies; Roger W. Ferguson, Jr.; Edward M. Gramlich; Thomas M. Hoenig; Donald L. Kohn; Cathy E. Minehan; Mark W. Olson; Sandra Pianalto; and William Poole."

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swag Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Sep-21-04 02:20 PM
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1. More of Greenspan's "soft patch" optimism (delusion?)
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Merlin Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Sep-21-04 02:25 PM
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2. Also upped the Discount rate by 25 bp to 2-3/4%
Does anyone know of a good primer on the difference between the Fed Funds rate and the Discount rate ?
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swag Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Sep-21-04 02:45 PM
Response to Reply #2
3. Here ya go:
Edited on Tue Sep-21-04 02:46 PM by swag
http://www.frbsf.org/publications/federalreserve/moneta...

on edit, some text:

What is the federal funds market?

From day to day, the amount of reserves a bank wants to hold may change as its deposits and transactions change. When a bank needs additional reserves on a short-term basis, it can borrow them from other banks that happen to have more reserves than they need. These loans take place in a private financial market called the federal funds market.

The interest rate on the overnight borrowing of reserves is called the federal funds rate or simply the "funds rate." It adjusts to balance the supply of and demand for reserves. For example, if the supply of reserves in the fed funds market is greater than the demand, then the funds rate falls, and if the supply of reserves is less than the demand, the funds rate rises.

What are open market operations?

The major tool the Fed uses to affect the supply of reserves in the banking system is open market operationsthat is, the Fed buys and sells government securities on the open market. These operations are conducted by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

Suppose the Fed wants the funds rate to fall. To do this, it buys government securities from a bank. The Fed then pays for the securities by increasing that bank's reserves. As a result, the bank now has more reserves than it wants. So the bank can lend these unwanted reserves to another bank in the federal funds market. Thus, the Fed's open market purchase increases the supply of reserves to the banking system, and the federal funds rate falls.

When the Fed wants the funds rate to rise, it does the reverse, that is, it sells government securities. The Fed receives payment in reserves from banks, which lowers the supply of reserves in the banking system, and the funds rate rises.


What is the discount rate?

Banks also can borrow reserves directly from the Federal Reserve Banks at their "discount windows," and the discount rate is the rate that financially sound banks must pay for this "primary credit." The Boards of Directors of the Reserve Banks set these rates, subject to the review and determination of the Federal Reserve Board. ("Secondary credit" is offered at higher interest rates and on more restrictive terms to institutions that do not qualify for primary credit.) Since January 2003, the discount rate has been set 100 basis points above the funds rate target, though the difference between the two rates could vary in principle. Setting the discount rate higher than the funds rate is designed to keep banks from turning to this source before they have exhausted other less expensive alternatives. At the same time, the (relatively) easy availability of reserves at this rate effectively places a ceiling on the funds rate.

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