Democratic Underground Latest Greatest Lobby Journals Search Options Help Login
Google

California farms are looking greener than ever

Printer-friendly format Printer-friendly format
Printer-friendly format Email this thread to a friend
Printer-friendly format Bookmark this thread
Home » Discuss » Latest Breaking News Donate to DU
 
ellisonz Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-23-11 10:46 PM
Original message
California farms are looking greener than ever
Source: LA Times



California farmers are finishing up harvesting 454,500 acres of cotton, almost 50% more acreage than last year. (Brian van der Brug, Los Angeles Times / October 19, 2011)

California farms are looking greener than ever
With prices for many crops near all-time highs, farm income is expected to post strong gains this year. That makes the agriculture sector a rare bright spot in the state's economy.

By Diana Marcum, Los Angeles Times

November 23, 2011, 7:02 p.m.
Reporting from Fresno
As Californians savor their Thanksgiving feasts, the states' farmers are especially thankful. California's agriculture sector is on track for a record year, a rare bright spot in the state's economy.

Prices for cotton, grapes and other crops are near all-time highs. Foreign buyers are gobbling California almonds, grapes, citrus and dairy products. Agricultural exports through September are up 16% over the same period last year. Net farm income is projected to post strong gains in 2011 after nearly doubling over the previous decade.

------

That's good news for California, the nation's leading agricultural state and the fifth-largest producer worldwide. In contrast with the grain-and-livestock focused Midwest, California farmers cultivate more than 400 commodities, including more than half of the nation's fruits and vegetables.

Looking for artichokes? Dates? Kiwi? Pomegranates? California accounts for more than 99% of the U.S. production of each of those crops, according to the California Food and Agriculture Department.

Read more: http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-california-ag-boo...
Refresh | +14 Recommendations Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
XemaSab Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-23-11 10:52 PM
Response to Original message
1. Fuck cotton
n/t
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
ellisonz Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-23-11 10:59 PM
Response to Reply #1
2. XemaSab is all wool and polyester.
:evilgrin:
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
XemaSab Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Nov-24-11 01:03 AM
Response to Reply #2
12. This is how I roll:
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Odin2005 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-23-11 11:23 PM
Response to Reply #1
6. Cotton is one of the few fabrics that don't feel like sandpaper on my skin.
Fuck wool, that shit's nasty. And polyester makes me itch.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
shanti Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Nov-24-11 11:36 AM
Response to Reply #1
22. HEMP!
would that it were.....
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
formercia Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Nov-24-11 01:33 PM
Response to Reply #1
25. Cotton is not exactly a green crop
The herbicides they spray to drop the leaves are terrible. I used to have to drive by cotton fields to get to work. The smell was awful.

Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
freshwest Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-23-11 10:59 PM
Response to Original message
3. I wish we would get more California fresh produce. IDK where it's going.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
tularetom Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-23-11 11:03 PM
Response to Original message
4. Yup, and they're doing it all with taxpayer subsidized water
Cotton in an arid climate like CA is a very thirsty crop. Because of the long growing season, particularly in the desert regions of southern California, cotton requires about 1.25 meters of water (about 50 inches) to develop properly. In a region that receives less than 10 inches of rainfall annually. This means that gazillions of gallons of water must be applied to the thousands of acres of cotton and the overwhelming bulk of this water is delivered at greatly reduced rates through state and federally financed irrigation storage and distribution facilities.

There used to be something called the 160 acre limitation for receiving water from facilities constructed by the US Bureau of Reclamation. The corporate farmers beat that back decades ago and now they get all the cheap water they want. And the best part for them is - you and I get to pay for it.

Of course it's green. The 99% makes it that way.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Lasher Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Nov-24-11 02:25 AM
Response to Reply #4
15. Don't forget the $20 billion in farm subsidies.
About $4 billion of that goes to cotton producers.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
eppur_se_muova Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Nov-24-11 11:17 AM
Response to Reply #4
18. That was my first reaction -- cotton is a thirsty crop.
And I read Marc Reisner's "Cadillac Desert", so I know about the water subsidies ... CA growers use cheap, 90% subsidized irrigation water to grow crops to compete with Eastern farmers who don't need irrigation.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
kestrel91316 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-23-11 11:09 PM
Response to Original message
5. It feels like a 3rd world country here. Our crops go for export, not to feed us.
How else do you explain apples selling for $3-4/lb IN SEASON?
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
shanti Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Nov-24-11 11:37 AM
Response to Reply #5
23. exactly
even the 99cent store's produce is largely from mexico.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Bennyboy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-23-11 11:29 PM
Response to Original message
7. Some Cali green here...
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
CaliforniaPeggy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-23-11 11:37 PM
Response to Reply #7
8. Now this stuff would bring a lot of great tax revenue, IF it were legal.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
ellisonz Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-23-11 11:48 PM
Response to Reply #8
10. Yes it would. But you know the drug warriors would never allow that...
...can't have it competing with alcohol.

People might actually come to their senses. :hippie:
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
phasma ex machina Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Nov-24-11 02:07 AM
Response to Reply #10
14. Actually, the DuPont clan will never allow hemp rope to compete with nylon rope.
The decision of the United States Congress to pass the Marihuana Tax Act of 1937 was based on hearings and reports. In 1936 the Federal Bureau of Narcotics (FBN) noticed an increase of reports of people smoking marijuana, which further increased in 1937. The Bureau drafted a legislative plan for Congress, seeking a new law and the head of the FBN, Harry J. Anslinger, ran a campaign against marijuana. Newspaper mogul William Randolph Hearst's empire of newspapers began publishing what is known as "Yellow journalism", demonizing the cannabis plant and putting emphasis on connections between cannabis and violent crime. Several scholars argue that the goal was to destroy the hemp industry, largely as an effort of Hearst, Andrew Mellon and the Du Pont family. They argue that with the invention of the decorticator hemp became a very cheap substitute for the paper pulp that was used in the newspaper industry. They also believe that Hearst felt that this was a threat to his extensive timber holdings. Mellon was Secretary of the Treasury and the wealthiest man in America and had invested heavily in nylon, DuPont's new synthetic fiber, and considered its success to depend on its replacement of the traditional resource, hemp. (link)
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
shanti Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Nov-24-11 11:36 AM
Response to Reply #10
20. and then there's the california wine industry
:)
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
roman7 Donating Member (77 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Nov-25-11 03:05 AM
Response to Reply #7
26. that looks so goood
bennyboy you can be my (bud)dyboy anytime
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
provis99 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-23-11 11:42 PM
Response to Original message
9. and they're doing it by destroying the Colorado River.
Edited on Wed Nov-23-11 11:42 PM by provis99
cotton is about the most destructive crop you can grow, and sucks up water like a sponge. To grow it in a desert like California is mind-numbing stupidity.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
ellisonz Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-23-11 11:50 PM
Response to Reply #9
11. Agreed.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
CanSocDem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Nov-24-11 09:23 AM
Response to Reply #9
16. And saving the....


...recycled 'bath water' to irrigate the lettuce and tomatoes.

Face it, CA simply has no interest in producing something of value. Hemp is more useful than cotton and cannabis is more useful than lettuce.

And, dissent will not be tolerated.

.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
DBoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Nov-24-11 11:11 AM
Response to Reply #16
17. oh yeah?
Try having a BLT with fresh hemp leaves instead of lettuce. Bleh!
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
DCBob Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Nov-24-11 11:36 AM
Response to Reply #9
21. also requires high chemical inputs eg. fertizer and pesticides.
Its a crop that is hard on the environment.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
msongs Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Nov-24-11 01:47 AM
Response to Original message
13. whatever happend with the hemp legislation. thought it went to Gov Brown to sign? nt
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
shanti Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Nov-24-11 11:38 AM
Response to Reply #13
24. he vetoed it.
"with reservations", he said the time was not now.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
bhikkhu Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Nov-24-11 11:35 AM
Response to Original message
19. Oregon is doing well too
Harvests have been very good this year, prices are good as well. The one problem is that expenses are up for everything, but so far so good - for most farmers, the balance is toward a good year.

Agriculture is a foundation that every other thing builds upon, so in one way or another, we all depend on farmers, and should wish them well!
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
DU AdBot (1000+ posts) Click to send private message to this author Click to view 
this author's profile Click to add 
this author to your buddy list Click to add 
this author to your Ignore list Wed Oct 01st 2014, 10:26 PM
Response to Original message
Advertisements [?]
 Top

Home » Discuss » Latest Breaking News Donate to DU

Powered by DCForum+ Version 1.1 Copyright 1997-2002 DCScripts.com
Software has been extensively modified by the DU administrators


Important Notices: By participating on this discussion board, visitors agree to abide by the rules outlined on our Rules page. Messages posted on the Democratic Underground Discussion Forums are the opinions of the individuals who post them, and do not necessarily represent the opinions of Democratic Underground, LLC.

Home  |  Discussion Forums  |  Journals |  Store  |  Donate

About DU  |  Contact Us  |  Privacy Policy

Got a message for Democratic Underground? Click here to send us a message.

© 2001 - 2011 Democratic Underground, LLC