Democratic Underground Latest Greatest Lobby Journals Search Options Help Login
Google

Zimbabwe economy shrinks by 30%

Printer-friendly format Printer-friendly format
Printer-friendly format Email this thread to a friend
Printer-friendly format Bookmark this thread
This topic is archived.
Home » Discuss » Latest Breaking News Donate to DU
 
seemslikeadream Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 07:59 AM
Original message
Zimbabwe economy shrinks by 30%
HARARE - Zimbabwe's real gross domestic product contracted by about 30% while poverty levels have doubled over the past five years, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) said.
School enrolment has also fallen by 35 percent, the IMF concluded as it wound up its two week-long annual routine visit to Zimbabwe.

The economy's sharp contraction was reflected in real GDP which "declined by about 30%, and was still contracting," the IMF said in a statement, issued in Harare.

"Inflation doubled each of the last three years to reach 600% at the end of 2003," it added.

Unemployment, estimated at 70%, has been rising as "poverty has doubled since 1995, school enrolment declined to 65% in 2003".

more
http://www.bday.co.za/bday/content/direct/1,3523,158451...
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
FlashHarry Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 08:17 AM
Response to Original message
1. Hmm. Must have been caused by Mugabe's pay rise.
Talk about balls.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
seemslikeadream Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 08:34 AM
Response to Original message
2. Did We All Do A Clare Short?
New African, May 2003:

"How could the UK be a democracy in 1917 when women couldn't vote until 1928?"
-- Elizabeth Atherton of Chester, England, in a letter to The Guardian, 9 April 2003.


So the people of Iraq have been liberated? God bless the liberators! But if liberation was the goal, why were they so coy about it before the invasion? So it wasn't weapons of mass destruction after all?

Which should be a veritable lesson to us all about double-speak. Now when they say the UK is the mother of all democracies, we know what they mean. Double-speak. "How could the UK be a democracy in 1917," asks Elizabeth Atherton, "when women couldn't vote until 1928?"

Before we go further, please do remember this: In my native Ghana, our elders have a simple philosophy: "Wo foro dua pa a, na yepea wo" (You get support only when you embark on a good cause). Is there, or was there, a place for this pillar of African thought, in fact way of life, in the charade now being called the "liberation" of Iraq?

May I introduce here Ms. Clare Short, the British secretary for international development. Was she double-speaking when she threatened to resign if Britain went to war in Iraq without UN authority? Let's hear her:

"If there is not UN authority for military action, or if there is not UN authority for the reconstruction of the country, I will not uphold a breach of international law or this undermining of the UN and I will resign from the government... Absolutely, there is no question about that," she said on BBC Radio 4 on 9 March.

http://www.swans.com/library/art9/ankomah9.html
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
ZR2 Donating Member (345 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 08:37 AM
Response to Original message
3. BushCo has to be responsible for this
there has to be a link somewhere.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
seemslikeadream Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 08:50 AM
Response to Reply #3
7. Zimbabwe: West aided 'mercenaries'
Wednesday, March 10, 2004 Posted: 5:43 PM EST (2243 GMT)




The U.S.-registered 727 sits at a Zimbabwean military airfield.


HARARE, Zimbabwe -- Zimbabwe has accused U.S., British and Spanish spy agencies of helping suspected mercenaries detained in Harare to overthrow Equatorial Guinea's government.

The 64 men, mainly Angolans, South Africans and Namibians, were arrested in the Zimbabwean capital on Sunday after arriving on a Boeing 727, officials said. The plane is currently impounded.

Meanwhile on Wednesday, 15 men were also under arrest 3,200 kilometers (2,000 miles) away in Equatorial Guinea. The president of the small central Africa country said the groups were part of a coup plot funded by "enemy powers" and multinationals.

Zimbabwe's Home Affairs Minister Kembo Mohadi backed those claims, telling reporters the mercenaries were trying to overthrow the government of Equitorial Guinea

more
http://www.cnn.com/2004/WORLD/africa/03/10/zimbabwe.pla...
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
seemslikeadream Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 08:37 AM
Response to Original message
4. 'Libya must sever its ties with Zimbabwe'
April 01 2004 at 10:16AM



Britain is trying to woo Libya into ending its support for Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe following British Prime Minister Tony Blair and Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi's very first meeting in Tripoli last week.

Blair told the House of Commons this week that his country hoped it could change Gaddafi's mind regarding his continued support for Mugabe.
http://www.iol.co.za/index.php?click_id=85&art_id=vn200...
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Name removed Donating Member (0 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 08:44 AM
Response to Reply #4
5. Deleted message
Message removed by moderator. Click here to review the message board rules.
 
newyawker99 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 06:52 PM
Response to Reply #5
34. Hi nick uk!!
Welcome to DU!! :toast:
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
seemslikeadream Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 08:47 AM
Response to Original message
6. "HANDS OFF ZIMBABWE"
The imperialists are also targeting Zimbabwe for the role its armed forces played in the crisis that unfolded in the Democratic Republic of Congo in 1998. After the fall of CIA puppet Mobutu Sese Seko, the government of Congo was led by Laurent Kabila, who openly denounced imperialist intervention in his country and the region. Kabila asked the Southern African Development Community for military assistance to help repel an invasion by Uganda and Rwanda that had the backing of the United States and Britain.

The SADC sent troops from Zimbabwe, Angola and Namibia to assist the Congo. Kabila was eventually assassinated in January 2000, however.

Bush and Blair want to make an example of Zimbabwe for some of the same reasons they are hostile to Iraq, Iran, North Korea, Palestine, Venezuela, the Phillippines and Cuba. No country is allowed to defy them. It is all about endless war for U.S. empire in order to re-carve up the world for profits on behalf of big business.

Mugabe was once viewed as a "model" African leader--until the land confiscations took center stage.

Robert Mugabe is a nationalist who aspires to see the development of an indigenous property-owning class inside Zimbabwe. Revolutionary socialists do not necessarily support Mugabe's policies, but defend his open rebellion against imperialism. The anti-imperialist movement, especially in the United States, has a responsibility to demand reparations for the people of Zimbabwe who are fighting to complete their national liberation, which means freeing their economy from colonialist and imperialist penetration.

more

http://www.iacenter.org/bush-africa.htm
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
AP Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 10:06 AM
Response to Reply #6
14. I'm curious. Any opinon on this?
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
seemslikeadream Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 10:26 AM
Response to Reply #14
20. I very rarely state my opinion
although others with physic ability seem to be able to attribute some opinion to me. All I do is post news stories. I let others decide for themselves what to think. You have certain opinions but, maybe I missed something, I have never seen a thread started by you posting links to express your thoughts. Are they not important enough? Why do you only just complain about others? Post something yourself instead of laying in wait in a duck blind just to denounce others.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
AP Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 10:38 AM
Response to Reply #20
23. If, say, Buzzflash never stated their opinion, you'd still know what...
...they thought.

It's called "editorial agenda."
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
seemslikeadream Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 10:49 AM
Response to Reply #23
25. Thanks for the compliment
Edited on Thu Apr-01-04 11:08 AM by seemslikeadream
but I am no Buzzflash. And for someone who is so juvenile to post something another wrote to you in a pm (PRIVATE MAIL)NOTE THE WORD PRIVATE is frankly unconscionable, so others are forewarned. The content of the pm meant nothing to me but the betrayal is unforgivable!

Sending a pm is a matter of trust, and I trusted you once.

and try addressing this:

You have certain opinions but, maybe I missed something, I have never seen a thread started by you posting links to express your thoughts. Are they not important enough? Why do you only just complain about others? Post something yourself instead of laying in wait in a duck blind just to denounce others.




Now isn't this interesting!

Apology to AP and ChavezSpeaksTheTruth


Late last week, I accused AP and ChavezSpeaksTheTruth of being the same poster, after one posted from the contents of a private message I sent to the other.

While I still haven't seen an adequate explanation for why or how that happened, Skinner looked into it and reported that, at first glance, they did not appear to be posting from the same computer.

I have not heard from him since.

Since I haven't, I think I have to give them both the benefit of the doubt; I appear to have been over-hasty. While we may disagree on substantive issues, I would hope that they wouldn't hold this against me personally. I also hope they understand why I was concerned. My goal was certainly not to defame anyone.


Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
AP Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 11:11 AM
Response to Reply #25
26. Reading for context.
I'm not CSPTT. M. didn't PM me. I posted something M said publicly about a year ago.

I'm allowed to do that right?
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
seemslikeadream Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 11:14 AM
Response to Reply #26
27. You did do it to me!
n/t
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
AP Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 11:16 AM
Response to Reply #27
29. I have no idea what you're talking about.
Really.

I'm glad you're reading SWANS, however.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
seemslikeadream Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 11:25 AM
Response to Reply #29
30. Well I could post it
Edited on Thu Apr-01-04 11:54 AM by seemslikeadream
I save everything! Not unthinkable that you wouldn't even remember it. But I remember you and JudiLyn speaking about me like I wasn't even there and discussing how unintelligent I am for not reading enough and thinking the way you do and JudiLyn making sure that thread was posted in another thread I started about Zimbabwe, infering that I didn't know what I was talking about. So lets just stop.


Let's just call it a day on this and move on.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
AP Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 12:04 PM
Response to Reply #30
32. You're so cryptic,
it's really strange.

Why don't you give me the courtesy of letting me know what you're talking about.

Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
AP Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 11:15 AM
Response to Reply #25
28. Furthermore, I still have no idea what you're talking about...
You publicly accused me of something cryptic ("trying once").

I think I'm entitled to ask you publicly what the hell you were talking about.

I STILL have no idea what you're talking about.

Is it my response to the Hornsby song? I have no idea.

You're very confusing.

Another thing, above you complain about me responding to your posts of articles. Psst. That's what DU is all about. I can't believe you have such a think skin when it comes to DUers doing what DUers do 99% of the time -- respond to posts.

If you can't take the heat...
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
seemslikeadream Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 08:52 AM
Response to Original message
8. Zimbabwe: "The Land Has Come Back"
New African: Amidst the mounting Western strangulation and demonisation of Zimbabwe in recent months, the government has quietly pressed ahead with its fast track land reform programme, bringing it to a virtual end. Baffour Ankomah reports from Harare.

"The land has come back," a triumphant President Mugabe declared at the ruling Zanu-PF Central Committee meeting in Chinhoyi on 12 December. "The age-old question has now been answered. We have not just made history in post-colonial Africa; we have also written a new page on social justice and social change," he thundered.

All out of international glare, and as Britain and its Western allies tightened the economic noose around the neck of Zimbabwe in recent months leading to severe hardships in the country, Mugabe's government has quietly gone ahead with its fast track land reform programme, bringing it to a virtual completion.

In a major interview with the state-owned newspaper, The Herald, published on 12 December, Mugabe said Britain's "negative attitude" to the land programme "was a blessing in disguise" as it enabled his government to acquire more land and at a faster rate than it would have been possible had Britain agreed to compensate the white farmers. (See David Hasluck's historic interview).

If Britain had played ball, Mugabe said "the land issue would have been resolved along the path of understanding between us and Britain, which would have resulted in an understanding between us and the commercial farmers.

"There would not have emerged a situation of conflict between us and the commercial farmers, but that would have meant our moving smoothly, taking into account the feelings of the white farmers, and this would not have made for a faster rate of occupying and distributing the land.

http://www.swans.com/library/art9/ankomah3.html
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
AP Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 10:20 AM
Response to Reply #8
17. "as Britain and its Western allies tightened the economic noose"
I wonder how much of the 30% drop can be attributed to this?
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Rockholm Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 08:55 AM
Response to Original message
9. Mugabe's 400% pay raise, while millions starve!
BoshCo is probably behind this. Hey, maybe there's oil in those barren tobacco fields! Just wait.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
seemslikeadream Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 09:02 AM
Response to Reply #9
10. There is oil all around
US Quest for Oil


US Quest for Oil in Africa Worries Analysts, Activists

The Bush administration's search for more secure sources of oil is leading it to the doorsteps of some of the world's most troubled and repressive regimes: the petroleum-rich countries of West Africa.


The national energy plan drafted by Vice President Dick Cheney's task force spotlighted West Africa as "the fastest-growing source of oil and gas for the American market," and the administration has promised industry officials to do what it can to promote development. The first African head of state to visit President Bush in the White House was President Olusegun Obasanjo of Nigeria, the continent's leading producer. In September, Bush huddled privately in New York with leaders of 11 African nations, most of them current or prospective oil suppliers. Although the talks involved more than petroleum, participants said Bush discussed a $3.5-billion Chad-Cameroon pipeline project, whose partners include U.S.-basedExxonMobil Corp. and ChevronTexaco Corp.

A number of administration officials have traveled to the region in recent months. Secretary of State Colin L. Powell paid visits to Gabon and Angola, where he broke ground for a new U.S. Embassy. Bush plans to visit Africa later this year. The administration is paying unaccustomed attention to Sao Tome and Principe, a tiny island nation of 170,000 sitting atop an estimated 4 billion barrels of newly discovered oil reserves. President Fradique de Menezes has offered to let the U.S. build a naval base in Sao Tome, and a U.S. general went there last year to discuss security issues.

The State Department, which closed its embassy in Equatorial Guinea eight years ago because of human rights concerns and budget constraints, will open a new one there this year, in part because of oil discoveries. Meanwhile, it has authorized a firm run by retired Pentagon officials to train Equatorial Guinea's coast guard. The administration has also increased the authority of the U.S. Export-Import Bank to underwrite foreign projects, and bank officials say energy diversification is part of the reason. In October, the bank announced a $135-million loan guarantee to help finance construction of a petroleum plant in Nigeria.

http://www.globalpolicy.org/security/natres/oil/2003/01...

Cheney's Dirty Business by Wayne Madsen


(AR) WASHINGTON -- The Bush camp touts Cheney as an icon of statesmanship, but after serving as Secretary of Defense in Bush the Elder's administration and rescuing Kuwait's oil from the clutches of Sadaam Hussein, Cheney went on to become Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer of Halliburton, Inc., an oil drilling firm based in Houston. Halliburton owns the construction firm Brown & Root Services (BRS), a company involved in U.S. intelligence operations in Africa and elsewhere.
Considering the fact that Bush the Elder lives in Houston and was involved with both the oil business and the CIA, the Bush, Jr.-Cheney ticket must be a dream team for him, his friends in the oil industry, and the folks who work at the George Bush Center for Intelligence in Langley, Va. (formerly known as CIA headquarters).

The GOP has a knack for reaching into the past to find candidates to lead the nation into the future. In 1996, the party anointed Bob Dole, a veteran of WWII, to preside over a nation entering the 21st Century. Now Gov. Bush has not only reached back to the Bush administration but to the gloomy post-Watergate era, to pick Cheney, who was President Gerald Ford's chief of staff.

Cheney's links to defense contractors and the intelligence community are suspect because of the roles played by Halliburton and Brown & Root in some of the world's most volatile trouble spots. In 1998, while conducting research in Rwanda for my book, "Genocide and Covert Operations in Africa 1993-1999," a member of a U.S. military team reported that the latter was "into some real bad shit" in that beleaguered nation.

http://www.monitor.net/monitor/0008a/cheneycompany.html




Africa and African Oil


U.S. Military Shows Interest in Africa
By: Ellen Knickmeyer
Associated Press Date: 02/24/2004

DAKAR, Senegal - Top U.S. generals are touching down across Africa in unusual back-to-back trips, U.S. European Command confirmed Tuesday, part of a change in military planning as U.S. interest grows in African terror links and African oil.
Trips by two top European Command generals follow last week's similarly low-profile Africa visit by the U.S. commander in Europe, Marine Gen. James L. Jones.

The generals are leaders in U.S. military proposals to shift from Cold War-era troop buildups in western Europe to smaller concentrations closer to the world's trouble spots.

Jones' trip included stops in Morocco and Cameroon and talks with leaders of the sub-Sahara's military giants, Nigeria and South Africa, European Command spokesmen in Stuttgart, Germany said.

http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/news/world/8028821...


Oil found off the coast of Gambia
By: Jeevan Vasagar
Guardian, The Date: 02/18/2004

The president of Gambia has announced the discovery of "large quantities" of oil in his tiny West African country, the latest revelation of petrochemical riches in sub-Saharan Africa. In a national broadcast Yahya Jammeh, who seized control of the former British colony in a military coup 10 years ago, said the offshore discovery by a western company would result in "a harvest of prosperity".
West Africa already supplies the US with 15% of its oil imports, and the share is expected to grow as the Bush administration seeks to reduce dependence on the Gulf.

The Gambian find follows the discovery of viable deposits of crude oil off So Tom, in the Gulf of Guinea, where billions of barrels are believed to lie offshore.

Mr Jammeh did not name the company responsible for the study, but an Australian company, Fusion Oil and Gas, holds a licence to carry out deep-water exploration off the Gambian coast.

The Perth-based firm, which was unavailable for comment last night, describes itself as "a holding company for a group of companies whose business is oil and gas exploration in Africa".

http://www.guardian.co.uk/oil/story/0,11319,1150369,00....

U.S. Considers Building Port at Sao Tome to Protect Oil
By: Staff
Associated Press Date: 02/18/2004

DAKAR, Senegal - The United States is studying whether to build a deep-water port and new airport at Sao Tome, an island nation touted as a possible Navy base to protect growing Western oil interests in West Africa.

Ambassador Kenneth Moorefield and Sao Tome ministers signed the $800,000 study agreement at Sao Tome's current international airport, the U.S. Trade and Development Agency said in a statement.

Sao Tome, off oil-rich Nigeria, is one of the lead nations in an oil boom in West Africa as the United States, Asia and Europe look for alternatives to Mideast oil.

West Africa's Gulf of Guinea supplies the United States with 15 percent of its oil, a figure projected to grow to 25 percent by 2015.

The study on expanding Sao Tome's port and airport is in line with a U.S. agreement to "evaluate opportunities for technical assistance" to Sao Tome, the U.S. statement said.

http://www.independent-media.tv/item.cfm?fmedia_id=5769... ...

US opens new front in war on terror beefing up border in Sahara
By: Rory Carroll
Guardian, The Date: 01/14/2004

The US is sending troops and defence contractors to the Sahara desert of west Africa to open what it calls a new front in the war on terror. A small vanguard force arrived this week in Mauritania to pave the way for a $100m (54m) plan to bolster the security forces and border controls of Mauritania, Mali, Chad and Niger.
The US Pan-Sahel Initiative, as it is named, will provide 60 days of training to military units, including tips on desert navigation and infantry tactics, and furnish equipment such as Toyota Land Cruisers, radios and uniforms.

The reinforcement of America's defences in a remote, poorly patrolled region came on a day when US police forces gained important powers in the homeland to conduct searches.


http://www.guardian.co.uk/usa/story/0,12271,1122704,00....

Repost: African Black Gold
By: Simon Robinson
Time Magazine Date: 10/28/2002


The sleepy tropical island city of Malabo had hardly changed in years. The capital of Equatorial Guinea, a tiny West African nation of fewer than 500,000 people, consisted of little more than some moldering Spanish colonial buildings, a few palm-lined plazas and the tightly packed shanty towns which encircle most African settlements. Its one claim to fame was that novelist Frederick Forsyth lived there while he wrote his military thriller The Dogs of War. But over the past three years, Malabo has been transformed. Office buildings have shot up, hotels and banks have opened, and foreigners once a novelty in Malabo now cram the town's fancy new restaurants. There's so much construction, joke the locals, that if you open your mouth and stick out your tongue someone is likely to build on it.
The source of this economic boom can be found buried beneath the nearby ocean floor. Over the past decade, foreign oil companies have found at least 500 million barrels of high-grade crude oil in the country's waters. Production has jumped from just 17,000 barrels per day in 1996 to more than 220,000 and could grow another 50% within three years. The oil boom has fueled fantastic economic growth 65% last year, down to an estimated 25% this year and pushed annual per capita GDP from $800 seven years ago to more than $2,000 today. The bonanza in Equatorial Guinea is being repeated across the region. Chad, one of the poorest countries in the world, will soon start pumping more than 200,000 barrels of oil a day through a $3.7 billion, 1,070-km pipeline Africa's biggest-ever infrastructure project that transverses Cameroon.

The island nation of So Tom and Prncipe, which sits on perhaps 4 billion barrels of crude, is also attracting foreign oilmen. These upstart countries join such established giants as Nigeria, which plans to increase its output from its current 1.9 million barrels per day to more than 3 million; Angola, which wants to double its almost 1 million daily output; and Gabon, which is encouraging more deepwater exploration to prop up declining production. All the action makes the waters off West Africa one of the hottest places for oil exploration in the world. On a global scale, the numbers may seem modest; total proven reserves in the Gulf of Guinea sit at 40 billion barrels, less than one-sixth of Saudi Arabia's 261 billion. But Africa is just getting started. Says Al Stanton, an Edinburgh-based oil analyst with Deutsche Bank: "The opportunities for expansion are tremendous."

http://www.time.com/time/europe/magazine/article/0,1300... ...

Hunt for 'new' oil
By: Timothy Burn
Washington Times Date: 09/28/2003

U.S. oil companies have been drilling off the west coast of Africa for years, but as major players like ChevronTexaco and ExxonMobil continue to strike massive oil deposits in these deep waters, the Bush administration has taken notice.
The United States has been scouring the planet for new sources of oil beyond the Middle East. The September 11 terrorist attacks and the war in Iraq convinced the administration that the United States must move quickly to find new foreign oil partners.

What better place to look than an oil-rich region that lies just 4,500 miles from the East Coast, with an unobstructed sea route to U.S. ports, a region that could supply as much as a quarter of U.S. oil imports?

West Africa is rapidly emerging as a key strategic outpost for President Bush's twin policy goals of taking the war on terror far away from U.S. borders and breaking the Arab stranglehold on world oil prices.

http://washingtontimes.com/specialreport/20030928-12343...

Sept. 2003: U.S. donates ships to protect Nigeria oil
By: Dulue Mbachu
Associated Press Date: 09/05/2003

LAGOS, Nigeria -- The United States is donating several ships to Nigeria to help the West African nation protect its massive oil assets from gangs who steal an estimated 10 percent of oil profits daily, authorities said Friday.
The third of seven former U.S. Coast Guard ships to be delivered by year's end arrived at the port in Lagos on Thursday, a U.S. Embassy official told The Associated Press on condition of anonymity. The first ship arrived in March.

Nigerian authorities plan to deploy the vessels in the troubled southern Niger Delta region, which produces almost all of Nigeria's oil output.

"Our national assets in the sea are worth billions of dollars and the arrival (of the ships) would help safeguard them," a Nigerian navy statement quoted Vice Adm. Samuel Afolayan as saying.

http://www.independent-media.tv/item.cfm?fmedia_id=2376... ...

Aug 2002: US naval base to protect Sao Tome oil
By: Staff
BBC Date: 08/22/2002

The tiny island nation of Sao Tome and Principe, off the West African coast, has agreed to host a US naval base to protect its oil interests. The country holds a strategic position in the oil rich Gulf of Guinea from which the US could monitor the movement of oil tankers and guard oil platforms.
"Last week I received a call from the Pentagon to tell me that the issue is being studied," President Fradique De Menezes told Portugal's RTP Internacional TV.

"This will be good for Sao Tome as it will ensure the future of the country in relation to those that are ambitious and are looking to come to the country when oil is extracted from our waters," he said.

The former Portuguese colony has a very small army on which it spends only $1m a year.

The president was responding to rumours that the US planned to build a air force and naval base after a visit in July by a US General Carlton Fulford, deputy commander-in-chief, US European Command.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/2210571.stm

Americans muscle in as 'big whities' flock to new El Dorado

Rory Carroll, Africa correspondent
Tuesday June 17, 2003
The Guardian

Step inside the air-conditioned lounge of the Viking Club and Luanda's squalor could be another universe. Here the oil executives and engineers sip beer and discuss geological reports, deals and money.
Beyond the shattered skyline of Angola's capital, buried beneath the Atlantic, is a vast store of oil, and their job is to extract it. The accents are British, Australian, French and, increasingly, American.

The "big whities", as the taxi drivers call them, have been coming for years but now the flights are fuller than ever: new offshore discoveries are expected to double output to 2 million barrels per day, prompting talk of a drilling El Dorado.

Angola's government, adept at playing off rival oil companies to maximise its revenue, expects an investment boom of $50bn (30bn) in the next decade.

A US contractor will help build an oil refinery in Lobito harbour, 250 miles south of Luanda, to process the light crude suitable for American cars. Now that Washington wants west African oil to cut US dependency on the Gulf, its envoys are beating a path to the capital.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/oil/story/0,11319,979101,00.h...

Scramble for Africa

Fear of corruption and chaos in oil rush

Charlotte Denny, economics correspondent
Tuesday June 17, 2003
The Guardian

Washington's determination to find an alternative energy source to the Middle East is leading to a new oil rush in sub-Saharan Africa which threatens to launch a fresh cycle of conflict, corruption and environmental degradation in the region, campaigners warn today.
The new scramble for Africa risks bringing more misery to the continent's impoverished citizens as western oil companies pour billions of dollars in secret payments into government coffers throughout the continent. Much of the money ends up in the hands of ruling elites or is squandered on grandiose projects and the military.

Tony Blair will today urge the oil industry to be more transparent in its dealings with Africa. Openness and accountability are essentials for stability and prosperity in the developing world, he will tell oil company executives and oil exporting countries at a meeting in Lancaster House in central London.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/oil/story/0,11319,979053,00.h...


Oil shocked

A desire to loosen Opec's stranglehold on petroleum prices lies behind Bush's interest in Africa and his plans for Iraq, writes Randeep Ramesh

Friday July 11, 2003

America's new world order appears founded on a declaration of independence. George Bush, an oil man from an oil state, wants America to wean itself off a dangerous addiction to faraway hydrocarbons.
As the president's national energy plan puts it, this is "a condition of increased dependency on foreign powers that do not always have American interests at heart".

Although admirably blunt, this statement has haunted the Bush administration since it was made in May 2001 - months before the attacks of September 11. America's war on terrorism is often viewed as a scramble for black gold.

There is a logic to this. Getting gas out of the Caspian is a lot easier if you are faced with a pliant Afghanistan. If Iraq is not run by a dictator determined to use oil as a weapon of war - as Dick Cheney said " seek domination of the entire Middle East" - then Americans could sleep easier.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/oil/story/0,11319,996305,00.h...

Oil and terrorism drive the presidential tour

Julian Borger in Washington
Monday July 7, 2003
The Guardian

President Bush's trip to Africa this week signals a recent strategic decision to increase America's military presence to bolster what Washington now sees as two important national interests on the continent - the supply of oil and the struggle against terrorism.
On the eve of departure, General James Jones, the commander of the US European command with responsibility for African operations, said the US was trying to negotiate the long-term use of a "family" of military bases across the continent.

This would include big installations for up to 5,000-strong brigades "that could be robustly used for a significant military presence," Gen Jones told the New York Times. It would also involve smaller, lightly equipped bases available in times of crisis to special forces or marines.

The bases would not only be established in north African states such as Algeria, where Islamic extremism is already a potent force, but also in sub-Saharan African nations such as Mali.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/usa/story/0,12271,993022,00.h...

US military wants to increase its presence in Africa
By Eric Schmitt in Washington
July 7 2003

The United States military is seeking to expand its presence in Africa through new basing agreements and training exercises aimed at combating a growing terrorist threat.

Even as military planners prepare options for US troops to join an international peacekeeping force to oversee a ceasefire in Liberia, the Pentagon wants to enhance military ties with allies such as Morocco and Tunisia.

It is also seeking to gain long-term access to bases in countries such as Mali and Algeria, which US forces could use for periodic training or to strike terrorists. And it aims to build on aircraft refuelling agreements in Senegal and Uganda, two countries that President George Bush is to visit on the five-nation swing through Africa that he begins tomorrow.

There were no plans to build permanent US bases in Africa, Pentagon officials said. Instead, the US European Command, which oversees military operations in most of Africa, wants troops now in Europe to rotate more often into bare-bones camps or airfields in Africa. Marines may spend more time sailing off West Africa.

http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2003/07/06/1057430078697...


Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
StopThief Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 09:25 AM
Response to Original message
11. The only important fact is that. . . .
the farmland has been reclaimed from the evil colonial farmers. Everything else including the coming mass starvation is just noise. :eyes:
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
seemslikeadream Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 09:34 AM
Response to Reply #11
12. Let them eat cake!
:cry:
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
AP Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 10:14 AM
Response to Reply #11
16. The neoliberals have been screaming "mass starvation" for almost two years
It's time to let go of that one. It's not happening.

Obviously, the economy is suffering in the transition, but millions aren't dying (as the Western press promised).

Furthermore, this land was being used for TOBACCO farming, and the huge profits from it were being deposited into Swiss bank accounts. Now the land is being used for subsistence maize farming, and is creating wealth for Zimbabweans.

It was neoliberalism that was going to starve and impoverish them.

"Let them eat cake" was the sentiment of the huge corporate farms which sold tobacco to Europe. Now, Mugabe's telling the subsistence farmers replacing them, 'let them eat maize.'

Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Name removed Donating Member (0 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 09:45 AM
Response to Original message
13. Deleted message
Message removed by moderator. Click here to review the message board rules.
 
AP Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 10:10 AM
Response to Reply #13
15. Here's why it's stupid to use this fact as a measure for whether any...
...former colony should use this as a measure for whether they exit the post-colonial relationship, and whether they should buck neoliberalism:

COLONIALISM WAS DISRUPTIVE TO GET INTO. IT'S GOING TO BE DISRUPTIVE TO GET OUT OF!!!

Saying that no country should end neoliberalism if it causes their economy to shrink is a recipe for the crappy, restrictive, unjust economy to continue forever for the benefit of London, New York and Amsterdam.

Transferring a lot of land to people who are going to ultimately make better use of it is going to be disruptive in the transition years. It's probably still going to be disruptive for another 30 years. But to say that these countries won't be better off in the very long term after ending neoliberalism and postcolonialism is beyond naive.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
KurtNilsen Donating Member (595 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 10:24 AM
Response to Reply #15
19. How many millions of life do you want to sacrifcy in order to
reach this future nirvana?
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
AP Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 10:37 AM
Response to Reply #19
22. It's funny to talk about colonialism and imperialism in terms of lives...
...lost.

How many do you think were lost to get Africa to the point it's at?

How many have actually been lost getting it out? In terms of Zimbabwe, you only hear of the threat of startvation. How many have actually died?

In any event, it took the deaths of thousands just to PERPETUATE colonialism (Smith, himself, killed something like 30,000 Zimbabweans in a couple month period) and to get into colonialism, Europeans did kill millions.

As far as moral authority goes based on the cost in terms of lives lost, don't worry, ending neoliberalism has the high ground.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
demdave Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 10:24 AM
Response to Reply #13
18. I guess the answer is 3:06PM DU time.
:boring: :donut: :evilgrin:
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
seemslikeadream Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 10:32 AM
Response to Reply #18
21. Thanks I needed that
Is it too early for a :smoke: and a :beer: if not have one on me :toast:
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
demdave Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 10:44 AM
Response to Reply #21
24. It's always happy hour somewhere. Think globally , act locally.
cheers
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
seemslikeadream Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 11:44 AM
Response to Original message
31. IMF Paints Bleak Picture of Zimbabwe's Economy


The International Monetary Fund has painted a bleak picture of Zimbabwe's economy, which it says continues to deteriorate. A team from the International Monetary Fund, which is one step away from expelling Zimbabwe, has spent two weeks collecting information for its annual report.


But times have changed, and even though President Robert Mugabe remains critical of the fund, his central bank governor welcomed the team warmly. The governor, former private sector banker Gideon Gono, said last December Zimbabwe needed to repay its IMF debt and be able to borrow again.


http://www.voanews.com/article.cfm?objectID=1BC396DC-4F...
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
AP Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 12:05 PM
Response to Reply #31
33. The IMF needs to get a mirror.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Zynx Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 07:46 PM
Response to Reply #33
36. Of course the IMF has problems, but I challenge you to go to Zimbabwe
Edited on Thu Apr-01-04 07:46 PM by Zynx
and then you tell me just how good their economy is. You will find massive poverty, unemployment, and inflation.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
AP Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-02-04 01:12 AM
Response to Reply #36
37. Please review my posts.
I'm not arguing that Z has a good economy. I'm arguing that it will have a better economy in 10, 25, 50 and 100 years because it's ending the post-colonial relationship with the west and striking back at neoliberalism.

(duh!)
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Zynx Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-01-04 07:44 PM
Response to Original message
35. Mugabe is a corrupt thug who cares nothing for his people.
Or he is completely inept. One way or the other, he is yet another failed strongman who deserves whatever ill happens to him.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
AP Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-02-04 01:16 AM
Response to Reply #35
38. Regardless of what you think, land reform is going to make a huge
difference in Zimbabwe, as it will in Namibia.

By the way, there was a list of corupt leaders here at DU that came from some research organization.

All the top 10 places were filled with the usual neoliberal suspects.

None of the anti-neoliberal leaders in countries made the list. Mugabe wasn't on the list.

Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
DU AdBot (1000+ posts) Click to send private message to this author Click to view 
this author's profile Click to add 
this author to your buddy list Click to add 
this author to your Ignore list Sun Dec 21st 2014, 07:56 AM
Response to Original message
Advertisements [?]
 Top

Home » Discuss » Latest Breaking News Donate to DU

Powered by DCForum+ Version 1.1 Copyright 1997-2002 DCScripts.com
Software has been extensively modified by the DU administrators


Important Notices: By participating on this discussion board, visitors agree to abide by the rules outlined on our Rules page. Messages posted on the Democratic Underground Discussion Forums are the opinions of the individuals who post them, and do not necessarily represent the opinions of Democratic Underground, LLC.

Home  |  Discussion Forums  |  Journals |  Store  |  Donate

About DU  |  Contact Us  |  Privacy Policy

Got a message for Democratic Underground? Click here to send us a message.

© 2001 - 2011 Democratic Underground, LLC