Democratic Underground Latest Greatest Lobby Journals Search Options Help Login
Google

The 2006 Nobel Prize for Literature..

Printer-friendly format Printer-friendly format
Printer-friendly format Email this thread to a friend
Printer-friendly format Bookmark this thread
This topic is archived.
Home » Discuss » Latest Breaking News Donate to DU
 
Princess Turandot Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Oct-12-06 08:00 AM
Original message
The 2006 Nobel Prize for Literature..
The 2006 Nobel Prize for Literature has been awarded to Orhan Pamuk, from Turkey.

"who in the quest for the melancholic soul of his native city has discovered new symbols for the clash and interlacing of cultures"

(Nobel Prize Website: http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/literature/laureates... /

Pegasos Author's Calendar describes him as "Postmodernist Turkish novelist, a leading voice in contemporary fiction, who was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2006. Pamuk has portrayed the complex interaction between the traditional values of Islam and the European world....Pamuk was awarded in 2005 the German Book Trade's Peace Prize. In the same year the author was charged with insulting the Turkish Republic. An outspoken critic of Turkeys treatment of its Kurdish minority, Pamuk was quoted as saying in Das Magazin, a Swiss newspaper, "thirty thousand Kurds and a million Armenians were killed in these lands and nobody but me dares to talk about it." As a result, Pamuk's books were burned at a nationalist demonstration. In his acceptance speech of the prize Pamuk stated that "The fuelling of anti-Turkish sentiment in Europe is resulting in an anti-European, indiscriminate nationalism in Turkey." Charges against Pamuk were dropped in January 2006. EU Enlargement Commissioner Olli Rehn said that the decision was "good news for freedom of expression in Turkey".

http://www.kirjasto.sci.fi/pamuk.htm

Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
Captain Hilts Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Oct-12-06 08:08 AM
Response to Original message
1. I wish they'd give the title of the book in their release. I guess it's..
"Istanbul," but I thought that was non-fiction.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
muriel_volestrangler Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Oct-12-06 08:38 AM
Response to Reply #1
2. It's not awarded for a single book, but a body of work
Edited on Thu Oct-12-06 08:43 AM by muriel_volestrangler
Here's their summary:

Pamuk has said that growing up, he experienced a shift from a traditional Ottoman family environment to a more Western-oriented lifestyle. He wrote about this in his first published novel, a family chronicle entitled Cevdet Bey Ve Oğulları (1982), which in the spirit of Thomas Mann follows the development of a family over three generations.

His second novel, Sessiz Ev (1983; The House of Silence, 1998), uses five different narrator perspectives to describe a situation in which several family members visit their ageing grandmother at a popular seaside resort with Turkey teetering on the brink of civil war. The period is 1980. The grandchildrens political discussions and their friendships reflect a social chaos where various extremist organisations vie for power.

Pamuks international breakthrough came with his third novel, Beyaz Kale (1985; The White Castle, 1992). It is structured as an historical novel set in 17th-century Istanbul, but its content is primarily a story about how our ego builds on stories and fictions of different sorts. Personality is shown to be a variable construction. The storys main character, a Venetian sold as a slave to the young scholar Hodja, finds in Hodja his own reflection. As the two men recount their life stories to each other, there occurs an exchange of identities. It is perhaps, on a symbolic level, the European novel captured then allied with an alien culture.

Pamuks writing has become known for its play with identities and doubles. The issue appears in his novel Kara Kitap (1990; The Black Book, 1995) in which the protagonist searches the hubbub of Istanbul for his vanished wife and her half-brother, with whom he later exchanges identities. Frequent references to the mystic tradition of the East make it natural to see this in a Sufi perspective. Kara Kitap represented a definite break with the governing social realism in Turkish literature. It provoked debate in Turkey not least through its Sufism references. Pamuk based his screenplay for the film Gizli Yz (1992) on the novel.

...

http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/literature/laureates...


Also, non-fiction counts too. For instance, Winston Churchill won it, for his histories of Britain and the Second World War.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Captain Hilts Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Oct-12-06 09:01 AM
Response to Reply #2
3. Thanks! I tried to get through The Black Book...
and eventually gave up. I got two-third through and it just didn't go anywhere.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
non sociopath skin Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Oct-12-06 09:19 AM
Response to Reply #2
4. Though the committee would doubtless deny it, I suspect ...
... there's often a small-p political agenda in the literature prize.

Thus, Churchill - never more than a workmanlike writer - got his for helping to win the war against Naziism (They couldn't really give him the Peace Prize, could they?).

Likewise, Pamuk is at odds with the political conservatives in his own country.

The Skin
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
muriel_volestrangler Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Oct-12-06 10:14 AM
Response to Reply #4
6. Certainly true in Churchill's case
and yes, probably true in this one too - and perhaps with Pinter last year (though that may have been a case of his recent political writing reminding the committee of his earlier work, and that maybe he'd been waiting too long).
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
AngryAmish Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Oct-12-06 09:41 AM
Response to Original message
5. This is crap
Until William Trevor wins then the Noble Prize for Literature is a sick joke.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
bemildred Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Oct-12-06 11:27 AM
Response to Original message
7. Turkish author Orhan Pamuk wins Nobel prize for literature
STOCKHOLM - Orhan Pamuk, Turkey's best-known novelist and incendiary social commentator, won the 2006 Nobel prize for Literature on Thursday.

In its citation for the 10 million Swedish crown prize, the Swedish
Academy said: "In the quest for the melancholic soul of his native city, has discovered new symbols for the clash and interlacing of cultures."

Pamuk, who just months ago went on trial for insulting "Turkishness," was the first author in the Muslim world to condemn the fatwa against Salman Rushdie.

The Academy said his international breakthrough came with his third book, "Beyaz Kale" or "The White Castle," a historical novel about the relationship of a Venetian slave with the young scholar who buys him, and their gradual blurring of identities.

Haaretz
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
JCMach1 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Oct-12-06 01:23 PM
Response to Reply #7
12. CYLRC loves his stuff....
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
brentspeak Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Oct-12-06 11:41 AM
Response to Original message
8. Who?
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Orrin_73 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Oct-12-06 12:05 PM
Response to Original message
9. They didn't give him the nobel prize for being a
good writer but because of his political views.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
stanwyck Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Oct-12-06 12:20 PM
Response to Reply #9
10. I read "Snow"...and it was like slogging
through a blizzard.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Diogenes2 Donating Member (344 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Oct-12-06 01:01 PM
Response to Reply #10
11. Try ISTANBUL...
it's excellent.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Stockholm Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Oct-13-06 06:09 AM
Response to Reply #9
13. True and false
Edited on Fri Oct-13-06 06:10 AM by Stockholm
The body of work of the "artist" is the foundation but of course the structure of the academy is also important in the selection. I am very happy that a poet was elected this year as a new member since it increases the chance that my favourite poet Thomas Transtrmer eventually will recieve the prize. The academy now have a larger proportion writers than historically.

Another important factor is that the prize can only be given to someone who is alive, that could have been a contributing factor that H. Pinter got it last year. I am sure there are several writers/poets etc. who should have recieved the prize but failed to live long enough.

Link to the biobibliographical note of Mr. Pamuk:

http://www.svenskaakademien.se/LitiumDokument20/GetDocu...

Link to the Swedish Academy:

http://www.svenskaakademien.se/LitiumInformation/site/p...
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
bemildred Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Oct-13-06 10:36 AM
Response to Original message
14. Nobelist's Voice Goes Beyond His Books
ISTANBUL, Turkey Not so long ago, novelist Orhan Pamuk faced imprisonment in his homeland of Turkey. On Thursday, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in literature for novels of rich melancholy that evoke what the Swedish Academy called "new symbols for the clash and interlacing of cultures."

A best-selling and provocative author in Turkey who has steadily gained an international following, Pamuk is also seen by his supporters as a courageous, if sometimes reluctant, champion of free expression.

Speaking from New York, where he is teaching at Columbia University, Pamuk said, "This is first of all an honor bestowed upon the Turkish language, Turkish culture and Turkey itself, as well as on my writings which I produced solitary in my room."

---

My writing shows that East and West can combine that is what we have to wish for, to hope for. The fact that the image of Turkish culture does not exist in Western literature doesn't mean it doesn't exist."

http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-nob...
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
MrCoffee Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Oct-13-06 11:39 AM
Response to Original message
15. Pamuk is a FANTASTIC writer...this is such good news!
I love his work. I can't recommend him highly enough.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
DU AdBot (1000+ posts) Click to send private message to this author Click to view 
this author's profile Click to add 
this author to your buddy list Click to add 
this author to your Ignore list Sun Dec 21st 2014, 02:07 AM
Response to Original message
Advertisements [?]
 Top

Home » Discuss » Latest Breaking News Donate to DU

Powered by DCForum+ Version 1.1 Copyright 1997-2002 DCScripts.com
Software has been extensively modified by the DU administrators


Important Notices: By participating on this discussion board, visitors agree to abide by the rules outlined on our Rules page. Messages posted on the Democratic Underground Discussion Forums are the opinions of the individuals who post them, and do not necessarily represent the opinions of Democratic Underground, LLC.

Home  |  Discussion Forums  |  Journals |  Store  |  Donate

About DU  |  Contact Us  |  Privacy Policy

Got a message for Democratic Underground? Click here to send us a message.

© 2001 - 2011 Democratic Underground, LLC