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WP-Dan Froomkin-(Plame Watch)Judy Miller May Have Been a Source

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leveymg Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jul-06-05 01:50 PM
Original message
WP-Dan Froomkin-(Plame Watch)Judy Miller May Have Been a Source
Valerie Plame Watch
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/linkset/20...


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Carol D. Leonnig writes in The Washington Post: "A special prosecutor demanded yesterday that Time magazine reporter Matthew Cooper answer questions about his confidential sources and again urged a federal judge to jail him and New York Times reporter Judith Miller if they continue to refuse to comply. . . .

"In unusually blunt language, Fitzgerald told Chief U.S. District Judge Thomas F. Hogan that Cooper and Miller pretend that journalists have a broader right to protect confidential sources than lawyers, presidents and law enforcement officers."

Leonnig also offers this tantalizing paragraph: "Fitzgerald may learn more details from Cooper's notes. Sources close to the investigation say there is evidence in some instances that some reporters may have told government officials -- not the other way around -- that Wilson was married to Plame, a CIA employee."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/20...

Adam Liptak writes in the New York Times: "Mr. Fitzgerald, who had been restrained in his public filings, was harshly critical of the position taken by Ms. Miller and of statements supporting her by The Times. His response to Mr. Cooper was barely 4 pages; to Ms. Miller, 21 pages.

"In October, Judge Hogan held the reporters in civil contempt, sentencing them to up to 18 months in jail. He suspended the sentences while the reporters appealed, and he said last week that the maximum time they faced was 120 days, as the term of the grand jury will expire in October.

"Civil contempt is meant to be coercive rather than punitive. In yesterday's filing, though, Mr. Fitzgerald suggested that criminal prosecution was also a possibility."

This would explain why Rove seems so confident that he won't be convicted under the Intelligence Identies Protection Act (IIPA). He compartmentalized the leak so that Plame's full role as an undercover CIA operative was sourced through Judy Miller to the other reporters. Miller is not a gov't employee, so she can't be prosecuted under IIPA. Rove provided other information, but not that Plame was undercover. Very clever. But, he and the other government source have set themselves up for obstruction of justice, perjury, and possible conspiracy charges.

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tk2kewl Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jul-06-05 01:53 PM
Response to Original message
1. so they told rove... rove didn't know she was covert and told novak?
c'mon!?
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JohnnyBoots Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jul-06-05 02:42 PM
Response to Reply #1
12. Rove had official clearance to know all this, at that time??????
Edited on Wed Jul-06-05 02:42 PM by JohnnyBoots
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aquart Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jul-06-05 01:54 PM
Response to Original message
2. So. Rove outsourced treason.
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wallwriter Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-07-05 06:44 AM
Response to Reply #2
19. They'll do it much more cheaply overseas...
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ThoughtCriminal Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jul-06-05 01:55 PM
Response to Original message
3. "Miller is not a gov't employee"
What if, like Armstrong, she has received payments from government agencies?
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LSparkle Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jul-06-05 02:00 PM
Response to Reply #3
5. Hmmm ... and didn't she do more than just report from Iraq?
Wasn't she heading (de facto) some sort of group looking for WMDs? Not to mention serving as mouthpiece for Chalabi?
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htuttle Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jul-06-05 02:08 PM
Response to Reply #5
7. Yes. She took command of a military unit after the invasion
I'm NOT kidding. Howie Kurtz did a story on it:

Embedded Reporter's Role In Army Unit's Actions Questioned by Military
http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn?pagename=artic...

New York Times reporter Judith Miller played a highly unusual role in an Army unit assigned to search for dangerous Iraqi weapons, according to U.S. military officials, prompting criticism that the unit was turned into what one official called a "rogue operation."

More than a half-dozen military officers said that Miller acted as a middleman between the Army unit with which she was embedded and Iraqi National Congress leader Ahmed Chalabi, on one occasion accompanying Army officers to Chalabi's headquarters, where they took custody of Saddam Hussein's son-in-law. She also sat in on the initial debriefing of the son-in-law, these sources say.

Since interrogating Iraqis was not the mission of the unit, these officials said, it became a "Judith Miller team," in the words of one officer close to the situation.

In April, Miller wrote a letter objecting to an Army commander's order to withdraw the unit, Mobile Exploitation Team Alpha, from the field. She said this would be a "waste" of time and suggested that she would write about it unfavorably in the Times. After Miller took up the matter with a two-star general, the pullback order was dropped.

(snip)
"This was totally out of their lane, getting involved with human intelligence," said one military officer who, like several others interviewed, declined to be named because he is not an authorized spokesman. But, the officer said of Miller, "this woman came in with a plan. She was leading them. . . . She ended up almost hijacking the mission."

(more at link)


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ThoughtCriminal Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jul-06-05 02:34 PM
Response to Reply #7
10. Makes you wonder if she was taking $ from Chalabi
But the real revelation would be if she was getting $ from any U.S. agency.
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WillyT Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jul-06-05 11:57 PM
Response to Reply #7
17. And Then There's This... CIA And The Press: The Mighty Wurlitzer
<snip>

Alongside those Greek morality plays and Biblical injunctions, we are also reminded by history itself that the use of unethical means to achieve a worthy end can be self-destructive. Power, by definition, is isolated from the correcting signals of external criticism. Or perhaps the feeling of fighting evil fits so comfortably, that it's difficult to shed even after objective circumstances change.

The history of U.S. intelligence since World War II follows both patterns. The Office of Strategic Services, the CIA's predecessor, had jurisdiction over wartime covert operations and propaganda in the fight against fascism. OSS chief William Donovan recruited heavily among social and academic elites. When the CIA was launched in 1947 at the beginning of the Cold War, these pioneers felt that they had both the right and the duty to secretly manipulate the masses for the greater good.

OSS veteran Frank Wisner ran most of the early peacetime covert operations as head of the Office of Policy Coordination. Although funded by the CIA, OPC wasn't integrated into the CIA's Directorate of Plans until 1952, under OSS veteran Allen Dulles. Both Wisner and Dulles were enthusiastic about covert operations. By mid-1953 the department was operating with 7,200 personnel and 74 percent of the CIA's total budget.

Wisner created the first "information superhighway." But this was the age of vacuum tubes, not computers, so he called it his "Mighty Wurlitzer." The CIA's global network funded the Italian elections in 1948, sent paramilitary teams into Albania, trained Nationalist Chinese on Taiwan, and pumped money into the Congress for Cultural Freedom, the National Student Association, and the Center for International Studies at MIT. Key leaders and labor unions in western Europe received subsidies, and Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty were launched. The Wurlitzer, an organ designed for film productions, could imitate sounds such as rain, thunder, or an auto horn. Wisner and Dulles were at the keyboard, directing history.

<snip>

Link: http://www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/8425/CIAPRESS.HTM

Same good 'ole boys... same fucked-up results!

:nuke:


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whalerider55 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jul-06-05 02:37 PM
Response to Reply #3
11. technically
that would make her a contractor, not an employee

it's all in the benefits.

whalerider
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Peace Patriot Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jul-06-05 01:59 PM
Response to Original message
4. Yup, I suspect that Miller has a nice, cushy, sprawling villa in the
Bahamas waiting for her, for taking this fall. Or maybe not. Maybe the NYT will welcome her back with open arms. They couldn't be any more discredited than they are now. And she's a player, that Judith. A real asset.

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neverforget Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jul-06-05 02:08 PM
Response to Original message
6. Oh bullshit! How the hell would a journalist know the name of a
CIA NOC? Very, very few people know the real names of these NOC's. This does not change anything, as the question is still who gave her the name and why?
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leveymg Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jul-06-05 02:15 PM
Response to Reply #6
8. Yes, the other gov't source, that's the question.
Cheney is still MIA.
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kestrel91316 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jul-06-05 10:47 PM
Response to Reply #8
14. Heck, I bet Cheney is in the Bahamas nt
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whalerider55 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jul-06-05 02:33 PM
Response to Reply #6
9. miller spent...
fifteen years writing about WMD, and was intimately involved in research and info gathering on the issue. it is not entirely out of the question that she figured it out.

and maybe chalabi,who seems to have access to all kinds of unusual information, told her...

it may not be probable. but it is possible. either way, i'm not ready to call it bullshit. under this scenario, doewsn't it make sense for her to take three months in jail for contempt (the grand jury disbands in october) rather than have to plead the fifth or risk being charged with any number of other felonies that could be leveled by a creative prosecutor (who has already hinted at criminal charges against her...)

whalerider
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Zen Democrat Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jul-06-05 11:34 PM
Response to Reply #6
16. Maybe Judith is a NOC, too. Huh?
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struggle4progress Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jul-06-05 10:17 PM
Response to Original message
13. IIPA allows prosecution of persons other than gov't employees. eom
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Media_Lies_Daily Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jul-06-05 11:01 PM
Response to Original message
15. Wrong. The Act (link inside) applies to ANYONE that reveals the....
Edited on Wed Jul-06-05 11:02 PM by Media_Lies_Daily
...identity of an undercover intelligence operative:

--------------------------------------

TITLE 50 > CHAPTER 15 > SUBCHAPTER IV >

421. Protection of identities of certain United States undercover intelligence officers, agents, informants, and sources

(a) Disclosure of information by persons having or having had access to classified information that identifies covert agent

(b) Disclosure of information by persons who learn identity of covert agents as result of having access to classified information

(c) Disclosure of information by persons in course of pattern of activities intended to identify and expose covert agents

<http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/html/uscode50/usc_se... >

--------------------------------------

Read subparagraph (b) very carefully. It basically states that ANYONE who discloses the name of an undercover operative because of ACCESS to classified information is gulty of committing a felony.

"Access" can be defined as a glimpse of a classified document, a phone call discussing classified information, or a conversation with someone who is realying classified information.

Mr. Rove is confident of NOTHING. Mr. Rove has stated NOTHING. Mr. Rove's lawyer is blowing unfiltered high-test smoke that some of you are buying.
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leveymg Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-07-05 06:36 AM
Response to Reply #15
18. Give me some case law on prosecution of persons who glimpse
Please
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