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Q Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-22-03 07:14 AM
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Testimony of Paul Robeson before the HUAC
You Are the Un-Americans, and You Ought to be Ashamed of Yourselves: Paul Robeson Appears Before HUAC

Many African-American witnesses subpoenaed to testify at the House Committee on Un-American Activities (HUAC) hearings in the 1950s were asked to denounce Paul Robeson (18881976) in order to obtain future employment. Robeson, an All-American football player and recipient of a Phi Beta Kappa key at Rutgers, received a law degree at Columbia. He became an internationally acclaimed concert performer and actor as well as a persuasive political speaker. In 1949, Robeson was the subject of controversy after newspapers reports of public statements that African Americans would not fight in an imperialist war. In 1950, his passport was revoked. Several years later, Robeson refused to sign an affidavit stating that he was not a Communist and initiated an unsuccessful lawsuit. In the following testimony to a HUAC hearing, ostensibly convened to gain information regarding his passport suit, Robeson refused to answer questions concerning his political activities and lectured bigoted Committee members Gordon H. Scherer and Chairman Francis E.Walter about African-American history and civil rights. In 1958, the Supreme Court ruled that a citizens right to travel could not be taken away without due process and Robeson passport was returned.

----------------

Testimony of Paul Robeson before the House Committee on Un-American Activities, June 12, 1956

THE CHAIRMAN: The Committee will be in order. This morning the Committee resumes its series of hearings on the vital issue of the use of American passports as travel documents in furtherance of the objectives of the Communist conspiracy. . . .

Mr. ARENS: Now, during the course of the process in which you were applying for this passport, in July of 1954, were you requested to submit a non-Communist affidavit?

Mr. ROBESON: We had a long discussionwith my counsel, who is in the room, Mr. Boudinwith the State Department, about just such an affidavit and I was very precise not only in the application but with the State Department, headed by Mr. Henderson and Mr. McLeod, that under no conditions would I think of signing any such affidavit, that it is a complete contradiction of the rights of American citizens.

Mr. ARENS: Did you comply with the requests?

Mr. ROBESON: I certainly did not and I will not.

Mr. ARENS: Are you now a member of the Communist Party?

Mr. ROBESON: Oh please, please, please.

Mr. SCHERER: Please answer, will you, Mr. Robeson?

Mr. ROBESON: What is the Communist Party? What do you mean by that?

Mr. SCHERER: I ask that you direct the witness to answer the question.

Mr. ROBESON: What do you mean by the Communist Party? As far as I know it is a legal party like the Republican Party and the Democratic Party. Do you mean a party of people who have sacrificed for my people, and for all Americans and workers, that they can live in dignity? Do you mean that party?

Mr. ARENS: Are you now a member of the Communist Party?

Mr. ROBESON: Would you like to come to the ballot box when I vote and take out the ballot and see?

Mr. ARENS: Mr. Chairman, I respectfully suggest that the witness be ordered and directed to answer that question.

THE CHAIRMAN: You are directed to answer the question.

(The witness consulted with his counsel. )

Mr. ROBESON: I stand upon the Fifth Amendment of the American Constitution.

Mr. ARENS: Do you mean you invoke the Fifth Amendment?

Mr. ROBESON: I invoke the Fifth Amendment.

Mr. ARENS: Do you honestly apprehend that if you told this Committee truthfully

Mr. ROBESON: I have no desire to consider anything. I invoke the Fifth Amendment, and it is none of your business what I would like to do, and I invoke the Fifth Amendment. And forget it.

THE CHAIRMAN: You are directed to answer that question.

MR, ROBESON: I invoke the Fifth Amendment, and so I am answering it, am I not?

Mr. ARENS: I respectfully suggest the witness be ordered and directed to answer the question as to whether or not he honestly apprehends, that if he gave us a truthful answer to this last principal question, he would be supplying information which might be used against him in a criminal proceeding.

(The witness consulted with his counsel. )

THE CHAIRMAN: You are directed to answer that question, Mr. Robeson.

Mr. ROBESON: Gentlemen, in the first place, wherever I have been in the world, Scandinavia, England, and many places, the first to die in the struggle against Fascism were the Communists and I laid many wreaths upon graves of Communists. It is not criminal, and the Fifth Amendment has nothing to do with criminality. The Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, Warren, has been very clear on that in many speeches, that the Fifth Amendment does not have anything to do with the inference of criminality. I invoke the Fifth Amendment.

Mr. ARENS: Have you ever been known under the name of John Thomas?

Mr. ROBESON: Oh, please, does somebody here wantare you suggestingdo you want me to be put up for perjury some place? John Thomas! My name is Paul Robeson, and anything I have to say, or stand for, I have said in public all over the world, and that is why I am here today.

Mr. SCHERER: I ask that you direct the witness to answer the question. He is making a speech.

Mr. FRIEDMAN: Excuse me, Mr. Arens, may we have the photographers take their pictures, and then desist, because it is rather nerve-racking for them to be there.

THE CHAIRMAN: They will take the pictures.

Mr. ROBESON: I am used to it and I have been in moving pictures. Do you want me to pose for it good? Do you want me to smile? I cannot smile when I am talking to him.

Mr. ARENS: I put it to you as a fact, and ask you to affirm or deny the fact, that your Communist Party name was John Thomas.

Mr. ROBESON: I invoke the Fifth Amendment. This is really ridiculous.

Mr. ARENS: Now, tell this Committee whether or not you know Nathan Gregory Silvermaster.

Mr. SCHERER: Mr. Chairman, this is not a laughing matter.

Mr. ROBESON: It is a laughing matter to me, this is really complete nonsense.

Mr. ARENS: Have you ever known Nathan Gregory Silvermaster?

(The witness consulted with his counsel. )

Mr. ROBESON: I invoke the Fifth Amendment.

Mr. ARENS: Do you honestly apprehend that if you told whether you know Nathan Gregory Silvermaster you would be supplying information that could be used against you in a criminal proceeding?

Mr. ROBESON: I have not the slightest idea what you are talking about. I invoke the Fifth

Mr. ARENS: I suggest, Mr. Chairman, that the witness be directed to answer that question.

THE CHAIRMAN: You are directed to answer the question.

Mr. ROBESON: I invoke the Fifth.

Mr. SCHERER: The witness talks very loud when he makes a speech, but when he invokes the Fifth Amendment I cannot hear him.

Mr. ROBESON: I invoked the Fifth Amendment very loudly. You know I am an actor, and I have medals for diction.

. . . .

Mr. ROBESON: Oh, gentlemen, I thought I was here about some passports.

Mr. ARENS: We will get into that in just a few moments.

Mr. ROBESON: This is complete nonsense.

. . . .

THE CHAIRMAN: This is legal. This is not only legal but usual. By a unanimous vote, this Committee has been instructed to perform this very distasteful task.

Mr. ROBESON: To whom am I talking?

THE CHAIRMAN: You are speaking to the Chairman of this Committee.

Mr. ROBESON: Mr. Walter?

THE CHAIRMAN: Yes.

Mr. ROBESON: The Pennsylvania Walter?

THE CHAIRMAN: That is right.

Mr. ROBESON: Representative of the steelworkers?

THE CHAIRMAN: That is right.

Mr. ROBESON: Of the coal-mining workers and not United States Steel, by any chance? A great patriot.

THE CHAIRMAN: That is right.

Mr. ROBESON: You are the author of all of the bills that are going to keep all kinds of decent people out of the country.

THE CHAIRMAN: No, only your kind.

Mr. ROBESON: Colored people like myself, from the West Indies and all kinds. And just the Teutonic Anglo-Saxon stock that you would let come in.

THE CHAIRMAN: We are trying to make it easier to get rid of your kind, too.

Mr. ROBESON: You do not want any colored people to come in?

THE CHAIRMAN: Proceed. . . .

Mr. ROBESON: Could I say that the reason that I am here today, you know, from the mouth of the State Department itself, is: I should not be allowed to travel because I have struggled for years for the independence of the colonial peoples of Africa. For many years I have so labored and I can say modestly that my name is very much honored all over Africa, in my struggles for their independence. That is the kind of independence like Sukarno got in Indonesia. Unless we are double-talking, then these efforts in the interest of Africa would be in the same context. The other reason that I am here today, again from the State Department and from the court record of the court of appeals, is that when I am abroad I speak out against the injustices against the Negro people of this land. I sent a message to the Bandung Conference and so forth. That is why I am here. This is the basis, and I am not being tried for whether I am a Communist, I am being tried for fighting for the rights of my people, who are still second-class citizens in this United States of America. My mother was born in your state, Mr. Walter, and my mother was a Quaker, and my ancestors in the time of Washington baked bread for George Washingtons troops when they crossed the Delaware, and my own father was a slave. I stand here struggling for the rights of my people to be full citizens in this country. And they are not. They are not in Mississippi. And they are not in Montgomery, Alabama. And they are not in Washington. They are nowhere, and that is why I am here today. You want to shut up every Negro who has the courage to stand up and fight for the rights of his people, for the rights of workers, and I have been on many a picket line for the steelworkers too. And that is why I am here today. . . .

Mr. ARENS: Did you make a trip to Europe in 1949 and to the Soviet Union?

Mr. ROBESON: Yes, I made a trip. To England. And I sang.

Mr. ARENS: Where did you go?

Mr. ROBESON: I went first to England, where I was with the Philadelphia Orchestra, one of two American groups which was invited to England. I did a long concert tour in England and Denmark and Sweden, and I also sang for the Soviet people, one of the finest musical audiences in the world. Will you read what the Porgy and Bess people said? They never heard such applause in their lives. One of the most musical peoples in the world, and the great composers and great musicians, very cultured people, and Tolstoy, and

THE CHAIRMAN: We know all of that.

Mr. ROBESON: They have helped our culture and we can learn a lot.

Mr. ARENS: Did you go to Paris on that trip?

Mr. ROBESON: I went to Paris.

Mr. ARENS: And while you were in Paris, did you tell an audience there that the American Negro would never go to war against the Soviet government?

Mr. ROBESON: May I say that is slightly out of context? May I explain to you what I did say? I remember the speech very well, and the night before, in London, and do not take the newspaper, take me: I made the speech, gentlemen, Mr. So-and-So. It happened that the night before, in London, before I went to Paris . . . and will you please listen?

Mr. ARENS: We are listening.

Mr. ROBESON: Two thousand students from various parts of the colonial world, students who since then have become very important in their governments, in places like Indonesia and India, and in many parts of Africa, two thousand students asked me and Mr. Dadoo, a leader of the Indian people in South Africa, when we addressed this conference, and remember I was speaking to a peace conference, they asked me and Mr. Dadoo to say there that they were struggling for peace, that they did not want war against anybody. Two thousand students who came from populations that would range to six or seven hundred million people.

Mr. KEARNEY: Do you know anybody who wants war?

Mr. ROBESON: They asked me to say in their name that they did not want war. That is what I said. No part of my speech made in Paris says fifteen million American Negroes would do anything. I said it was my feeling that the American people would struggle for peace, and that has since been underscored by the President of these United States. Now, in passing, I said

Mr. KEARNEY: Do you know of any people who want war?

Mr. ROBESON: Listen to me. I said it was unthinkable to me that any people would take up arms, in the name of an Eastland, to go against anybody. Gentlemen, I still say that. This United States Government should go down to Mississippi and protect my people. That is what should happen.

THE CHAIRMAN: Did you say what was attributed to you?

Mr. ROBESON: I did not say it in that context.

Mr. ARENS: I lay before you a document containing an article, I Am Looking for Full Freedom, by Paul Robeson, in a publication called the Worker , dated July 3, 1949.

At the Paris Conference I said it was unthinkable that the Negro people of America or elsewhere in the world could be drawn into war with the Soviet Union.

Mr. ROBESON: Is that saying the Negro people would do anything? I said it is unthinkable. I did not say that there : I said that in the Worker .

Mr. ARENS:

I repeat it with hundredfold emphasis: they will not.

Did you say that?

Mr. ROBESON: I did not say that in Paris, I said that in America. And, gentlemen, they have not yet done so, and it is quite clear that no Americans, no people in the world probably, are going to war with the Soviet Union. So I was rather prophetic, was I not?

Mr. ARENS: On that trip to Europe, did you go to Stockholm?

Mr. ROBESON: I certainly did, and I understand that some people in the American Embassy tried to break up my concert. They were not successful.

Mr. ARENS: While you were in Stockholm, did you make a little speech?

Mr. ROBESON: I made all kinds of speeches, yes.

Mr. ARENS: Let me read you a quotation.

Mr. ROBESON: Let me listen.

Mr. ARENS: Do so, please.

Mr. ROBESON: I am a lawyer.

Mr. KEARNEY: It would be a revelation if you would listen to counsel.

Mr. ROBESON: In good company, I usually listen, but you know people wander around in such fancy places. Would you please let me read my statement at some point?

THE CHAIRMAN: We will consider your statement.

Mr. ARENS:

I do not hesitate one second to state clearly and unmistakably: I belong to the American resistance movement which fights against American imperialism, just as the resistance movement fought against Hitler.

Mr. ROBESON: Just like Frederick Douglass and Harriet Tubman were underground railroaders, and fighting for our freedom, you bet your life.

THE CHAIRMAN: I am going to have to insist that you listen to these questions.

MR, ROBESON: I am listening.

Mr. ARENS:

If the American warmongers fancy that they could win Americas millions of Negroes for a war against those countries (i.e., the Soviet Union and the peoples democracies) then they ought to understand that this will never be the case. Why should the Negroes ever fight against the only nations of the world where racial discrimination is prohibited, and where the people can live freely? Never! I can assure you, they will never fight against either the Soviet Union or the peoples democracies.

Did you make that statement?

Mr. ROBESON: I do not remember that. But what is perfectly clear today is that nine hundred million other colored people have told you that they will not. Four hundred million in India, and millions everywhere, have told you, precisely, that the colored people are not going to die for anybody: they are going to die for their independence. We are dealing not with fifteen million colored people, we are dealing with hundreds of millions.

Mr. KEARNEY: The witness has answered the question and he does not have to make a speech. . . .

Mr. ROBESON: In Russia I felt for the first time like a full human being. No color prejudice like in Mississippi, no color prejudice like in Washington. It was the first time I felt like a human being. Where I did not feel the pressure of color as I feel in this Committee today.

Mr. SCHERER: Why do you not stay in Russia?

Mr. ROBESON: Because my father was a slave, and my people died to build this country, and I am going to stay here, and have a part of it just like you. And no Fascist-minded people will drive me from it. Is that clear? I am for peace with the Soviet Union, and I am for peace with China, and I am not for peace or friendship with the Fascist Franco, and I am not for peace with Fascist Nazi Germans. I am for peace with decent people.

Mr. SCHERER: You are here because you are promoting the Communist cause.

Mr. ROBESON: I am here because I am opposing the neo-Fascist cause which I see arising in these committees. You are like the Alien Sedition Act, and Jefferson could be sitting here, and Frederick Douglass could be sitting here, and Eugene Debs could be here.

. . . .

THE CHAIRMAN: Now, what prejudice are you talking about? You were graduated from Rutgers and you were graduated from the University of Pennsylvania. I remember seeing you play football at Lehigh.

Mr. ROBESON: We beat Lehigh.

THE CHAIRMAN: And we had a lot of trouble with you.

Mr. ROBESON: That is right. DeWysocki was playing in my team.

THE CHAIRMAN: There was no prejudice against you. Why did you not send your son to Rutgers?

Mr. ROBESON: Just a moment. This is something that I challenge very deeply, and very sincerely: that the success of a few Negroes, including myself or Jackie Robinson can make upand here is a study from Columbia Universityfor seven hundred dollars a year for thousands of Negro families in the South. My father was a slave, and I have cousins who are sharecroppers, and I do not see my success in terms of myself. That is the reason my own success has not meant what it should mean: I have sacrificed literally hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of dollars for what I believe in.

Mr. ARENS: While you were in Moscow, did you make a speech lauding Stalin?

Mr. ROBESON: I do not know.

Mr. ARENS: Did you say, in effect, that Stalin was a great man, and Stalin had done much for the Russian people, for all of the nations of the world, for all working people of the earth? Did you say something to that effect about Stalin when you were in Moscow?

Mr. ROBESON: I cannot remember.

Mr. ARENS: Do you have a recollection of praising Stalin?

Mr. ROBESON: I said a lot about Soviet people, fighting for the peoples of the earth.

Mr. ARENS: Did you praise Stalin?

Mr. ROBESON: I do not remember.

Mr. ARENS: Have you recently changed your mind about Stalin?

Mr. ROBESON: Whatever has happened to Stalin, gentlemen, is a question for the Soviet Union, and I would not argue with a representative of the people who, in building America, wasted sixty to a hundred million lives of my people, black people drawn from Africa on the plantations. You are responsible, and your forebears, for sixty million to one hundred million black people dying in the slave ships and on the plantations, and dont ask me about anybody, please.

Mr. ARENS: I am glad you called our attention to that slave problem. While you were in Soviet Russia, did you ask them there to show you the slave labor camps?

THE CHAIRMAN: You have been so greatly interested in slaves, I should think that you would want to see that.

Mr. ROBESON: The slaves I see are still in a kind of semiserfdom. I am interested in the place I am, and in the country that can do something about it. As far as I know, about the slave camps, they were Fascist prisoners who had murdered millions of the Jewish people, and who would have wiped out millions of the Negro people, could they have gotten a hold of them. That is all I know about that.

Mr. ARENS: Tell us whether or not you have changed your opinion in the recent past about Stalin.

Mr. ROBESON: I have told you, mister, that I would not discuss anything with the people who have murdered sixty million of my people, and I will not discuss Stalin with you.

Mr. ARENS: You would not, of course, discuss with us the slave labor camps in Soviet Russia.

Mr. ROBESON: I will discuss Stalin when I may be among the Russian people some day, singing for them, I will discuss it there. It is their problem.

. . . .

Mr. ARENS: Now I would invite your attention, if you please, to the Daily Worker of June 29, 1949, with reference to a get-together with you and Ben Davis. Do you know Ben Davis?

Mr. ROBESON: One of my dearest friends, one of the finest Americans you can imagine, born of a fine family, who went to Amherst and was a great man.

THE CHAIRMAN: The answer is yes?

Mr. ROBESON: Nothing could make me prouder than to know him.

THE CHAIRMAN: That answers the question.

Mr. ARENS: Did I understand you to laud his patriotism?

Mr. ROBESON: I say that he is as patriotic an American as there can be, and you gentlemen belong with the Alien and Sedition Acts, and you are the nonpatriots, and you are the un-Americans, and you ought to be ashamed of yourselves.

THE CHAIRMAN: Just a minute, the hearing is now adjourned.

Mr. ROBESON: I should think it would be.

THE CHAIRMAN: I have endured all of this that I can.

Mr. ROBESON: Can I read my statement?

THE CHAIRMAN: No, you cannot read it. The meeting is adjourned.

Mr. ROBESON: I think it should be, and you should adjourn this forever, that is what I would say. . . .

Source: Congress, House, Committee on Un-American Activities, Investigation of the Unauthorized Use of U.S. Passports , 84th Congress, Part 3, June 12, 1956; in Thirty Years of Treason: Excerpts from Hearings Before the House Committee on Un-American Activities, 19381968 , Eric Bentley, ed. (New York: Viking Press, 1971), 770.

http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/6440/
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joeybee12 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-22-03 07:22 AM
Response to Original message
1. Good for him!
You do realize that these hearings took place at a time when the Repukes controlled both the House and Senate!
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Q Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-22-03 07:29 AM
Response to Reply #1
2. Yes...he was a very brave man...
...against a very powerful 'committee'. (Lynch mob)
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eileen_d Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-22-03 07:32 AM
Response to Original message
3. A great man.
Edited on Wed Oct-22-03 07:33 AM by eileen_d
I remember being assigned to read a biography of Robeson in college, and being quite ignorant of what he had done besides sing. Every student in America should know his name and his history.

Biography from PBS
http://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/database/robeso...

Paul Robeson Timeline
http://www.rutgers.edu/robeson/main.html

Paul Robeson on the Web
http://www.princeton.lib.nj.us/robeson/links.html

Paul Robeson Theatre, Buffalo NY
http://www.paulrobesontheatre.com /
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Mairead Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Oct-23-03 06:59 AM
Response to Reply #3
23. A great, great man indeed. One of the finest the USA has produced.
I've often wondered what he would have achieved had he decided to practice law for his living, instead of becoming a professional singer.
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Q Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-22-03 07:36 AM
Response to Original message
4. Interesting excerpt:
Mr. ROBESON: To whom am I talking?

THE CHAIRMAN: You are speaking to the Chairman of this Committee.

Mr. ROBESON: Mr. Walter?

THE CHAIRMAN: Yes.

Mr. ROBESON: The Pennsylvania Walter?

THE CHAIRMAN: That is right.

Mr. ROBESON: Representative of the steelworkers?

THE CHAIRMAN: That is right.

Mr. ROBESON: Of the coal-mining workers and not United States Steel, by any chance? A great patriot.

THE CHAIRMAN: That is right.

Mr. ROBESON: You are the author of all of the bills that are going to keep all kinds of decent people out of the country.

THE CHAIRMAN: No, only your kind.

Mr. ROBESON: Colored people like myself, from the West Indies and all kinds. And just the Teutonic Anglo-Saxon stock that you would let come in.

THE CHAIRMAN: We are trying to make it easier to get rid of your kind, too.

Mr. ROBESON: You do not want any colored people to come in?

THE CHAIRMAN: Proceed. . . .
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KG Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-22-03 07:36 AM
Response to Original message
5. were that there were more such men
Edited on Wed Oct-22-03 07:40 AM by KG
to stand up for what they believe, to thumb their noses at those that cast ridiculous aspersions there way, and eloquently put those scoudrels that wrap themselves in 'patriotism' in their place.

willing to pay the price to do the right thing, rather than do what's expedient.

every democrat on capitol hill could take a lesson from this man.
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demnan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-22-03 07:38 AM
Response to Original message
6. Sometime you should catch a recording of "Old Man River"
with Paul Robeson singing. He really gave meaning to that song. It's a must hear for the younger generation who are unfamiliar with this great singer.
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Brewman_Jax Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-22-03 07:39 AM
Response to Original message
7. An excellent read
Thanks for the transcript--had to bookmark this. I would like to have seen the proceedings in person. Takes a lot of guts to stand up to an committee that thinks little of you and cares nothing for your rights.

P.S. Thanks for the link, too. :thumbsup:
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GCP Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-22-03 07:40 AM
Response to Original message
8. What a great man
These hearings should be re-printed or dramatized on TV to show how we are yet again repeating history.

I can just imagine Ashcroft holding hearings like this against anyone who doesn't agree with his lunacy, just like this happened in the 50s.

Mr. ROBESON: I say that he is as patriotic an American as there can be, and you gentlemen belong with the Alien and Sedition Acts, and you are the nonpatriots, and you are the un-Americans, and you ought to be ashamed of yourselves.

Bravo. Mr. Robeson, you were a true patriot.
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The Bish Donating Member (28 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-22-03 08:13 AM
Response to Reply #8
9. Robeson's hearing isn't
But there is video and audio of William Mandel's testimony before the HUAC and MacCarthy at his website http://www.billmandel.net/h/HUAC.shtml Also a very good and important testimony.
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GCP Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-22-03 08:18 AM
Response to Reply #9
10. Welcome to DU, Bish
:hi:
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Iverson Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-22-03 09:50 AM
Response to Original message
11. Who would stand up for him today?
Thank you for finding and posting this. I am indebted, Q.

Now, my question to all is this: who among us would stand up for Paul Robeson today? Though it would make me plenty scared, I would.

I get the feeling that standing up to fascist wannabees is still unpopular, even here, but perhaps my fellow discussants can prove me wrong.
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Q Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-22-03 10:02 AM
Response to Reply #11
12. It's quite clear that very few stand up to the Bush* 'fascists'...
...even though they're using many of the same tactics as the HUAC.

- I can't quite explain it. Fear? Complicity? Cowardice?

- I fully expect there to be a new version of the HUAC to ferret out 'terrorists' if Bush* gets another term.
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sangh0 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-22-03 11:35 AM
Response to Reply #12
16. I guess the millions of protesters don't count
Edited on Wed Oct-22-03 11:38 AM by sangh0
And Robeson is not a politician

And what about the human shields who went to Iraq and risked their lives? Don't they count?

And the young man who, in an act he characterizes as civil disobedience, smuggled boxcutters and other materials on board an airplane, in order to show Bush*'s failure to secure our airports, doesn't he count?
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David__77 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-22-03 10:11 AM
Response to Original message
13. Be sure to order the new stamp with him on it!
I was very happy to see that the USPS approved a stamp with him on it.
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ElsewheresDaughter Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-22-03 11:04 AM
Response to Original message
14. sigh....... we've just been traveling in a big phucking circle...
Edited on Wed Oct-22-03 11:07 AM by ElsewheresDaughter
technology changes but man will forever remain cave dwellers
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MrPrax Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-22-03 11:25 AM
Response to Original message
15. Sad that such courage
By Robeson and many others seem to have done little in hindsight.

With pigs like Coulter and other revisionists pissing on these true 'freedom-fighters', it makes the spectre of more HUAC type 'show' trials more palatable to the public imagination by suggesting there are presumeably 'limits' to political freedom.

If you notice today, the Statists have learned to have most of this stuff done in secret and so we don't even have grainy black and white records of these heros standing up to the drunks, sadists and powermongers
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Mairead Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Oct-23-03 07:11 AM
Response to Reply #15
24. .
Edited on Thu Oct-23-03 07:13 AM by Mairead

(edit) MrPrax, this really wasn't intended as a reply to you...I'm not sure what happened, so I'm moving it.
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Iverson Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-22-03 01:06 PM
Response to Original message
17. This deserves prominence.
Therefore, kick.

;-)
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Iverson Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-22-03 06:01 PM
Response to Reply #17
18. keeping it visible!
kick again
:thumbsup:
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iverglas Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-22-03 06:39 PM
Response to Original message
19. commemorating Robeson
An excellent thing to do.

http://www.workingtv.com/herewestand.html

VANCOUVER, SATURDAY MAY 18, 2002:

On May 18, 1952, in defiance of the authorities who refused to allow him to cross the border, Paul Robeson stood on the back of a flat bed truck on the US-Canada border and sang songs of defiance and solidarity to 40,000 people.

50 years later, on May 18, 2002 activists from both Canada and the United States, organized Here We Stand!, a free concert at the same location to commemorate the 1952 event.

The issues dear to Paul Robeson - social justice, freedom, and civil rights - are as pertinent now are they were then.


40,000 people in 1952.


(Forgive me, that website itself looks a little weird, but you can click to view concert highlights at that site, and particularly his performance of Joe Hill.)


http://www.lexisnexis.com/academic/guides/african_ameri...

In January 1952, Robeson was invited by the International Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers Union of British Columbia in Canada to address their annual convention in Vancouver. He agreed to attend, since American citizens did not, by law, require a passport to travel to Canada. He was stopped at the border, however, with the threat of a five-year jail sentence and a $10,000 fine. United States border patrols were further instructed to stop him "by any means necessary." Robeson resigned himself to address the meeting by telephone. In May of the same year, he returned to the border where he sang to a crowd of over 40,000 people gathered in the Peace Arch Park. The Peace Arch concerts were thereafter held in May of each year, in defiance of United States government censorship, from 1952 to 1956, when this travel ban was lifted.


Another interesting perspective on those days: http://www.cbc.ca/news/viewpoint/vp_zolf/20020715.html

.
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Q Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-22-03 06:51 PM
Response to Reply #19
20. This is part of what Robert Parry calls 'lost history'...
- When you put that together with the Average American's very short memory span...there's not much chance of this type of bravery and patriotism ever coming to the forefront.

- The Empire is in control now....and they're rewriting history.
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The Bish Donating Member (28 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-22-03 07:32 PM
Response to Reply #20
21. A song a few years ago...
One of the Billy Bragg/Wilco Mermaid Avenue songs was about Paul Robeson. It didn't make it onto either of the albums but was released on a few Demos I think. The title was My Thirty Thousand. Like all of the rest of the Mermaid Avenue songs (and Woddy Guthries songs) it's highly recomended.
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Iverson Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Oct-23-03 04:14 AM
Response to Reply #19
22. Thanks, iverglas!
I hope that the Thursday morning crowd takes note.

:-)
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Mairead Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Oct-23-03 07:15 AM
Response to Original message
25. How many who are praising Robeson are planning to vote for one
Edited on Thu Oct-23-03 07:18 AM by Mairead
of the 2 people he would have voted for: Al Sharpton or Dennis Kucinich? Step forward please.

Those who aren't: what is your praise worth, if you are not willing to act? You can't stand up for him anymore, but you can stand up for what he believed in: peace, freedom, rights, and prosperity for working people. Al and Dennis are the only ones clearly offering that; every one else is dissembling more or less successfully.

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ElsewheresDaughter Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Oct-23-03 07:39 AM
Response to Reply #25
26. Mairead indeed
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Matilda Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Oct-23-03 09:10 AM
Response to Original message
27. Thank you for posting that, I've never read it before.
One of my earliest musical memories is listening to the voice of
Paul Robeson when I was about four years old. I loved it, and would
ask my mother over and over to play "more Paul Robeson". Nobody can
sing "Old Man River" like him, nobody. Or "Deep River" either. But
then he could sing something romantic like "Drink To Me Only" and
make that his own too.

He was very much liked and respected in Australia, and I remember
him singing for the workers on the Opera House when work had just
begun on it. He was an idol of the trade union movement, of course,
and the trade union song "Joe Hill" is also always associated with
him.

He was a truly great man, and what happened to him was disgraceful.
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