You are viewing an obsolete version of the DU website which is no longer supported by the Administrators. Visit The New DU.
Democratic Underground Latest Greatest Lobby Journals Search Options Help Login
Google

Reply #13: Maybe it's useful at this point to look at some dictionary definitions. [View All]

Printer-friendly format Printer-friendly format
Printer-friendly format Email this thread to a friend
Printer-friendly format Bookmark this thread
Home » Discuss » General Discussion Donate to DU
No Elephants Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-17-13 04:57 AM
Response to Original message
13. Maybe it's useful at this point to look at some dictionary definitions.
I considered putting the dictionary definitions in the OP, but rejected that idea because my question was "what does 'progressive mean to you?'" It's easy to find out when it means to dictionary compiliers, not so easy to get individal definitions from people who do not make a living from words.

If you read the definitions, please bear in mind that, as to the definition of "progressive," no political party of which I have ever heard expressly advocated going backward or expressly opposes "progress;" and even conservatives do no expressly oppose gradual change for the better.

So even the dictionary definition of "progressive" is very Jello (impossible to nail down). This kind of bears out my assertion in the OP that the word seems to mean whatever the person saying it wants it to mean. So, "progressive" was the perfect choice for the DLC, which wanted to run Republicans as Demcrats, without letting any Democrat know what was happening to the Democratic Party.)


(LOL, let's start a new expression, as in "Well, that may sound good on the surface, but, if you try to think about it, it's really very Jello." "Courtney Love's fashion sensibility is very Jello." "His ethics are very Jello." I like it! "Very marshmallow" has a lot of applications, too. And we know that Jello often combines with marshmallows.)


The following contained quite a few surprises for me. Among other things, I am more radical than I might have thought. For example, I do like to go after the root of a problem and I have no problem whatever with rapid change for the better, as opposed to incremental or gradual change. (I do oppose precipitious change though, as in change without regard to consequences, including unintended consequences.)



conservatism

2. A political philosophy or attitude emphasizing respect for traditional institutions, distrust of government activism, and opposition to sudden change in the established order.

2. a political philosophy advocating the preservation of the best of the established order in society and opposing radical change

1. the disposition to retain what is established and to practice a policy of gradualism rather than abrupt change. Cf. radicalism.




progressive

Note: when I typed in "conservative," the free online dictionary gave me choices, one of which was "conservative (politics)." I clicked on that and got the definitions above, under "conservatism. I also got a "liberal (politics)" when I typed in "liberal."

However, when I typed in "progressive," I did not get a choice for "progressive (politics)." I tried typing in "progressivism," but got a paragraph that was clearly about the notion of progressivism of TR's day.


progressive (pr-grsv)
adj.
1. Moving forward; advancing.
2. Proceeding in steps; continuing steadily by increments: progressive change.
3. Promoting or favoring progress toward better conditions or new policies, ideas, or methods: a progressive politician; progressive business leadership.


n.
1. A person who actively favors or strives for progress toward better conditions, as in society or government.

progressive
adj
1. of or relating to progress
2. proceeding or progressing by steps or degrees
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (often capital) favouring or promoting political or social reform through government action, /b]or even revolution, to improve the lot of the majority a progressive policy



liberalism

liberalism (lbr--lzm, lbr-)
n.

2.
a. A political theory founded on the natural goodness of humans and the autonomy of the individual and favoring civil and political liberties, government by law with the consent of the governed, and protection from arbitrary authority.
b. often Liberalism The tenets or policies of a Liberal party.
3. An economic theory in favor of laissez-faire, the free market, and the gold standard. {huh?}
4. Liberalism
a. A 19th-century Protestant movement that favored free intellectual inquiry, stressed the ethical and humanitarian content of Christianity, and de-emphasized dogmatic theology.
b. A 19th-century Roman Catholic movement that favored political democracy and ecclesiastical reform but was theologically orthodox.


1. a political or social philosophy advocating the freedom of the individual, parliamentary legislatures, governmental assurances of civil liberties and individual rights, and nonviolent modification of institutions to permit continued individual and social progress.
2. the principles and practice of a liberal political party. liberalist, n., adj. liberalistic, adj.



radical

radical (rd-kl)
adj.
1. Arising from or going to a root or source; basic: proposed a radical solution to the problem.
2. Departing markedly from the usual or customary; extreme: radical opinions on education.
3. Favoring or effecting fundamental or revolutionary changes in current practices, conditions, or institutions: radical political views.


n.
1. One who advocates fundamental or revolutionary changes in current practices, conditions, or institutions: radicals seeking to overthrow the social order.



adj.
1. Arising from or going to a root or source; basic: proposed a radical solution to the problem.
2. Departing markedly from the usual or customary; extreme: radical opinions on education.
3. Favoring or effecting fundamental or revolutionary changes in current practices, conditions, or institutions: radical political views.
4. Linguistics Of or being a root: a radical form.

n.
1. One who advocates fundamental or revolutionary changes in current practices, conditions, or institutions: radicals seeking to overthrow the social order.

1. of, relating to, or characteristic of the basic or inherent constitution of a person or thing; fundamental a radical fault
2. concerned with or tending to concentrate on fundamental aspects of a matter; searching or thoroughgoing radical thought a radical re-examination
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) favouring or tending to produce extreme or fundamental changes in political, economic, or social conditions, institutions, habits of mind, etc a radical party


n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a person who favours extreme or fundamental change in existing institutions or in political, social, or economic conditions



revolutionary


adj
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) relating to or characteristic of a revolution
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) advocating or engaged in revolution
3. radically new or different a revolutionary method of making plastics
4. rotating or revolving






An explanation of what I did with the above definitions, so that I don't mislead anyone.



All definitions above are from the free online dictionary collects definitions from several dictionaries, publikshed by different publishers, though they originally appeared in other dictionaries. http;//www.thefreedictionary.com / So, for instance, the 3 definitions of 'conservatism" below originated in three different dictionaries, but all of which now appear at the link I just gavve.

If several definitions were given by any one dictionary, I tried to choose the one most relevant to a political philosopy, as opposed to, say, individual behavior, fashion, etc. I also deleted references to TR era progressives and to specific political parties in the U.S. and abroad that have or had the word "Progressive" in their names. I also deleted references to progressive tax rates. I also did not show where I deleted definitions and other material that I considered irrelevant to the topic.

But, everything is at freedictionary.com, if you have any question.

Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 

Home » Discuss » General Discussion Donate to DU

Powered by DCForum+ Version 1.1 Copyright 1997-2002 DCScripts.com
Software has been extensively modified by the DU administrators


Important Notices: By participating on this discussion board, visitors agree to abide by the rules outlined on our Rules page. Messages posted on the Democratic Underground Discussion Forums are the opinions of the individuals who post them, and do not necessarily represent the opinions of Democratic Underground, LLC.

Home  |  Discussion Forums  |  Journals |  Store  |  Donate

About DU  |  Contact Us  |  Privacy Policy

Got a message for Democratic Underground? Click here to send us a message.

© 2001 - 2011 Democratic Underground, LLC