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Reply #18: This is the important missing piece [View All]

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zipplewrath Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Feb-25-10 07:36 AM
Response to Reply #8
18. This is the important missing piece
It is very easy to draw similarities between the anti-war movement of the late 60's and early '70s, and this current bunch. I actually think it is wrong to mix the anti-war movement with the civil rights movement. Civil rights can date its way back into the '50s at the very least. The vast majority of it very peaceful. But the anti-war effort really brought to the fore folks like Abbey Hoffman. Riots and disruption were their stock and trade. But you rightly point out that the important distinction between those folks and these current tea bagger nuts, is the propensity and actual violence. We could discuss why, but in a VERY short time these nuts have done ALOT of killing.

And I would digress for a moment to complain about the mixing of several cultural phenomenons of the late '50s, the '60s, and the early '70s. There were AT LEAST 4 very separate "movements" at the time and although they were all liberal/progressive, they were distinct and independent.

1. Civil rights. Started before Martin Luther King got involved. Some would trace it back at least to Roosevelt. Predominately peaceful. A VERY mainstream movement, in the early days consisting often of area business men. By the time of the "Freedom rides", it was hugely mainstream.

2. Hippie/Flower Power. There are actually several subgroups of this movement. It was the free love crowd, and ultimately became the drug crowd. It was a counter-culture revolution. It was anything but mainstream. It was relatively small, and the vast majority were very young. Woodstock was it's crowning achievement, Altamont was its down fall.

3. Anti-war. Really did not get going at all until the mid '60s and really only became "main stream" leading into '67-'68. The degree to which it represented any majority is dubious. It became mainstream for 2 reasons, alot of kids didn't wat to get drafted, and alot of parents didn't want their kids going off to war. This is where Abbey Hoffman and alot of other folks got started. It was actually a very short period of time, basically over by 1972.

4. Radical Revolutionaries. This was very fringe, never had any political clout, and unfortunately was a serious blow to its connection to liberalism. It was the Weather Underground, the SLA, the Blank Panthers, and to some extent the whole Malcom X, Louis Farrakhan crowd, (although they'd probably complain about being mixed in here. I'm trying to draw broad similarities).

I will acknowledge that there were overlaps in all of these "movements" but mostly their common thread was that almost any "movement" will attract the dispossed, fringe, and just plain pissed off or lonely. And since they were all basically "liberal" you were going to see at least "sympathies" across the board. But the vague similarities the original post draws is mostly between #4 and the tea baggers, with a tad of #2. By any allusion to #1 or #3, it implies a much more "mainstream" condition of the tea baggers than can be defended.
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