You are viewing an obsolete version of the DU website which is no longer supported by the Administrators. Visit The New DU.
Democratic Underground Latest Greatest Lobby Journals Search Options Help Login
Google

Reply #36: No, "Limited Justis diction" means they can only hear certain cases [View All]

Printer-friendly format Printer-friendly format
Printer-friendly format Email this thread to a friend
Printer-friendly format Bookmark this thread
This topic is archived.
Home » Discuss » Archives » General Discussion (01/01/06 through 01/22/2007) Donate to DU
happyslug Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Sep-27-06 10:14 AM
Response to Reply #33
36. No, "Limited Justis diction" means they can only hear certain cases
The those cases are determined by the State Legislature. This is opposed to Courts of General Jurisdiction (i.e Common Pleas Court in Pennsylvania, the "Supreme Courts" of New York) which can hear any case (except cases barred to that court by the legislature for example Workmen's Comp claims which are handled by Workmen's Comp Courts).
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
  -Broken Benchs - Ex: Every woman needs a good pounding every now & then." WePurrsevere  Sep-25-06 09:24 AM   #0 
  - Good night, nurse! I lived in NYS (NYC, actually) for 38 years and  mcscajun   Sep-25-06 11:29 AM   #1 
  - I want to find out which states are the 29 others like NY. Once that's  WePurrsevere   Sep-25-06 04:49 PM   #15 
     - Ooh, I skipped over that little fact. Hope NJ isn't one of 'em, but  mcscajun   Sep-25-06 07:22 PM   #16 
        - Thank you very much for the link. It's a great starting point. This is an  WePurrsevere   Sep-26-06 08:15 AM   #26 
  - Jesus H. Christ on a pogo stick.  impeachdubya   Sep-25-06 11:34 AM   #2 
  - I disagree with you about "Welcome to Bush's America"  Jim Lane   Sep-26-06 06:59 AM   #25 
     - I was referring to a mindset.  impeachdubya   Sep-26-06 11:24 AM   #27 
        - Yes, I agree with you about the mindset.  Jim Lane   Sep-26-06 11:52 AM   #28 
  - district justices here do not need to be lawyers  tigereye   Sep-25-06 11:44 AM   #3 
  - Last itme I heard was Non-Lawyers need to take a Six Weeks Course  happyslug   Sep-27-06 10:12 AM   #35 
  - And the hell with the law.  madmusic   Sep-25-06 12:29 PM   #4 
  - Scalia thinks the same way... Here's his infamous quote  SoCalDem   Sep-25-06 01:43 PM   #7 
  - link to that quote (in case anyone doubts your post)  Bozita   Sep-25-06 01:47 PM   #8 
  - "harmless error"  madmusic   Sep-25-06 03:23 PM   #12 
  - I hate, hate, hate it when people use the term "common sense"  Iris   Sep-26-06 07:08 PM   #32 
  - There are judges  Marie26   Sep-25-06 12:31 PM   #5 
  - Recommended reading from the frontpage of today's NYT  Bozita   Sep-25-06 12:36 PM   #6 
  - District Justices in Pennsylvania have no requirements either  bleedingheart   Sep-25-06 01:49 PM   #9 
  - Were these folks appointed or elected?  bleedingheart   Sep-25-06 01:55 PM   #10 
  - Judges and court officials should never be elected, I think.  Donald Ian Rankin   Sep-25-06 03:57 PM   #13 
  - Yet judges (not only justices like this) are still elected in communities  mcscajun   Sep-25-06 07:27 PM   #19 
  - I like the idea of elected Judges.  happyslug   Sep-27-06 03:10 PM   #41 
  - They're elected into most if not all positions. In some areas a part  WePurrsevere   Sep-25-06 04:44 PM   #14 
  - They are elected. It's mentioned three times in the article.  mcscajun   Sep-25-06 07:26 PM   #18 
  - you know...I need better reading glasses...I read it but I was  bleedingheart   Sep-25-06 07:36 PM   #23 
  - These are elected Positions in both NY and PA.  happyslug   Sep-27-06 02:53 PM   #40 
  - holy fuck  WindRavenX   Sep-25-06 01:56 PM   #11 
  - Quite right.  mcscajun   Sep-25-06 07:28 PM   #21 
  - !  Solly Mack   Sep-25-06 07:25 PM   #17 
  - I've got an idea  kiahzero   Sep-25-06 07:27 PM   #20 
  - Not surprised at all by this...  cynatnite   Sep-25-06 07:32 PM   #22 
  - Check for your state here  mcscajun   Sep-25-06 07:40 PM   #24 
  - Does "Limited jurisdiction" always mean the judges are voted in  WePurrsevere   Sep-27-06 09:08 AM   #33 
     - No, "Limited Justis diction" means they can only hear certain cases  happyslug   Sep-27-06 10:14 AM   #36 
     - TY, I sort of thought so but I haven't been able to find the correct term  WePurrsevere   Sep-27-06 10:31 AM   #37 
        - Various names, the Common Law name was "Justice of the Peace"  happyslug   Sep-27-06 02:43 PM   #38 
     - "Limited jurisdiction" does not always mean judges voted in,  mcscajun   Sep-27-06 05:02 PM   #43 
  - WOW. I thought this thread was going to be about sexist remarks  135th   Sep-26-06 11:52 AM   #29 
  - So maybe some progressives could get elected to these benches?  eppur_se_muova   Sep-26-06 05:56 PM   #30 
  - It may sound odd but I wonder how many of us have voted for someone w/o  WePurrsevere   Sep-26-06 07:03 PM   #31 
  - Unbelievable article. These are petty tyrants!  Strawman   Sep-27-06 09:19 AM   #34 
  - Only 8 recs.  madmusic   Sep-27-06 02:49 PM   #39 
     - More like "Who's gonna fix it?"  Kagemusha   Sep-27-06 03:10 PM   #42 
 

Home » Discuss » Archives » General Discussion (01/01/06 through 01/22/2007) Donate to DU

Powered by DCForum+ Version 1.1 Copyright 1997-2002 DCScripts.com
Software has been extensively modified by the DU administrators


Important Notices: By participating on this discussion board, visitors agree to abide by the rules outlined on our Rules page. Messages posted on the Democratic Underground Discussion Forums are the opinions of the individuals who post them, and do not necessarily represent the opinions of Democratic Underground, LLC.

Home  |  Discussion Forums  |  Journals |  Store  |  Donate

About DU  |  Contact Us  |  Privacy Policy

Got a message for Democratic Underground? Click here to send us a message.

© 2001 - 2011 Democratic Underground, LLC