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Reply #3: Ruan Lufei - Hou Yifan, Final Round/Game 2 [View All]

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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Dec-25-10 08:36 PM
Response to Reply #2
3. Ruan Lufei - Hou Yifan, Final Round/Game 2



Hou Yifan
Photo by karpidis modified from flickr in Wikimedia Commons (Creative Commons License, Attribution/Share Alike)


Ruan Lufei - Hou Yifan
World Women's Championship, Final Round/Game 2
Antakya, 21 December 2010

Open Sicilian Game: Scheveningen Defense (Opocensky Opening)


1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 d6 6.Be2 Be7 7.0-0 Nc6 8.Be3 0-0 9.f4 e5

  • If 9...a6 10.a4 Qc7 11.Kh1 Re8 12.Bf3 then:
    • If 12...Rb8 then:
      • If 13.Qd2 Bd7 then:
        • If 14.Nb3 b6 then:
          • If 15.g4 Bc8 16.g5 Nd7 17.Bg2 Na5 then:
            • If 18.Qf2 then:
              • If 18...Nc4 19.Bc1 Bf8 20.Nd4 then:
                • If 20...Na5 21.f5 Ne5 22.Nce2 Nac6 then:
                  • 23.c3 exf5 24.exf5 Nxd4 25.Nxd4 gives White a slight advantage in space (Jansa-Ftacnik, Czechoslovakian Ch, Prague, 1989).
                  • 23.Ra3 Nxd4 24.Nxd4 exf5 25.Rc3 Qe7 gives White a slight advantage in space (Mokry-Horvath, Czechoslovakian Ch, Prague, 1989).
                • 20...Bb7 21.b3 Na5 22.Bb2 Nc6 23.Nf3 g6 24.Rad1 Bg7 is equal (Timoshenko-Lesiege, Op, Koszalin, 1999).
              • 18...Nxb3 19.cxb3 Nc5 20.Qc2 b5 21.axb5 axb5 is equal (Palac-Ftacnik, IT, Vinkovci, 1995).
            • 18.Nxa5 bxa5 19.b3 Bb7 20.Ne2 Rbc8 21.c4 Nc5 22.Bxc5 Qxc5 23.Ng3 Bf8 24.Rae1 Rb8 is equal (Radjabov-Svidler, Amber Blind, Monaco, 2005).
          • 15.Bf2 Bc8 16.Bg3 Nd7 17.e5 dxe5 18.Rae1 Bb7 19.fxe5 Ncxe5 20.Bxb7 Rxb7 is equal (Topalov-Anand, IT, Linares, 1999).
        • 14.Qf2 Nxd4 15.Bxd4 e5 16.Bb6 Qc4 17.Be2 Qc6 18.a5 exf4 19.Qxf4 gives White the advantage in space (Kuczynski -Jaworski, Polish ChT, Glagow, 2001).
      • If 13.g4 Nxd4 14.Bxd4 e5 15.fxe5 dxe5 16.Ba7 Ra8 17.g5 Rd8 18.Qe2 Ne8 19.Be3 Be6 20.Qf2 then:
        • If 20...Rdc8 then:
          • 21.Rad1 Bc5 22.Bxc5 Qxc5 23.Nd5 Bxd5 24.Rxd5 Qxc2 25.Rxe5 gives White a small advantage in space (Thinius-K.Szabo, 1st Saturday Feb, Budapest, 2005).
          • If 21.Bg4 then:
            • 21...Qc6 22.Bxe6 Qxe6 23.Nd5 Bd8 24.Bc5 Rc6 25.Nb4 Rcc8 26.Nd5 Rc6 27.Nb4 Rcc8 28.Nd5 Rc6 draw (Maliangkay-Elwert, Corres, 1998).
            • 21...Nd6 22.Bxe6 fxe6 23.g6 hxg6 24.Qg2 gives White healthier pawns and more active pieces (Xie Jun-Arakhamia, FIDE Knock Out W, Groningen, 1997).
      • 20...Qc4 21.Bb6 Rdc8 22.Be3 Bc5 23.Rad1 Bxe3 24.Qxe3 Qb4 gives Black a small advantage in space (Topalov-Kasparov, Ol, Yerevan, 1996).
  • If 12...Bf8 then:
    • If 13.Qd2 then:
      • If 13...Nd7 14.Qf2 Rb8 15.Rad1 Nb4 16.e5 dxe5 17.fxe5 Nxe5 gives White the advantage in space in compensation for her sacrificed pawn (Hou Yifan-Javakhashvili, Euro Club Cup W, Plovdiv, 2010).
      • If 13...Rb8 14.Qf2 e5 then:
        • 15.Nde2 b5 16.axb5 axb5 17.f5 Nb4 18.Ng3 Nxc2 19.Bg5 Nxa1 20.Bxf6 Qc5 21.Qd2 Nb3 leaves Black with the material advantage for the moment, but after 22.Qg5 White has the advantage in space and the active game in compensation (Jakovenko-Rublevsky, IT, Poikovsky, 2008).
  • If 13.Nb3 b6 14.a5 then:
    • 14...Nd7 15.axb6 Nxb6 16.Nb5 axb5 17.Bxb6 Qb8 18.Rxa8 Qxa8 19.Qe2 b4 20.Ra1 Qb7 21.Be3 gives White the advantage in space (Kovacevic-Stojanovic, TT, Herceg Novi, 2005).
    • 14...bxa5 15.e5 dxe5 16.fxe5 Rd8 17.Nd4 Nxd4 18.Bxd4 Bb7 19.exf6 e5 20.fxg7 Bxg7 21.Bxb7 Qxb7 22.Ne2 exd4 23.Ng3 Rd5 24.Nf5 gives White a well-posted Knight and stronger pawns in compensation for his pawn minus (Kovacevic-Jakovljevic, Op, Ljubljana, 2005).

10.Nxc6

  • If 10.Nb3 exf4 11.Bxf4 Be6 12.Kh1 d5 13.e5 Nd7 14.Nxd5 Ndxe5 then:
    • If 15.Nxe7+ Qxe7 16.Qe1 then:
      • 16...Rad8 17.Qg3 Ng6 18.Bg5 f6 is equal (Klovans-Tshevkovsky, IT, Riga, 1981).
      • 16...Ng6 17.Bg3 Rad8 18.Qf2 Bxb3 19.axb3 Rd2 gives Black the initiative (Gashimov-Ibrahimov, Azerbaijani Ch, 1999).
    • If 15.c4 Bg5 16.Nc5 Bxf4 then:
      • If 17.Nxe6 fxe6 18.Nxf4 then:
        • 18...Rf6 19.c5 Qd4 20.Qxd4 Nxd4 21.Nd3 Nc4 gives Black a slight initiative (Kindermann-van der Sterren, Bundesliga 9899, Germany, 1998).
        • 18...Qe7 19.Qb3 Nd4 20.Qe3 Nxe2 21.Qxe2 gives White a slight advantage with stronger pawns (Dolmatov-Psakhis, GMA Qual Final, Moscow, 1990).
      • 17.Rxf4 b6 18.Ne4 b5 19.b3 bxc4 20.Bxc4 Kh8 21.Qh5 Bxd5 22.Bxd5 Qxd5 23.Rh4 h6 24.Rd1 Qa5 25.b4 Qxb4 26.Nf6 Qe7 27.Rf1 Rfd8 White resigns (Geller-Kasparov, Moscow, 1981).

10...bxc6 11.Kh1

  • If 11.fxe5 dxe5 then:
    • If 12.Qe1 Be6 13.Qg3 then:
      • If 13...Qc7 14.Kh1 Kh8 15.Bg5 Rad8 16.Qh4 Ng8 17.Bg4 then:
        • 17...Bxg5 18.Qxg5 f6 gives Black a small advantage in space (Goldberg-Cifka, Bundesliga 0607, Germany, 2007).
        • 17...Bxg4 18.Qxg4 Bxg5 19.Qxg5 is equal.
      • 13...Qb8 14.Rab1 Kh8 15.Kh1 Qc7 16.Bg5 Rad8 17.Bf3 Ng8 18.Be3 Bb4 is equal (Schultze-Pfrommer, Bundesliga 9697, Germany, 1996).
    • 12.Qxd8 Rxd8 13.Rad1 Be6 14.Bf3 Rab8 15.Rb1 Ng4 16.Bxg4 Bxg4 17.h3 Be6 is equal (Prandsetter-Jansa, IT, Hradec Kralove, 1981).

11...exf4 12.Bxf4 Be6 13.Bf3

  • If 13.Qe1 Nd7 14.Rd1 Qc7 15.Qg3 Ne5 16.Na4 Rad8 17.b3 then:
    • 17...Ng6 18.Bc1 Kh8 is equal (Kryakvin-Bukavshin, Russian Ch HL, Irkutsk, 2010).
    • 17...f6 18.c4 Bf7 19.Bg4 gives White a slight advantage in space (Sikula-C. Balogh, Hungarian ChT 0809, Budapest, 2009).

13...Qb8

  • 13...Qb6 14.b3 Rad8 15.Qe1 Rfe8 16.Rd1 Bg4 17.Qe2 Qa5 18.Bd2 Qh5 is equal (Rodriguez-A. Sokolov, Potuguese ChT, Evora, 2006).

14.b3 Qb4

  • 14...a5 15.Ne2 c5 16.a4 Ra6 17.Nc3 c4 18.Nb5 Nd7 19.Bg4 Qc8 20.Bxe6 fxe6 21.Qe2 is equal (Kamsky-Zhou Weiqi, World Cup, Khanty-Mansiysk, 2009).

15.Qe1N

  • 15.Qd2 Rfd8 16.Rad1 Rac8 17.Qe3 d5 18.Be5 Qa5 19.exd5 Nxd5 20.Nxd5 cxd5 gives White a slight advantage in space (Svidler-Movsesian, Pearl Spring, Nanjing, 2008).

15...a5!?

  • White has the advantage in space.
  • 15...Rac8 16.a3 Qb6 17.e5 dxe5 18.Bxe5 gives White a slight advantage in space.

16.Rd1

  • If 16.e5! dxe5 17.Bxe5 then:
    • 17...Rad8 18.a3 Qb6 19.Qg3 maintains Whit's advantage in space.
    • 17...Nd5!? 18.Nxd5 cxd5 19.c4! gives White a fine game.

16...Rfe8!?

  • Having drawn the first game of the match the day before, Ms. Hou may want a win and is playing provacateur chess (a term from Andy Soltis in The Art of Defense in Chess.
  • 16...Rac8 17.Bd2 Qa3 18.Qg3 Nd7 19.Bc1 Qb4 20.Ne2 continues to give White a good advantage.

17.e5!

  • White will have a lsting advantage in space as a result of this move.

17...dxe5 18.Bxe5 Rac8

  • 18...Qb7 19.Qg3 Red8 20.a4 Rac8 gives White a very respectable advantage in space; White is cramped and should seek exchanges, but none are to be had at the moment.

19.Qg3 g6 20.Na4!?

  • White misses an opportunity to greatly improve her position.
  • I20.Bd4! Rcd8 21.a3 Qb7 22.Qe5 Bf5 23.Be4 gives White a solid center made entirely of pieces.

20...Nd5 21.Bxd5?!

  • White misses another opportunity and hands one to Black.
  • If 21.Bd4! c5 22.a3 then:
    • 22...Qb5 23.Ba1 Nf6 24.Qf2 c4 25.Nb6 Rc5 26.Nxc4 leaves White a pawn to the good.
    • If 22...Qxd4 23.Rxd4 cxd4 24.Bxd5 Bxd5 25.Nb6 then:
      • 25...Rc3 26.Qf2 Be6 27.Qxd4 Rxc2 28.Nd5 gives White a slight material advantage and a better center.
      • 25...Rcd8 26.Qe1 Bf8 27.Qxa5 Be4 28.c4 gives White the material advantage.

21...cxd5 22.Bc3 Qg4!?

  • Black isn't cramped for space and ther is no reason for her to exchange Queens.
  • 22...Qe4! 23.Qf2 Bh4 24.Qd2 Bf5 25.Rc1 Qe3 gives Black the advantage in space.

23.Qxg4 Bxg4 24.Rxd5 Bb4 25.Bxb4 axb4

  • The game is equal.

26.Rd2

  • 26.h3 Bf5 27.Rc5 Rxc5 28.Nxc5 Re2 29.Na6 is equal.

26...Bf5 27.Kg1!?

  • 27.Nb6 Rcd8 28.Nd5 Kf8 29.h3 Be4 remains equal.


BLACK: Hou Yifan



WHITE: Ruan Lufei
Position after 27.Kh1g1


27...Rxc2!

  • This is Black's only move.
  • If 27...Bxc2? then White wins after 28.Nb6! Rcd8 29.Rxc2.

28.Rxc2 Bxc2 29.Kf2

  • 29.Nc5 Rc8 30.Nd7 Rd8 31.Nc5 f5 leaves Black with a slim advantage in space.

29...Bd3!?

  • Black misses the move that improves his position and allows White to equalize.
  • If 29...g5! then after 30.Rc1 Bd3 31.Nc5 Re2+ 32.Kg3 Bb5! Black wins at least a pawn.

30.Re1?!

  • White tries exchanging Rooks, but the most aggressive move is to tickle the Bishop.
  • 30.Rd1 Bb5 31.Rd5 Rb8 32.Rd4 Bc6 33.g4 is equal.

30...Rc8! 31.Ke3

  • 31.Nb6 Rc2+ 32.Ke3 Bb5 33.g3 Rxh2 34.Kd4 Rxa2 gives Black two extra pawns.

31...Bb5 32.Rd1?!

  • White could hold White's advantage to a minimum, but instead allows Black to blow the game open.
  • If 32.Rb1 then:
    • 32...Rd8 33.Rb2 f5 34.Nb6 g5 35.Nc4 Ba6 leaves Black with a small advantage in space.
    • 32...Re8+!? 33.Kd4 Bxa4 34.bxa4 Re2 35.h4 Rxg2 36.Kc5 is equal.

32...Re8+!

  • The Rook storms its way to the seventh rank.

33.Kf4 Re2 34.g4?

  • This is the final nail in White's coffin.
  • White can fight uphill after 34.Nc5 Rxg2 35.Rd8+ Kg7 36.Rb8 g5+ 37.Kf5 Bf1.


BLACK: Hou Yifan



WHITE: Ruan Lufei
Position after 34.g2g4


34...Bxa4!

  • After the exchange, White's queenside pawns are Black's for a song.

35.bxa4 Rxa2 36.Rd4 Rxa4 37.h4

  • Black is two pawns to the good with pawn majorities on both wings. This is a winning position.

37...Kf8

  • A quicker win might start with 37...Kg7 38.Ke4 Ra3 39.Rxb4 Rh3.

38.Re4

  • If 38.Ke4 Kg7 39.Kd5 Kh6 40.Rf4 g5! then:
    • If 41.hxg5+ then Black wins after 41...Kxg5 42.Rxf7 h6 43.Rg7+ Kf6 44.Rh7 Kg6.
    • If 41.Rf6+ then 41...Kg7 42.hxg5 b3! 43.Rb6 Rxg4 wins.

38...f6 39.Rc4 Ke7 40.Rd4 Ke6 41.Ke4

  • No better is 41.h5 gxh5 42.gxh5 Ra5 43.Rxb4 Rxh5.

41...Ke7 42.Kf4 h6 43.h5 gxh5 44.gxh5 Kf7

  • Black prefers to win with the b-pawn.
  • An alternative is 44...Ra5 45.Rxb4 Rxh5 46.Rb7+ Ke6 47.Rb6+ Kf7 when Black will advance two pawns forward, but White will be able to use the Rook and King in a coordinated defense.

45.Re4 Kf8 46.Kg4

  • If 46.Kf5 then Black wins after 46...Ra5+ 47.Kxf6 Rb5.

46...f5+ 47.Kxf5 Ra5+ 48.Kg6

BLACK: Hou Yifan



WHITE: Ruan Lufei
Position after 48.Kf5g6


48...Ra6+

  • Black winning plan is easy enough to un understand:
    • Other than putting the Rook on the same rank (accomplished), waste no time protecting the pawn at h6;
    • Put the Rook behind the b-pawn.;
    • Capture the White h-pawn with the King;
    • With the assumption that Whille will maneuver her Rook to b1, advance the b-pawn to b2.;
    • Maneuver the King to c2, driving White's Rook from the queening square and queen the pawn.

49.Kh7 Rb6

  • Black's Rook is now in it ideal square where it protects both Black pawns.

50.Rf4+

  • This is a good move by White, even though her game is lost. She drives the Black King away from the h-pawn, but she cannot keep it there.

50...Ke7 51.Rf1 b3 52.Kg7

  • The White King will try to keep its counterpart away from the White pawn.

52...b2! 53.Rb1

  • Forced.

53...Ke6 54.Kxh6

BLACK: Hou Yifan



WHITE: Ruan Lufei
Position after 54.Kg7h6:p


54...Kf5+!

  • Absolutely perfect timing! The White King is forced back, barred from the center of action.

55.Kg7 Kg5 56.Kf7 Kxh5 57.Ke7 Kg4 58.Kd7 Kf3 59.Kc7 Rb3 0-1

  • The win is all "book": 60.Kc6 Ke4 61.Kc5 Kd3 62.Kd5 Kc2.
  • Ms. Ruan resigns.

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