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Reply #119: Here's Diodorus Siculus: [View All]

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struggle4progress Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Apr-20-11 04:54 PM
Response to Reply #113
119. Here's Diodorus Siculus:

On the gold mines on the farthest borders of Egypt and the working of the gold

... For the kings of Egypt gather together and condemn to the mining of the gold such as have been found guilty of some crime and captives of war, as well as those who have been accused unjustly and thrown into prison because of their anger, and not only such persons but occasionally all their relatives as well, by this means not only inflicting punishment upon those found guilty but also securing at the same time great revenues from their labours. And those who have been condemned in this way and they are a great multitude and are all bound in chains work at their task unceasingly both by day and throughout the entire night, enjoying no respite and being carefully cut off from any means of escape; since guards of foreign soldiers who speak a language different from theirs stand watch over them, so that not a man, either by conversation or by some contact of a friendly nature, is able to corrupt one of his keepers ... and at this task they labour without ceasing beneath the sternness and blows of an overseer ... And since no opportunity is afforded any of them to care for his body and they have no garment to cover their shame, no man can look upon unfortunate wretches without feeling pity for them because of the exceeding hardships they suffer. For no leniency or respite of any kind is given to any man who is sick, or maimed, or aged, or in the case of a woman for her weakness, but all without exception are compelled by blows to persevere in their labours, until through ill-treatment they die in the midst of their tortures. Consequently the poor unfortunates believe, because their punishment is so excessively severe, that the future will always be more terrible than the present and therefore look forward to death as more to be desired than life ... http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Roman/Texts/Diodo... *.html#12

The kind of abuse Diodorus describes has been common in world history: one sees slaves suffering so two millennia later on the Caribbean sugar plantations, and one sees war captives suffering so in quarries millennia earlier in Assyria. There's no good reason to think that the ancient Egyptian militarists, having taken war captives for slave labor, were any nicer

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