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Reply #7: Deliberate and thoughtful but disagreement prevailed. I read of the controversy over the two words [View All]

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jody Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Dec-06-07 03:27 PM
Response to Reply #6
7. Deliberate and thoughtful but disagreement prevailed. I read of the controversy over the two words
Edited on Thu Dec-06-07 03:37 PM by jody
years ago and after your comment browsed a dozen links that purported to tell the true story. The controversy still prevails.

My point is very simple that PA and VT both declared the right of "enjoying and defending life and liberty" to be a "natural, inherent" right and PA or VT or both declared that citizens could not give that right away by using either the word "inalienable", PA, or the word "unalienable", VT, or both to declare that condition.

You said "An 'unalienable' right cannot be transferred. You cannot transfer your life to someone else or your liberty or happiness. An 'inalienable' right, such as ownership of property or a title or a degree, can be transferred and governments can decide who owns property or has a title."

Accepting your definition that only "unalienable" means a right cannot be transferred, then Vermont's constitution proves my case that the right of "enjoying and defending life and liberty" cannot be transferred.

On the other hand if both PA and VT used the two words "inalienable" and "unalienable" to mean a right cannot be transferred, then both state constitutions prove my case that the right of "enjoying and defending life and liberty" cannot be transferred.

Either way, the right of "enjoying and defending life and liberty" cannot be transferred from a citizen and that fact was declared before the Articles of Confederation, Constitution, or Bill of Rights were adopted.

ON EDIT ADD
Our exchange raises an interesting question, if as you say the word "inalienable" used in the Declaration of Independence does not mean natural rights cannot be given away, then what is the basis for the belief that rights enumerated in the Bill of Rights cannot be given away?
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