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Response to Justice wanted (Original post)

Sat Mar 24, 2012, 10:31 PM

2. Never give up if it's your dream!

The text isn't bad. As for whether or not the book would sell, it's too little text to give an honest opinion on it or on plot, structure, etc.

Here is the process that I work with, maybe it will be of some help to you:

1. Write for yourself. Write the whole story all the way through without editing. Get everything out on the computer. Then go back and edit fixing anything grammatically you don't like until you can read the whole thing through without finding major mistakes. (You may end up going through it twenty or thirty times!)
2. Ask others to help you with grammar. EVEN those who are good with grammar need to do this when writing!
3. Revise, revise, revise. Look at the plot and structure of the story and make sure everything is doing exactly what it is supposed to (are characters acting like they should, is dialog well written, does the story get slow and boring at any point, etc.) Make changes that you think are necessary.
4. Rinse and repeat several times. Make sure that every sentence of the story should be there, every word was the right choice.
5. Put it down for a few weeks when you're "done" and completely forget about it (or try).
6. A few weeks or even months later, print it out and read it as if you were reading a book. Circle words, sentences, paragraphs, anything and EVERYTHING that doesn't sound perfect. But don't go back and correct them now. Just keep reading.
7. Then after reading it and circling, go back to each spot on the printout that you circled and review each one again. Add a notation to yourself as to why you circled it. If you now disagree with a circling, cross it out.
8. Fire up the computer and make your corrections. Review steps 2-7 until nothing substantive changes in your writing. (It could take several tries, but don't be discouraged. Every time you revise, your gem is polished that much brighter!)
9. Only once you are completely happy with the whole book and you've had a few people look at it for grammar issues and continuity problems (steps 2-8), do you want to print out a bunch of copies and hand them out to trusted friends. Ask for story feedback and not to focus on grammar. Specifically ask them for: 1 thing that worked for them, 1 thing that didn't work, and 1 way to improve EVERY chapter in the book.
10. Take all of their feedback to heart and go back to step 2 and work your way through again. At that point I would start researching the publishing process and then looking for literary agents, if and only if you have several favorable reviews. If you have very unfavorable reviews, don't take it personally, ask for input on how they would fix the issues they have with the story. (You may agree or disagree with their suggestions.)

But most importantly: ALWAYS WRITE BECAUSE YOU LOVE TO WRITE. DON'T STOP BECAUSE OTHERS TELL YOU NOT TO WRITE! There are no guarantees that you will publish, but you should enjoy the entire process and not focus on the end result. It's the journey, not the destination that is magical.

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