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Response to hedgehog (Original post)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 04:25 PM

19. There's no corn syrup where I am, so here's my substitute

This makes about 2 cups and takes about an hour

2 cups white sugar
1 1/2 cup water
1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar
1 pinch salt

Place all the ingredients in a large saucepan and bring to a boil, stirring constantly.

Reduce heat to a simmer and put cover for a few minutes so sugar crystals won't form on the sides of the pan. This is very important.

Uncover, keep stirring on a simmer until it reaches the soft ball stage.

Cool and store in a covered container at room temperature.



Whatever you do, don't skip the cream of tartar because that's what breaks down the sugar into fructose and glucose:

Sucrose is actually two simpler sugars stuck together: fructose and glucose. In recipes, a little bit of acid (for example, some lemon juice or cream of tartar) will cause sucrose to break down into these two components.

...

One way to prevent the crystallization of sucrose in candy is to make sure that there are other types of sugar—usually, fructose and glucose—to get in the way. Large crystals of sucrose have a harder time forming when molecules of fructose and glucose are around. Crystals form something like Legos locking together, except that instead of Lego pieces, there are molecules. If some of the molecules are a different size and shape, they won’t fit together, and a crystal doesn’t form.

A simple way to get other types of sugar into the mix is to "invert" the sucrose (the basic white sugar you know well) by adding an acid to the recipe. Acids such as lemon juice or cream of tartar cause sucrose to break up (or invert) into its two simpler components, fructose and glucose. Another way is to add a nonsucrose sugar, such as corn syrup, which is mainly glucose. Some lollipop recipes use as much as 50% corn syrup; this is to prevent sugar crystals from ruining the texture.

...

http://www.exploratorium.edu/cooking/candy/sugar.html

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hedgehog Oct 2012 OP
Melissa G Oct 2012 #1
sarge43 Oct 2012 #2
cbayer Oct 2012 #3
msanthrope Oct 2012 #4
HappyMe Oct 2012 #5
hedgehog Oct 2012 #6
Warpy Oct 2012 #7
Major Nikon Oct 2012 #9
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Major Nikon Oct 2012 #8
Phentex Oct 2012 #12
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pipoman Oct 2012 #17
TreasonousBastard Oct 2012 #10
Major Nikon Oct 2012 #14
TreasonousBastard Oct 2012 #11
no_hypocrisy Oct 2012 #18
LineNew Reply There's no corn syrup where I am, so here's my substitute
Catherina Oct 2012 #19
Major Nikon Oct 2012 #20
Catherina Oct 2012 #21
kestrel91316 Oct 2012 #22
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