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Response to jpak (Original post)

Sun May 6, 2012, 04:58 PM

3. Nuclear “Renaissance” Meets Economic Reality, But Who Gets the Bill?

Nuclear “Renaissance” Meets Economic Reality, But Who Gets the Bill?
By: Gregg Levine Friday February 24, 2012 10:15 am

Crystal River is back in the news. Regular readers will recall when last we visited Progress Energy Florida’s (PEF) troubled nuclear reactor it was, shall we say, hooked on crack:
The Crystal River story is long and sordid. The containment building cracked first during its construction in 1976. ...The latest problems started when Crystal River needed to replace the steam generator inside the containment building. Rather than use an engineering firm like Bechtel or SGT–the companies that had done the previous 34 such replacements in the US–Progress decided it would save a few bucks and do the job itself.

Over the objections of on-site workers....



Sara Barczak of CleanEnergy Footprints provides more detail on the last couple of years:
The Crystal River reactor has been plagued with problems ever since PEF self-managed a steam generation replacement project in September 2009. The replacement project was intended to last 3 months, until PEF informed the Commission that it had cracked the containment structure during the detensioning phase of the project. PEF subsequently announced that the CR3 reactor would be repaired and back in service by the 3rd quarter of 2010…then by the 4th quarter of 2010…and then by the first quarter of 2011. On March 15, 2011 PEF informed the Commission that it had cracked the reactor again during the retensioning process and subsequently told the Commission that it estimated repair costs of $1.3 billion and a return to service in 2014. Shortly thereafter, the Humpty Dumpty Crystal River reactor suffered yet another crack on July 26, 2011.



That July crack was later revealed to be 12-feet long and 4-feet wide–and here, at least when it came to notifying the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, “later” means much later. . . like four months later.

...


http://my.firedoglake.com/gregglevine/2012/02/24/nuclear-renaissance-meets-economic-reality-but-who-gets-the-bill/

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