HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Topics » Economy & Education » Economy (Group) » STOCK MARKET WATCH -- Mon... » Reply #20

Response to Tansy_Gold (Reply #14)

Mon Apr 2, 2012, 09:15 AM

20. Watch out!

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judith_Beheading_Holofernes



The account of the beheading of Holofernes by Judith is given in the deuterocanonical book of Judith, and is the subject of numerous depictions in painting and sculpture. In the story, Judith, a beautiful widow, is able to enter the tent of Holofernes because of his desire for her. Holofernes was an Assyrian general who was about to destroy Judith's home, the city of Bethulia, though the story is emphatic that no "defilement" takes place. Overcome with drink, he passes out and is decapitated by Judith; his head is taken away in a basket (often depicted as carried by an elderly female servant).

Artists have mainly chosen one of two possible scenes (with or without the servant): the decapitation, with Holofernes prone on the bed, or the heroine holding or carrying the head. An exception is an early sixteenth-century stained glass window with two scenes. The central scene, by far the larger of the two, features Judith and Holofernes seated at a banquet. The smaller background scene has Judith and her servant stick Holofernes' head in a sack, the headless body standing behind with his arm waving helplessly.

In European art, Judith is very often accompanied by her maid at her shoulder, which helps to distinguish her from Salome, who also carries her victim's head on a silver charger (plate). However, a Northern tradition developed whereby Judith had both a maid and a charger, famously taken by Erwin Panofsky as an example of the knowledge needed in the study of iconography. For many artists and scholars, Judith's sexualized femininity interestingly and sometimes contradictorily combined with her masculine aggression. Judith was one of the virtuous women whom Van Beverwijck mentioned in his published apology (1639) for the superiority of women to men, and a common example of the Power of Women iconographic theme in the Northern Renaissance.

Reply to this post

Back to OP Alert abuse Link to post in-thread

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 48 replies Author Time Post
Tansy_Gold Apr 2012 OP
Fuddnik Apr 2012 #1
Tansy_Gold Apr 2012 #3
Fuddnik Apr 2012 #2
xchrom Apr 2012 #4
Tansy_Gold Apr 2012 #14
LineLineLineReply Watch out!
rfranklin Apr 2012 #20
xchrom Apr 2012 #29
tclambert Apr 2012 #48
TalkingDog Apr 2012 #40
xchrom Apr 2012 #41
Tansy_Gold Apr 2012 #43
xchrom Apr 2012 #44
Demeter Apr 2012 #5
Fuddnik Apr 2012 #7
Demeter Apr 2012 #9
girl gone mad Apr 2012 #10
Demeter Apr 2012 #13
xchrom Apr 2012 #16
Demeter Apr 2012 #23
xchrom Apr 2012 #25
Demeter Apr 2012 #26
xchrom Apr 2012 #28
AnneD Apr 2012 #30
hamerfan Apr 2012 #45
girl gone mad Apr 2012 #6
Demeter Apr 2012 #8
Demeter Apr 2012 #11
Po_d Mainiac Apr 2012 #17
Warpy Apr 2012 #47
Tansy_Gold Apr 2012 #12
Demeter Apr 2012 #15
xchrom Apr 2012 #18
xchrom Apr 2012 #19
Demeter Apr 2012 #21
AnneD Apr 2012 #33
raouldukelives Apr 2012 #39
Po_d Mainiac Apr 2012 #22
Demeter Apr 2012 #24
AnneD Apr 2012 #34
DemReadingDU Apr 2012 #36
Po_d Mainiac Apr 2012 #37
AnneD Apr 2012 #38
xchrom Apr 2012 #27
xchrom Apr 2012 #31
xchrom Apr 2012 #32
xchrom Apr 2012 #35
girl gone mad Apr 2012 #42
DemReadingDU Apr 2012 #46
Please login to view edit histories.