HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Topics » Economy & Education » Economy (Group) » STOCK MARKET WATCH -- Mon... » Reply #3
Introducing Discussionist: A new forum by the creators of DU

Response to Tansy_Gold (Original post)

Sun Mar 16, 2014, 08:55 PM

3. How Finance Gutted Manufacturing

http://www.bostonreview.net/forum/suzanne-berger-how-finance-gutted-manufacturing

In May 2013 shareholders voted to break up the Timken Company—a $5 billion Ohio manufacturer of tapered bearings, power transmissions, gears, and specialty steel—into two separate businesses. Their goal was to raise stock prices. The company, which makes complex and difficult products that cannot be easily outsourced, employs 20,000 people in the United States, China, and Romania. Ward “Tim” Timken, Jr., the Timken chairman whose family founded the business more than a hundred years ago, and James Griffith, Timken’s CEO, opposed the move.

The shareholders who supported the breakup hardly looked like the “barbarians at the gate” who forced the 1988 leveraged buyout of RJR Nabisco. This time the attack came from the California State Teachers Retirement System pension fund, the second-largest public pension fund in the United States, together with Relational Investors LLC, an asset management firm. And Tim Timken was not, like the RJR Nabisco CEO, eagerly pursuing the breakup to raise his own take. But beneath these differences are the same financial pressures that have shaped corporate structure for thirty years.

Urging Timken shareholders to vote for the split, Relational Investors argued that they should want “pure-play” companies, focused on a single industrial activity. Investors would then be free to balance their portfolios by selecting businesses in industrial sectors with varying degrees of risk and sensitivity to different phases of economic cycles. A firm such as Timken—about one-third a steel company (a materials play) and about two-thirds a bearings and power transmission business (an industrial components play)—would lock investors into a mix that, Relational Investors claimed, leads to a discount on share price.

Timken management argued that making both materials and products enabled them to bring to market higher-quality goods that met customers’ needs: for example, their ultra-large bearings for windmill towers, which measure two meters in diameter, weigh four tons, and have to stand up to extreme wind and temperature conditions. Controlling the entire value chain, they said, allowed them to fine-tune the attributes of the steel in order to make superior products. Nonetheless, the financial calculation about how to maximize quarterly returns won out....


Since the 1980s, financial market pressures have driven companies to hive off activities that sustained manufacturing.

Reply to this post

Back to OP Alert abuse Link to post in-thread

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 34 replies Author Time Post
Tansy_Gold Mar 2014 OP
Demeter Mar 2014 #1
jtuck004 Mar 2014 #9
Demeter Mar 2014 #28
Demeter Mar 2014 #2
tclambert Mar 2014 #32
LineReply How Finance Gutted Manufacturing
Demeter Mar 2014 #3
jtuck004 Mar 2014 #10
Demeter Mar 2014 #4
Demeter Mar 2014 #5
Ghost Dog Mar 2014 #12
Demeter Mar 2014 #27
proverbialwisdom Mar 2014 #33
DemReadingDU Mar 2014 #34
Demeter Mar 2014 #6
Demeter Mar 2014 #7
Demeter Mar 2014 #8
Ghost Dog Mar 2014 #11
xchrom Mar 2014 #13
xchrom Mar 2014 #14
xchrom Mar 2014 #15
Demeter Mar 2014 #29
xchrom Mar 2014 #30
xchrom Mar 2014 #16
xchrom Mar 2014 #17
xchrom Mar 2014 #18
Demeter Mar 2014 #26
xchrom Mar 2014 #19
xchrom Mar 2014 #20
xchrom Mar 2014 #21
xchrom Mar 2014 #22
xchrom Mar 2014 #23
xchrom Mar 2014 #24
xchrom Mar 2014 #25
Demeter Mar 2014 #31
Please login to view edit histories.