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Response to marmar (Original post)

Fri Jun 15, 2012, 10:56 AM

2. Been sayin' this for years. It seems SO obvious. As one who worked for a Fortune 500 Corp in 1970s

I've often repeated my experience of working 'back in the time' when it was acceptable for companies to 'have a bad quarter' or two without the stock market reacting. People remained invested based on the company's history and outlook projections, etc.

It just seems like in the 1980's something radical changed and all of a sudden it became necessary that every quarter show an increase in revenue. Some of that started with corporate raiders that came in, took over, reduced staff and outsourced over time --collected their big pay and left --and some of it grew along with day traders.

But the basic assumption that any company can have perpetual growth is a fairy tale so obvious as to make anyone with half a brain laugh out loud.

And yet it has persisted for decades.

It's also why big companies just kept on buying up smaller ones then cutting employees and expenses and then doing it over and over and over until we have all the monopolies again!



'I'm getting too old for this shit.'

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marmar Jun 2012 OP
immoderate Jun 2012 #1
LineNew Reply Been sayin' this for years. It seems SO obvious. As one who worked for a Fortune 500 Corp in 1970s
cyberpj Jun 2012 #2
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