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Fri Mar 7, 2014, 11:38 AM

Analysis: Why Russia's Crimea move fails legal test [View all]

Analysis: Why Russia's Crimea move fails legal test

The Russian parliament says Crimea can become Russian territory if that is what the region's people decide they want in a referendum set for 16 March.

Here Marc Weller, Professor of International Law at the University of Cambridge, examines the legal issues raised by Russia's intervention in Crimea. The territory became part of Soviet Ukraine in 1954 and remained Ukrainian after the Soviet collapse in 1991.


Russia has clearly and unambiguously recognised Ukraine and its present borders. This was confirmed in:

  • The Alma Ata Declaration of December 1991, which consigned the Soviet Union to history,

  • The Budapest memorandum of 1994, offering security guarantees to Ukraine in exchange for removing nuclear weapons from its territory

  • The 1997 agreement on the stationing of the Black Sea fleet in Crimean ports.
The 1997 agreement, extended for an additional 25 years in 2010, authorises the presence of Russian ships in Crimean harbours, along with the presence of a large military infrastructure, including training grounds, artillery ranges and other installations. However, major movements of Russian forces require consultation with the Ukrainian authorities and the agreed force levels cannot be increased unilaterally.

Contrary to these obligations, Russia has augmented its forces in Crimea without the consent the Ukraine. It has deployed them outside of the agreed bases, taking control over key installations, such as airports, and encircling Ukrainian units.

Russia's actions have created space for the pro-Russian local authorities in Crimea to displace the lawful public authorities of Ukraine. Legally, this clearly amounts to a significant act of intervention - indeed, as Russian military units are involved, it is a case of armed intervention.

- more -

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-26481423



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Reply Analysis: Why Russia's Crimea move fails legal test [View all]
ProSense Mar 2014 OP
warrior1 Mar 2014 #1
newthinking Mar 2014 #2
The Magistrate Mar 2014 #4
newthinking Mar 2014 #14
The Magistrate Mar 2014 #21
ProSense Mar 2014 #38
Jenoch Mar 2014 #47
geek tragedy Mar 2014 #5
newthinking Mar 2014 #10
Alex_ Mar 2014 #11
newthinking Mar 2014 #15
Alex_ Mar 2014 #25
newthinking Mar 2014 #45
muriel_volestrangler Mar 2014 #26
newthinking Mar 2014 #46
Alex_ Mar 2014 #6
pampango Mar 2014 #31
newthinking Mar 2014 #44
The Magistrate Mar 2014 #3
SidDithers Mar 2014 #7
newthinking Mar 2014 #17
pampango Mar 2014 #8
Demo_Chris Mar 2014 #9
geek tragedy Mar 2014 #12
Demo_Chris Mar 2014 #18
geek tragedy Mar 2014 #19
Demo_Chris Mar 2014 #23
geek tragedy Mar 2014 #28
Demo_Chris Mar 2014 #30
geek tragedy Mar 2014 #32
pampango Mar 2014 #34
stevenleser Mar 2014 #35
ProSense Mar 2014 #13
pampango Mar 2014 #16
newthinking Mar 2014 #20
Demo_Chris Mar 2014 #22
ProSense Mar 2014 #29
Demo_Chris Mar 2014 #33
ProSense Mar 2014 #36
Demo_Chris Mar 2014 #39
ProSense Mar 2014 #40
Demo_Chris Mar 2014 #42
ProSense Mar 2014 #43
okaawhatever Mar 2014 #24
amandabeech Mar 2014 #41
Cha Mar 2014 #48
Donald Ian Rankin Mar 2014 #50
muriel_volestrangler Mar 2014 #27
stevenleser Mar 2014 #37
ProSense Mar 2014 #49
Cha Mar 2014 #51
ProSense Mar 2014 #52