HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » Latest Breaking News (Forum) » Syrian president to give ...

Sat Jan 5, 2013, 04:30 PM

 

Syrian president to give speech Sunday

Source: AP



BEIRUT — Syrian President Bashar Assad will deliver a speech on Sunday in a rare address to the nation, state media said, as rebels fighting to topple his embattled regime pressed ahead with an offensive on the capital.

The official SANA news agency said in a brief statement Saturday that Assad will speak about the latest developments in Syria. The speech would be the first by the leader since June, and comes amid intense fighting between government troops and rebels on the outskirts of Damascus.

Assad has rarely spoken in public since the uprising against him began in March 2011. In each of his previous speeches and interviews, the president has dug in his heels even as Western powers have moved to boost the opposition in Syria's civil war.

In his last public comments, Assad vowed in an interview with Russia Today on Nov. 8 that he would "live and die in Syria."

Fighting has raged for weeks in the neighborhoods and towns around Damascus that have been opposition strongholds since the Syrian revolt began. The uprising started with peaceful protests but morphed into a civil war that has killed more than 60,000 people, according to a recent United Nations recent estimate.

Read more: http://www.chron.com/news/world/article/Syrian-president-to-give-speech-Sunday-4169430.php

7 replies, 1522 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread

Response to UnrepentantLiberal (Original post)

Sat Jan 5, 2013, 04:32 PM

1. I wish he'd start out by saying "I've rethought that Live and Die in Syria thing..."

I don't think I'll get my wish.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to UnrepentantLiberal (Original post)

Sat Jan 5, 2013, 04:46 PM

2. It seems as one of his last friends have been asking him to leave.

There are not many roads left for him to travel.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to UnrepentantLiberal (Original post)

Sat Jan 5, 2013, 04:47 PM

3. There is movement toward a resolution. As to whether it includes Assad, personally, I doubt it.

The bigger problem is what is to be done about the opposition? It's going to be Hell itself to just sort out al-Qaeda from the plain, old crazed Jihadists and Salafists who want to finish their war by exterminating the Alawite, while somehow assisting the armed Sunni militias who might not have genocide as their #1 objective. What about the Kurds, but the Turks won't like that, at all. I can see internicide fighting for many, many long years to come, and lots and lots of blowback for teh suckers who got sucked into this. For that, we can single out Hillary Clinton and David Petraeus and the rest of the neocon/humanitarian regime change crew in DC for special commendation.

Good fracking luck, especially since the AQ and Jihadi sponsors in Saudi Arabia and the Gulf States pretty much do whatever the frack they please and have never feared any accountability for their own secret war on the west, even after 9/11, and by the day get wealthier and more untouchable while we, well we're not getting anything except handed the three trillion Dollar bill for our part in all this mayhem and destruction across the region during the past decade.

Bashar al-Assad may have the least of the problems.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to leveymg (Reply #3)

Sun Jan 6, 2013, 01:37 AM

4. The Alawites will dominate the state, or they will be destroyed.

And I would think that progressive Syrians would favor the former. Anti-Alawi sentiment is akin to anti-Semitism, both in form and content.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to leveymg (Reply #3)

Sun Jan 6, 2013, 05:25 AM

6. Yeah, he has a cash out option.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to UnrepentantLiberal (Original post)

Sun Jan 6, 2013, 01:41 AM

5. If the content of the speech is "peace talks" rather than anti-terrorism, he's doomed for sure.

He's doomed in either case probably, but if he talks about "peace talks" with insurgent groups that have pledged never to speak with the existing Syrian government, then he's only inviting the killing of him, all his relatives, and co-religionists.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to David__77 (Reply #5)

Sun Jan 6, 2013, 08:41 AM

7. The US and France opened the door to the Sunni uprising, and the question is can we close it

or even want to control the inevitable push toward genocidal ethnic cleansing of the Alawite that will follow the collapse of the Syrian State and Army?

One of the things that has been deeply troubling about Hillary Clinton and Susan Rice's brand of humanitarian intervention is the claim that it's based in the lessons learned in Rwanda, and how the Clinton Administration did little while the Hutu carried out a campaign of genocide extermination against a million minority Tutsi who had previously run the government during and after the French colonial era. This is the same pattern of minority group colonial administration that was established by the French and the British across their empires, including Syria, and it has led to bitter ethnic and religious clashes.

Another frightening Syrian parallel with Rwanda is the incident that sparked the genocide. In 1994, as the Hutu leader was returning from a trip to neighboring Burundi, a SAM-7 missile destroyed his aircraft. MANPADs looted for Libyan arms depots after the overthrow of Ghadaffi are now abundant in Syria. From the Rwanda Genocide Wiki:

On April 6, 1994, the airplane carrying Rwandan President Juvénal Habyarimana and Cyprien Ntaryamira, the Hutu president of Burundi, was shot down as it prepared to land in Kigali, killing everyone on board. Responsibility for the attack was disputed, with both the RPF and Hutu extremists being blamed. A later investigation by the Rwandan government blamed Hutu extremists in the Rwandan army. In January 2012, a French investigation confirmed that the missile fire which brought down the Rwandan president’s plane came from a military camp and not Tutsi rebels. In spite of disagreements about the identities of its perpetrators, many observers believe the attack and deaths of the two Hutu presidents served as the catalyst for the genocide.


If Rice were truly impacted by the events in Rwanda when she served as the Undersecretary for African Affairs in the State Department, she and Secretary Clinton should have been aware of these terrible parallels as they pushed the strategy or regime change across MENA. The really frightening thing is that she and the other humanitarian interventionists may well be cognizant of these lessons how genocides occur, but enthusiastically followed a parallel road, nonetheless.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread