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Fri Apr 19, 2013, 08:57 PM

 

A round of applause for the person who put their scanner online and Ustream for not censoring it.

http://www.ustream.tv/channel/ma-rt-9-window-cam

19 replies, 1286 views

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Reply A round of applause for the person who put their scanner online and Ustream for not censoring it. (Original post)
Paul E Ester Apr 2013 OP
Marrah_G Apr 2013 #1
Narraback Apr 2013 #2
nolabear Apr 2013 #3
gateley Apr 2013 #4
Anansi1171 Apr 2013 #5
marions ghost Apr 2013 #6
City Lights Apr 2013 #7
tarheelsunc Apr 2013 #8
Triana Apr 2013 #9
BumRushDaShow Apr 2013 #10
LiberalElite Apr 2013 #11
BumRushDaShow Apr 2013 #12
Montezumasdaddy Apr 2013 #13
riderinthestorm Apr 2013 #14
cliffordu Apr 2013 #15
Paul E Ester Apr 2013 #16
NightWatcher Apr 2013 #17
Paul E Ester Apr 2013 #18
Paul E Ester Apr 2013 #19

Response to Paul E Ester (Original post)

Fri Apr 19, 2013, 08:57 PM

1. Abso-fucking-lutely

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Response to Paul E Ester (Original post)

Fri Apr 19, 2013, 08:58 PM

2. I Second that! You rock!

nt

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Response to Paul E Ester (Original post)

Fri Apr 19, 2013, 08:59 PM

3. Amen. Hearing reality and not rumor is wonderful.

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Response to Paul E Ester (Original post)

Fri Apr 19, 2013, 08:59 PM

4. I just posted a shoutout to flamingdem -- please give it a K&R! Wasn't that something??

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Response to Paul E Ester (Original post)

Fri Apr 19, 2013, 08:59 PM

5. Amazing! Indeed. A game changer!! NT

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Response to Paul E Ester (Original post)

Fri Apr 19, 2013, 09:00 PM

6. thanks!

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Response to Paul E Ester (Original post)

Fri Apr 19, 2013, 09:00 PM

7. Woot!

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Response to Paul E Ester (Original post)

Fri Apr 19, 2013, 09:02 PM

8. Transparency is awesome

This should be freely available online and provided the government. I definitely applaud the private citizen who made this public information publicly available. And Ustream not removing it is surprising, but that's very good of them not to.

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Response to Paul E Ester (Original post)

Fri Apr 19, 2013, 09:04 PM

9. Oh YEA. That's the one I'd been listening to!

MUCH MUCH appreciated!

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Response to Paul E Ester (Original post)

Fri Apr 19, 2013, 09:07 PM

10. YES!

There were something like 266,000+ streaming from what I recall during the peak...

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Response to Paul E Ester (Original post)

Fri Apr 19, 2013, 09:07 PM

11. YES!

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Response to Paul E Ester (Original post)

Fri Apr 19, 2013, 09:29 PM

12. Kickety kick! n/t

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Response to Paul E Ester (Original post)

Fri Apr 19, 2013, 09:43 PM

13. Thank you thank you!!!!

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Response to Paul E Ester (Original post)

Fri Apr 19, 2013, 09:44 PM

14. K&R!!



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Response to Paul E Ester (Original post)

Fri Apr 19, 2013, 09:44 PM

15. What you said. K&R!!

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Response to Paul E Ester (Original post)

Fri Apr 19, 2013, 09:45 PM

16. Boston manhunt complicated by Ustream, Twitter

 

During the final stages of the hunt for Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 19, on Friday, police had to also consider complications that come in the digital age.

By the time police were getting ready to make a move, at least 260,000 people were listening to the police scanner live. About 2.32 million viewers were listening in on Ustream.tv.

At about 8 p.m. ET, police could be heard saying on the scanner: "We also have a problem with your downlink. It's being broadcast on the Internet."

Earlier on in the day, the Federal Bureau of Investigations and Boston Police Department made a plea to the public to not broadcast any tactical positions that could compromise officers' safety on social media.


http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-205_162-57580551/boston-manhunt-complicated-by-ustream-twitter/

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Response to Paul E Ester (Original post)

Fri Apr 19, 2013, 09:45 PM

17. What a freakin genius. I love technology

That was the coolest thing in the world.

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Response to Paul E Ester (Original post)

Fri Apr 19, 2013, 09:47 PM

18. Boston Police Scanner Live-Tweeting Complicates Manhunt For Second Suspected Marathon Bomber

 

As Thursday night turned into Friday morning and seemingly all of Boston became a crime scene navigated by police in pursuit of the men responsible for the bombings at the marathon, some 150,000 people listened in to the chatter over police radios using Broadcastify, an online service that provides live streams of police scanners.

By Friday morning, the Boston Police Department was using social media to try to contain the threat stemming from too many ears on its radio communications: The department sent out a Tweet pleading with people to stop sharing tactical information gleaned from the scanner feeds.

"WARNING," the department declared. "Do Not Compromise Officer Safety by Broadcasting Tactical Positions of Homes Being Searched."

Broadcastify promptly complied by taking the feed off the air, but individuals continued to use social media to dispense updates culled from other police radio broadcasting services, complicating police operations and underscoring the modern challenges of police work in an age in which seemingly everyone is connected.


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/04/19/boston-police-scanner-live-tweeting-manhunt_n_3118253.html?utm_hp_ref=technology

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Response to Paul E Ester (Original post)

Fri Apr 19, 2013, 09:48 PM

19. SCANNER FEVER

 

Right now, on eBay, you can buy a police scanner for anywhere from thirty bucks (Uniden Bearcat, sixteen channels) to four hundred and fifty (a thousand channels, G.P.S. capabilities, etc.). Such devices have been on the market at least since the nineteen-thirties and grew in popularity in the seventies, a byproduct of ham radio. In a piece called “Action at Your Fingertips,” a 1977 issue of Popular Mechanics encouraged hobbyists to “peek into the worlds” of police and fire units, taxicab drivers, forest rangers, ship-to-shore conversations, weather forecasters, rescue workers and “newsmen calling in stories.”

Law enforcement and journalists often keep scanners in their homes, finding odd comfort (and a paycheck) in the ceaseless crackle and fuzz. A police scanner can create a personal connection between a listener and some distant drama: the voices are those of the actual men and women in the field, working a scene, their experiences unfolding in real time. To hear events as they happen, on one’s own terms, is to experience a news event in an entirely different kind of way. But things get tricky when the untrained listener decides to go public with what they overhear.

One of the more fascinating aspects of the manhunt for Boston Marathon bombing suspects Dzhokhar and Tamerlan Tsarnaev is the speed with which ordinary citizens on the Internet’s bleeding edge discovered the old, analog law-enforcement tool. In the early hours of the operation, a swelling audience of thousands Googled and link-shared its way to online live-streaming versions of the police scanner, and to the tense voices of officers and tactical units in Watertown referencing “long guns” and calling for robots and dogs and “retreat!” Snippets of presumed fact hemorrhaged their way into a rapt world in a-hundred-and-forty-character bursts, often via undiscriminating human tidbit dispensers.

The events provided the perfect (if that is the right word) circumstances for the scanner to emerge as an everyman device: a dramatic manhunt paired with legitimate public-safety concerns and an urgent need to understand what was happening. Insatiable, impatient voices appeared as the hunt intensified: “Stuff happening on the news is so slow,” one person tweeted. “Glad im listening to this scanner or else i would be about a half hour behind.” Listening gave danger-zone residents information they needed: stay inside, get down, don’t open the door; if you’re driving, take shelter, and don’t stop for anyone. Not everything heard over the scanners was so useful, though.


http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/newsdesk/2013/04/police-scanners-tsarnaev-manhunt.html

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