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BainsBane

Profile Information

Gender: Female
Hometown: Minnesota
Member since: Sat Sep 15, 2012, 01:49 PM
Number of posts: 28,715

Journal Archives

A Woman Disappeared

Forty years ago today, the United States succeeded in its conspiracy with International Telephone and Telegraph to overthrow the democratically elected government of Salvador Allende in Chile. Allende was a socialist committed to democracy. Henry Kissinger, the principal architect of the coup, considered Allende a far greater threat to US interests-- and corporate capitalism in particular--than Fidel Castro, precisely because Allende was democratic and could have set an example for socialist movements throughout Europe and Latin America.

Allende's overthrow and assassination was followed by two decades of brutal dictatorship under Augusto Pinochet, whose government rounded up, tortured, and disappeared tens of thousands of Chileans. The US was aware of the torture and killings in Chile. Kissinger, in fact, observed that a minor concern like human rights should not get in the way of a good relationship with a friendly government like Pinochet's. Among the disappeared were some prominent Chileans, like the poet and folk singer Victor Jarra, and some ordinary, like the woman commemorated in this song performed by the weavers, which I find myself singing all day.




For documentary evidence on the US involvement in the coup, see the National Security Archives.

http://www2.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/NSAEBB/NSAEBB8/nsaebb8i.htm
http://www2.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/NSAEBB/NSAEBB212/index.htm

2500 line up for Mobile Free Clinic for Health Care

Robert Ellis has walked 15 miles, through the night, to get here. But he isn't here for a summertime fair.
"I really need my teeth fixed. They are really bad. And my hearing," Ellis says. "I don't know which one's worse, my hearing or my teeth." . . .

Ellis joins some 2,500 other people who over the course of three days line up in the wee hours of the morning in the hopes of getting free medical care. Many want their teeth checked or even pulled, others need their eyes examined, but some, like Sheila Johnson, are also looking for specialized medical care. . . .

"Even though the care here is quality care, we don't need to be doing this in the world's richest country," Brock says. "I would rather be back in Haiti, in India and Africa, and where this organization began in the Amazon than doing it here in the world's richest country. But I don't see this ending anytime soon." . . .

Over the course of three days in Wise, RAM helped 1,200 dental patients, pulled 4,000 teeth, grinded lenses for 900 pairs of glasses and in total provided more than $2 million dollars worth of health care. All free of charge.

"It doesn't matter where you go in the United States you are going to find huge numbers of people that either dont have access to care because it's an underserved area or in most cases they can't afford to go to the dentist, they can't afford to go to the eye doctor," Brock said. "So they are going to be relying on the kinds of services we provide."


Full Story and video at http://abcnews.go.com/Health/mobile-free-clinic-brings-health-care-uss-underserved/story?id=20016498

Minimizing Rape, from The Southern Poverty Law Center

Misogynists in the men’s and fathers’ rights movements have developed a set of claims about women to support their depictions of them as violent liars and manipulators of men. Some suggest that women attack men, even sexually, just as much as men attack women. Others claim that vast numbers of reported rapes of women, as much as half or even more, are fabrications designed to destroy men they don’t like or to gain the upper hand in contested custody cases. What follows is a brief look at some of these claims and what the best science really shows.

THE CLAIM Men’s rights activists often insist that men are victimized by sex crimes and abuse just as much as women are, if not more. This assertion is meant to support their contention that the courts and laws outrageously favor women.

THE REALITY A major 2010 study by the Centers for Disease Control’s National Center for Injury Prevention and Control thoroughly debunks such claims. Nearly one in five American women (18.3%), the study found, have been raped; the comparable number for men is one in 71 (1.4%). Not only that, but more than half (51.1%) of female victims reported that their rapist was an intimate partner — a current or former spouse or boyfriend, or a date. According to a 2000 study by the Department of Justice, female rape victims were also about twice as likely as male rape victims to be injured during an assault (31.5% versus 16.5%), even though many women do not physically resist their attackers for fear of injury. Overall, the studies found, most violence of all kinds against women (64%) came from current or former intimate partners, while that is true for only about one-sixth (16.2%) of men. Women were also far more likely to be stalked than men (16.2% versus 5.2%), and two-thirds of women’s stalkers (66.2%) were current or former intimate partners, compared to four in 10 for men (41.4%). A 2005 Department of Justice study also found that between 1998 and 2002, 84% of spousal abuse victims were female, as were 86% of victims of abuse at the hands of a dating partner. Males made up 83% of all spouse murderers and 75% of dating partner murderers.

THE CLAIM Close to half or even more of the sexual assaults reported by women never occurred. Versions of this claim are a mainstay of sites like Register-Her.com, which specializes in vilifying women who allegedly lie about being raped. Such claims are also sometimes made by men involved in court custody battles.

THE REALITY This claim, which has gained some credence in recent years, is largely based on a 1994 article in the Archives of Sexual Behavior by Eugene Kanin that found that 41% of rape allegations in his study were “false.” But Kanin’s methodology has been widely criticized, and his results do not accord with most other findings. Kanin researched only one unnamed Midwestern town, and he did not spell out the criteria police used to decide an allegation was false. The town also polygraphed or threatened to polygraph all alleged victims, a now-discredited practice that is known to cause many women to drop their complaint even when it is true. In fact, most studies that suggest high rates of false accusations make a key mistake — equating reports described by police as “unfounded” with those that are false. The truth is that unfounded reports very often include those for which no corroborating evidence could be found or where the victim was deemed an unreliable witness (often because of drug or alcohol use or because of prior sexual contact with the attacker). They also include those cases where women recant their accusations, often because of a fear of reprisal, a distrust of the legal system or embarrassment because drugs or alcohol were involved. The best studies, where the rape allegations have been studied in detail, suggest a rate of false reports of somewhere between 2% and 10%. The most comprehensive study, conducted by the British Home Office in 2005, found a rate of 2.5% for false accusations of rape. The best U.S. investigation, the 2008 “Making a Difference” study, found a 6.8% rate.


http://www.splcenter.org/get-informed/intelligence-report/browse-all-issues/2012/spring/myths-of-the-manosphere-lying-about-women

I have a variety

An abstract painting my father did, as well as some of his photographs, some Pre-Raphaelite prints, some Impressionist prints, various other things I've picked up along the way.


Here are a couple


This goes above my bed


A print of a Monet vase of flowers I can't find an image of right now.

I also have a Moroccan wrought iron mirror frame on the wall, with no mirror in it.

You definitely did not pick the most common ones

because certain ones constantly come up and they aren't here. Ghent and some golden Byzantine ones.



From the Altarpiece, aka, (Adoration of the Mystic Lamb) at Ghent (1432) by Jan van Eyck (1390-1441)




Duccio di Buoninsegna, Virgin and Child Enthroned with Saints, central panel of Maesta altarpiece, Siena cathedral, Siena, 1308-1311

This is my favorite


Simone Martini and Lippo Memmi, Annunciation 1333

First stipulation is that it comes with a house cleaner.

Sorry, I can't limit myself to one picture.

I'd like a cottage-style house with a beautiful garden.



a sunroom



A spacious, light airy kitchen that leads to an herb garden



Cozy spots to curl up with a book.




amazing closet space



a clawfoot tub


Did I mention I want a house cleaner?

Yours looks pretty fantastic, Applegrove

I would also like a house, a cottage. Here are some pictures.















Now can someone tell me why browsing cottage decor would open up an ad on how to "pick up chicks" . . .?????

Here Are All Of The Nations That Incarcerate More Of Their Population Than The U.S.

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None


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/13/incarceration-rate-per-capita_n_3745291.html?ncid=edlinkusaolp00000009

That's the issue if you are determined to deny racism

Denying racism is essential to maintaining white privilege. You may not understand my point, but I understand you perfectly.

I love handbags

I have a beautiful handbag I bought for myself for a milestone birthday nearly two years ago. Here it is.




It's a Brahmin bag, not close to Oprah's price range, but then I don't have Oprah's money. Being me and liking a bargain, I used a coupon during Macy's Friends and Family sale.


I don't give a shit about cutting-edge electronics or fancy cars, but I love a nice handbag. So does Oprah. Our sense of what a nice bag is varies greatly in accordance with our incomes.

Know what else? I would like another bag, and just might buy one sometime in the next year.
Maybe this one if I can swing it.



The money I spent on that bag or might spend in the future could be spent on feeding starving children in Africa. I don't feed starving children in Africa; Oprah does. I contribute a bit from each paycheck to the local food shelf, not nearly what Oprah contributes either in dollars, obviously, or I suspect in percentage of income.

We all spend money on stuff we absolutely don't have to. That money you may spend on beer and cigarettes or computer stuff could feed lots of starving people. Starving children across the world would love to have access to the food scraps so insignificant to you that they go in the garbage. They would consider your consumption every bit as disgusting as you consider Oprah's.

None of that changes the fact that Oprah is a black woman, and no matter how much money she has and what she can afford, she will always be black. Because of that, she is subject to being treated as inferior, like every other person with black and brown skin on this planet. Some have gone to great lengths to dismiss, explain away, and every justify racism. White privilege hinges on denying racism. Yeah, I know you don't feel more privileged that Oprah because it most ways you aren't, but you will never hear a story of a white celebrity being told she can't afford something. Nor will people on this site complain about Angelina Jolie's expensive clothes or Jay Leno's many, many cars. They are white, and no one questions their right to acquire stuff. Oprah, however, is another story.
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