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Name: herb morehead
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Hometown: marble falls, tx
Member since: Thu Feb 23, 2012, 03:49 AM
Number of posts: 7,958

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How Hillary Clinton's State Department Sold Fracking to the World

How Hillary Clinton's State Department Sold Fracking to the World
A trove of secret documents details the US government's global push for shale gas.

—By Mariah Blake
| September/October 2014 Issue


One icy morning in February 2012, Hillary Clinton's plane touched down in the Bulgarian capital, Sofia, which was just digging out from a fierce blizzard. Wrapped in a thick coat, the secretary of state descended the stairs to the snow-covered tarmac, where she and her aides piled into a motorcade bound for the presidential palace. That afternoon, they huddled with Bulgarian leaders, including Prime Minister Boyko Borissov, discussing everything from Syria's bloody civil war to their joint search for loose nukes. But the focus of the talks was fracking. The previous year, Bulgaria had signed a five-year, $68 million deal, granting US oil giant Chevron millions of acres in shale gas concessions. Bulgarians were outraged. Shortly before Clinton arrived, tens of thousands of protesters poured into the streets carrying placards that read "Stop fracking with our water" and "Chevron go home." Bulgaria's parliament responded by voting overwhelmingly for a fracking moratorium.

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Clinton urged Bulgarian officials to give fracking another chance. According to Borissov, she agreed to help fly in the "best specialists on these new technologies to present the benefits to the Bulgarian people." But resistance only grew. The following month in neighboring Romania, thousands of people gathered to protest another Chevron fracking project, and Romania's parliament began weighing its own shale gas moratorium. Again Clinton intervened, dispatching her special envoy for energy in Eurasia, Richard Morningstar, to push back against the fracking bans. The State Depart­ment's lobbying effort culminated in late May 2012, when Morningstar held a series of meetings on fracking with top Bulgarian and Romanian officials. He also touted the technology in an interview on Bulgarian national radio, saying it could lead to a fivefold drop in the price of natural gas. A few weeks later, Romania's parliament voted down its proposed fracking ban and Bulgaria's eased its moratorium.

The episode sheds light on a crucial but little-known dimension of Clinton's diplomatic legacy. Under her leadership, the State Department worked closely with energy companies to spread fracking around the globe—part of a broader push to fight climate change, boost global energy supply, and undercut the power of adversaries such as Russia that use their energy resources as a cudgel. But environmental groups fear that exporting fracking, which has been linked to drinking-water contamination and earthquakes at home, could wreak havoc in countries with scant environmental regulation. And according to interviews, diplomatic cables, and other documents obtained by Mother Jones, American officials—some with deep ties to industry—also helped US firms clinch potentially lucrative shale concessions overseas, raising troubling questions about whose interests the program actually serves.


Long article well worth the read.

Some steps to cleaning up police problems:

1. Police must live in the towns and cities they patrol. If they aren't patrolling their home communities aren't they really patrolling as an outside occupying force, almost as mercinaries?

2. Return all military hardware to the military: no modified tanks, armored personnel carriers, grenade launchers, assault rifles etc.

3. Demilitarize all uniforms. No military type medals, no parachute pants, no military helmets, no combat boots or jumper boots etc.

4. As bad as it sounds: no recruitment of ex-military straight out of service without a several year cooling down period unless the candidate has at least a MP/SP background.

5. Tamper proof cameras with audio on all police and police vehicles.

6. Establishment of an outside board to review all police shootings and all police complaints. The police cannot police themselves without oversight.

7. Establishment real police academies with state guidelines outside the control of local police forces.

Here's What Happened When A Neighborhood Decided To Ban Cars For A Month

Here's What Happened When A Neighborhood Decided To Ban Cars For A Month
Viewers to Volunteers
14 May 2015


Two years ago, an average neighborhood in the South Korean city of Suwon embarked on a radical experiment: For one month, the neighborhood suddenly got rid of every car.

Called the Ecomobility Festival, it was created as a way to help the city move much more quickly to a low-carbon future by helping citizens get a visceral sense of how that future could look.

"Usually in planning you do a computer simulation—an artificial picture of the future, and maybe a PowerPoint presentation," says Konrad Otto-Zimmermann, creative director at The Urban Idea, who helped mastermind the festival. "We're doing it in a different way: in a real city, with real people, in real time. It's like a piece of theater where the neighborhood is a stage."

When planning began, the neighborhood was filled with cars, and people typically drove everywhere, even pulling up on sidewalks to park in front of shops while they ran errands. "Most of the people could not envision how their neighborhood would be car-free," Otto-Zimmerman says. "They simply said it couldn't work."

The planning process took nearly two years and countless meetings to get support from skeptics. Finally, in September of 2013, 1,500 cars were moved out of the neighborhood to parking lots elsewhere in the city. The city handed out 400 temporary bikes and electric scooters to neighbors, and set up a bike school to teach the many residents who didn't know how to ride. Mail was delivered by electric vehicles. Shuttle buses ran every 15 minutes to take people to their cars.

The neighborhood transformed. Cafes and restaurants added new sidewalk seating, and the streets filled with people. It often looked a lot like car-free streets look during "Sunday Streets" events in other places, but the length of the experiment helped show how people could actually live without cars in everyday life.

"They live it for a month so their daily routines have to adapt," says Otto-Zimmerman. "If you only have a car-free weekend, many cities do that, this is not exciting anymore. If it's only a week, people can still reschedule their way to the dentist or whatever they have that week to work around it. It has to be a month in order to hit people's daily agenda, so they really experience ecomobility in their daily life."

Though the planners originally considered the idea of switching everything back to normal after the month-long experiment—and then letting citizens push for lasting changes—the city's mayor decided to add some permanent improvements before the festival, like widening sidewalks on major streets and adding new pocket parks.

"The mayor felt that, if after all this effort, and people changing their lives for a month, there would be nothing remaining, people would think the city doesn't take it seriously," Otto-Zimmerman says. "He felt that in order to be credible, he wanted people to see it was the start of a real improvement."

After the festival ended, the city also gathered residents for a huge meeting to ask for ideas for more permanent changes. The biggest result: The speed limit was cut nearly in half, to about 18 miles per hour. That meant that commuters no longer wanted to use the neighborhood as a shortcut, and traffic started to disappear. Neighbors also decided to eliminate side parking on some major streets—and parking on sidewalks—which helped encourage people to start walking and biking to run errands. Every month, the community also hosts a car-free day.

This fall, Otto-Zimmerman will repeat the experiment in Johannesburg, South Africa, and another city will follow. "It takes an open-minded mayor who likes innovation and provocation, and has a greener vision of a city," he says. "And someone who has enough influence and supporters to go through the exercise, because it's in principle controversial."

It's also expensive: The project in Suwon cost over $10 million dollars to produce, though much of that budget went to renovating streets that were already in need of repair. Still, it's not necessarily a simple experiment to produce.

The South Korean experiment was documented in a new book calledNeighborhood in Motion: One Month, One Neighborhood, No Cars.

This article was written by Adele Peters from Co. Exist and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

TransAsia crash pilot last words: 'Wow, pulled the wrong throttle'

TransAsia crash pilot last words: 'Wow, pulled the wrong throttle'

Caroline Mortimer, The Independent

20 hours ago

Captain Liao accidentally turned off the only working engine while trying to fix the other one which had "flamed out"

A recording taken from the cockpit of crashed TransAsia flight GE235 has revealed the pilot accidentally switched off the plane’s sole working engine – a blunder that resulted in the deaths of 43 people in Taiwan.

According to a report by the country’s Aviation Safety Council, Captain Liao Jian-zong was heard to say "Wow, pulled back the wrong side throttle" but did not realise his mistake until it was too late.

Dramatic footage from a nearby motorway in Taipei showed the plane flipping over, narrowly missing nearby buildings and clipping the motorway and a taxi as it crashed into the Keelung River just minutes after taking off from Taipei Songshan Airport.

There appeared to be some confusion as Liao and his co-pilot desperately tried to restart the other engine after it appeared to lose power three minutes into the flight.

Relatives of the victims pray during a Buddhist ritual near the wreckage of TransAsia Airways plane Flight GE235 after it crash landed into a river, in New Taipei City, February 5, 2015.

It has also been revealed that Liao, who was killed instantly on impact, had failed simulator training in May the previous year because he did not know how to deal with an engine flame out on take off. Despite this he passed the test a second time in June and was promoted to captain in August 2014.

Instructors commented at the time that he was "prone to be nervous and may make oral errors during the engine start procedure", displayed a "lack of confidence" and was "nervous", the report shows. In pictures: TransAsia crash

One survivor told a local TV station, ETTTV, that the engine did not feel right from take off.

Huang Jin-sun said: “There was some sound next to me. It did not feel right shortly after take-off. The engine did not feel right.”

The council's initial report did not assign blame to any party. A draft of the final report is due to be released in November.

Additional reporting by Reuters


Adopted Woman Raised as Black Finds Out at Age 70 That Her Birth Parents Were White

Adopted Woman Raised as Black Finds Out at Age 70 That Her Birth Parents Were White
Jun 24, 2015, 3:43 PM ET


PHOTO: Verda Byrd was adopted and raised as a fair-skinned African-American, but later discovered that her birth parents were white.
70-Year-Old Black Woman Discovers She's White
Next Video Rachel Dolezal Addresses Scandal After Resigning NAACP Post
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Verda Byrd spent the past seven decades of her life as a black woman, but at age 70, she discovered a shocking family secret her parents took to their grave that she's recently made peace with -- she was born white.

Byrd, now 72, was adopted as a baby in 1943 by her black parents, who never told her that her biological parents were actually white, she said, explaining that she only uncovered the truth in 2013 about her birth after she went on a search for her biological parents' history.

"It was overwhelming," she told ABC News today. "You cannot erase 70 years of your life and just accept what the papers say instantly. It's like 70 years pass by, and in a blink of an eye, you’re a different race."

And though her story may sound similar to that of Rachel Dolezal, the former NAACP leader whose parents accused her of pretending to be black, Byrd said she wants to make it clear she and Dolezal actually very different.

"She upsets me so much because I don’t understand why she or anyone needs to lie about their race or their ethnic group," said Byrd, of Converse, Texas. "I did not know I was born white. She knew it."

Byrd's story is a complicated one, and it starts in Kansas City, Missouri, on Sept. 27, 1942, when she was born Jeanette Beagle to her white parents, Daisy Beagle and Earl Beagle, she learned from her adoption documents.

"Daisy and Earl were legally married, but Earl would go away and come back and go away in come back," she said. "In 1943, during a time he left Daisy, she had an accident. She fell 30 feet from a Kansas City trolley and wasn't able to care for her then five children. She was in the hospital for a year, and all of her children were placed in a children's home."

Though Daisy Beagle eventually took four of her children back, she left behind Byrd, who was the youngest and still a baby, and Byrd said she suspects it was because her birth mother realized she wouldn't be able to take care of her.

Byrd was legally adopted by a black couple, Ray Wagner and Edwinna Wagner, who couldn't have children of their own, Byrd said, adding that her name was changed to "Verda Ann Wagner." She later married and changed her last name to Byrd.

Strangers would assume Byrd took after her light-skinned mother, Byrd said, and because she had curly hair that could be styled similarly to black women's hair, no one in Newton, Kansas, where she grew up, questioned her about her race, she said.

"I went to a white school because our town was small and our schools weren't segregated," she said. "And other than my dad getting paid less than his white counterparts, my family didn't experience much discrimination because my mom and I were lighter-skinned and there weren't a lot of African Americans in Newton."

The dynamics in Newton however, were much different than that of nearby segregated metropolis Topeka, where Byrd and her family sometimes attended church, she said.

"I was friends with Linda Brown, who was the daughter of the pastor of the AME church I went to youth group conferences with," Byrd said. Brown was involved in the landmark Supreme Court case Brown vs. Board of Education of Topeka, which ruled school segregation unconstitutional.

Byrd said she "lived the black experience" even more so at 21 when she moved to a black community where her aunt and uncle lived in St. Paul, Minnesota, to start work.

"I then began to have black boyfriends, go to black churches and go to black social clubs," she said. "In church classes, I studied the marches and studied our black history, that kind of stuff. I knew who Martin Luther King was and what he stood for. I knew about Emmett Till, Malcolm X, the KKK, that kind of stuff. This was the era I lived and grew up in."

Byrd eventually married a black man, who served in the Air Force, and she traveled often with him depending on where he was deployed, she said, adding that they've now been married for over 36 years and have one daughter together.

"Even when my mom died 30 years ago and I first discovered the adoption document with my birth name, we were traveling to Paris, Tokyo, Germany, all these places, so I didn't really think about my birth or adoption or race," she said.

Byrd came across the documents again in 2013, after the couple retired in Converse, Texas, a suburb outside of San Antonio.

"At that time, I thought, now I have the peace of mind to find out who this Jeanette Beagle really is," Byrd said, explaining that she hired a researcher to help her trace her biological history and adoption records.

"I had to read them over and over and over again for two to three days," she said, explaining that the experience was overwhelming and that she found out she actually had 10 biological siblings, only four of whom are still alive.

But today, two years after the revelation, she's come to terms with her experience and identity, Byrd said, adding she recently reunited with some of her biological siblings.

"I've accepted my life, because as a trans-racial adoptee, it is what it is," she said. "I am still comfortable as Verda Ann Wagner Byrd. When I die, and when I'm six feet under, my tombstone is not going to have the word 'race' on it. I'm lucky to have two moms and dads."

As for what race she currently identifies as, Byrd said she believes she is "a beautiful black woman" and that she recently checked white, black and other on paperwork at a military hospital facility in San Antonio.

"If they need clarification, I can give it to them," she said. "I was born white, but my whole life, I've lived the black experience."

Tearing down every Dixie rag down won't end racism.....

and we shouldn't allow the right congratulate themselves into thinking they'll shut the conversation down by getting on the bandwagon 150 years late.

This just a beginning.

No charges after fatal shooting at NSA

Source: Houston Chronicle

No charges after fatal shooting at NSA
| June 24, 2015 | Updated: June 24, 2015 6:47am

FORT MEADE, Md. (AP) — Federal and local authorities say no charges will be filed after an investigation of a fatal shooting by National Security Agency police at Fort Meade in Maryland.

The U.S. Attorney's Office and Howard County police said Tuesday that they've completed investigations into the March 30 incident at a security gate outside the agency off the Baltimore-Washington Parkway.

Authorities said 27-year-old Ricky Hall, who went by Mya, was killed and a passenger was wounded when police opened fire after the pair ignored orders to turn around a stolen SUV.

U.S. Attorney Rod Rosenstein says video shows Hall ignoring officers' commands and "racing toward the officer who fired at the vehicle." He says officers committed no crimes and there's no basis for federal charges against the passenger. County police say they won't bring charges.

Read more: http://www.chron.com/news/crime/article/No-charges-after-fatal-shooting-at-NSA-6346017.php

I just recieved this nasty mail, please help:


20 Big Ideas From Bernie Sanders to Reverse Inequality, Expand Safety Nets and Stop America's Plutoc

20 Big Ideas From Bernie Sanders to Reverse Inequality, Expand Safety Nets and Stop America's Plutocrats
Sanders outlines his platform in a major hometown speech.
By Steven Rosenfeld / AlterNet
May 27, 2015

On Tuesday, Vermont Independent Sen. Bernard Sanders gave a major speech in Burlington, Vemont, where his political career began three decades ago when he was elected mayor of his state’s largest city. Sanders, who is seeking the 2016 Democratic nomination for president, described 20 ideas that will be the hallmarks of his campaign.

1. Time for big thinking and new ideas: “Brothers and sisters: Now is not the time for thinking small. Now is not the time for the same-old-same-old establishment politics and stale inside-the-beltway ideas. <snip>

2. America’s problems are worse than ever: “This country faces more serious problems today than at any time since the Great Depression....

....... Here is my promise to you for this campaign. Not only will I fight to protect the working families of this country, but we’re going to build a movement of millions of Americans who are prepared to stand up and fight back.”

3. Economic inequality is the top issue: “In America we now have more income and wealth inequality than any other major country on earth, and the gap between the very rich and everyone is wider than at any time since the 1920s. The issue of wealth and income inequality is the great moral issue of our time, it is the great economic issue of our time and it is the great political issue of our time. And we will address it.”

4. The middle class is being destroyed: “It is the tragic reality that for the last 40 years the great middle class of our country—once the envy of the world—has been disappearing. Despite exploding technology and increased worker productivity, median family income is almost $5,000 less than it was in 1999. In Vermont and throughout this country it is not uncommon for people to be working two or three jobs just to cobble together enough income to survive on and some healthcare benefits.”

5. Poverty is worse than is acknowledged:
Today, shamefully, we have 45 million people living in poverty, many of whom are working at low-wage jobs. These are the people who struggle every day to find the money to feed their kids, to pay their electric bills and to put gas in the car to get to work. This campaign is about those people and our struggling middle class.”

6. The country needs a real jobs program: “If we are truly serious about reversing the decline of the middle class we need a major federal jobs program which puts millions of Americans back to work at decent paying jobs. At a time when our roads, bridges, water systems, rail and airports are decaying, the most effective way to rapidly create meaningful jobs is to rebuild our crumbling infrastructure. That’s why I’ve introduced legislation which would invest $1 trillion over 5 years to modernize our country’s physical infrastructure. This legislation would create and maintain at least 13 million good-paying jobs, while making our country more productive, efficient and safe. And I promise you as president I will lead that legislation into law.”

7. Raise the minimum wage and fight for living wages. “The current federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour is a starvation wage and must be raised. The minimum wage must become a living wage, which means raising it to $15 an hour over the next few years—which is exactly what Los Angeles recently did, and I applaud them for doing that. Our goal as a nation must be to ensure that no full-time worker lives in poverty.”


This is well worth the read.

Who's face should go on the ten dollar bill?

Rep Barbara Jordan

Barbara Jordan
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Barbara Jordan
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Texas's 18th district
In office January 3, 1973 – January 3, 1979
Preceded by Bob Price
Succeeded by Mickey Leland

Member of the Texas Senate from the 11th district
In office 1967–1973
Preceded by William T. "Bill" Moore
Succeeded by Chet Brooks

Personal details
Born Barbara Charline Jordan
February 21, 1936
Houston, Texas, U.S.
Died January 17, 1996 (aged 59)
Austin, Texas, U.S.
Resting place Texas State Cemetery
Political party Democratic
Alma mater Texas Southern University
Boston University
Profession Attorney
Religion Baptist

Barbara Charline Jordan (February 21, 1936 – January 17, 1996) was an American politician and a leader of the Civil Rights movement. A Democrat, she was the first African American elected to the Texas Senate after Reconstruction, the first southern black female elected to the United States House of Representatives, and the first African-American woman to deliver the keynote address at a Democratic National Convention. She received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, among numerous other honors. She was a member of the Peabody Awards Board of Jurors from 1978 to 1980. On her death, she became the first African-American woman to be buried in the Texas State Cemetery.

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