HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » marble falls » Journal
Page: « Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 26 Next »

marble falls

Profile Information

Name: herb morehead
Gender: Do not display
Hometown: marble falls, tx
Member since: Thu Feb 23, 2012, 04:49 AM
Number of posts: 9,342

About Me

EPO.87WpxS

Journal Archives

Kosher Pot Coming to New York State


Kosher Pot Coming to New York State

The Orthodox Union has certified medical marijuana products from Vireo Health as kosher.
By Stav Ziv / Newsweek
December 31, 2015



http://www.alternet.org/drugs/kosher-pot-new-york-state
December 31, 2015
Stav Ziv

Posted with permission from Newsweek


Any potential medical marijuana users in New York state who were concerned that partaking in pot for health purposes might clash with Judaism can stop shvitzing. The Orthodox Union has certified the marijuana products made by Vireo Health of New York as kosher, the latter announced Wednesday.

“Being certified kosher by the OU will not only help us serve the dietary needs of the largest Jewish community in the United States, but also combat unfortunate stigmas associated with medical cannabis,” Ari Hoffnung, Vireo’s CEO, is quoted as saying in the company’s press release announcing the certification, which applies to the company’s vaporization cartridges, oils and capsules. “Today’s announcement sends an important message to New Yorkers of all faiths and backgrounds,” he added. “Patients should never feel guilty or ashamed for using a product recommended by their physicians.”

Vireo, formerly called Empire State Health Solutions, is one of five companies approved by the state to produce and sell medical marijuana under the Compassionate Care Act, signed into law by Governor Andrew Cuomo in July 2014. New York is one of 23 states, plus the District of Columbia, that have legalized the production and use of medical marijuana for qualifying patients.

New York’s law states that eligible patients are those who have been diagnosed with “a specific severe, debilitating or life-threatening condition”—the list currently includes cancer, HIV infection or AIDS, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury with spasticity, epilepsy, inflammatory bowel disease, neuropathy and Huntington's disease—accompanied by a complicating condition, like severe or chronic pain, severe nausea or seizures.

The law allows liquid, oil and capsules for oral administration as well as for vaporization, but “expressly provides that a certified medical use of marijuana does not include smoking,” according to its department of health.

In everyday English usage, the word kosher means proper or acceptable, but in the context of Judaism, it refers to specific religious laws that govern food preparation and consumption. For example, meat and dairy cannot be made or eaten together and pork and shellfish are prohibited. Kitchen and manufacturing equipment must also meet certain standards.

A broad range of foods require kosher supervision, according to the Orthodox Union, because “all units and subunits in a food item must be kosher as well. Thus, for example, a cereal may be non-kosher because it has raisins which are coated with a non-kosher, animal-based glycerin.”

OU Kosher supervises roughly 70 percent of kosher-certified foods in the U.S., including for major companies like Coca-Cola, General Mills, the Hershey Company, Kraft/Nabisco and Unilever. According to Vireo’s release, it will be the first medical cannabis company to receive a kosher certification from OU. Rabbinic field representatives visited and inspected Vireo’s cultivation and lab facilities in Perth, New York, to verify that the company would meet all kosher standards.

Many Orthodox rabbis support the use of medical marijuana (but not recreational pot), The Forward reported earlier this year. In the past, the Orthodox Union has refused to give kosher certifications to cigarette and e-cigarette companies because of the associated health risks, but OU Kosher COO Rabbi Moshe Elefant said at the time that it “would not have a problem certifying” medical marijuana.

The cannabis plant itself does not require a kosher stamp of approval, but capsules and other manufactured forms of it do. "Just as the OU gives out Kosher certificates for vitamins or for any other medical product, after an examination of the ingredients, it is possible in principle to issue kosher certificates for cannabis, as long it is solely for medical uses and in countries where it is permitted by law," Rabbi Avi Berman, executive director of OU Israel, told the Israeli site Ynet in February.

Nearly a year later, OU Kosher has signed off on Vireo’s medical cannabis products, “which were developed to alleviate pain and suffering in accordance with the New York State Compassionate Care Act,” Rabbi Menachem Genack, CEO of OU Kosher, is quoted as saying in Vireo’s release. The company plans to open four dispensaries in the state in January—in White Plains, the New York City borough of Queens, Binghamton and Albany.

“Judaism prioritizes health and encourages the use of medicine designed to improve one’s health or reduce pain,” Genack said. “Using medical cannabis products recommended by a physician should not be regarded as a chet, a sinful act, but rather as a mitzvah, an imperative, a commandment.”
Posted by marble falls | Fri Jan 8, 2016, 10:14 AM (8 replies)

PETA Trolls Oregon’s Militant Ranchers With Vegan-Jerky Delivery


Trolling 101
January 6, 2016 2:55 p.m.
PETA Trolls Oregon’s Militant Ranchers With Vegan-Jerky Delivery
By Chris Crowley

http://www.grubstreet.com/2016/01/peta-trolls-militant-ranchers-vegan-jerky.html?om_rid=AAAgmh&om_mid=_BWjry9B9Ja$8v7#

The militant ranchers who are protesting federal policies by occupying an Oregon bird sanctuary, the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, have appealed for snacks, and PETA has answered the call by trolling them with a delivery of vegan jerky. PETA being PETA, it's taking the opportunity to spin this from a story about armed citizens threatening violence and illegally taking over buildings into one about the evils of animal agriculture.

The animals-rights organization says in a blog post that the package will fashionably be "hand-delivered" to the ranchers, now calling themselves Citizens for Constitutional Freedom, by staffers with signs reading, "The End (of Animal Agriculture) Is Nigh: Get Out Now!" Twitter, predictably, reacted to PETA's preachy tweets with scorn — asking, "You for real?" — but others have gotten in on the fun, too, with Redditors planning baby food and glitter packages and The Oregonian running a joke poll on the top snacks to send ranchers with the munchies. As that publication pointed out, Ammon Bundy, one of the ringleaders of the group, said that he and his pals are so committed that they're willing to stay for years, but apparently they all forgot to ask their moms to pack their lunch boxes for the field trip.

2 PETA reps show up @ OR wildlife refuge, giving vegan jerky to protesters, asking them to stay out of animal ag. pic.twitter.com/mlrsa4IJI3
— Joe Fryer (@joefryer) January 6, 2016


Posted by marble falls | Thu Jan 7, 2016, 04:23 PM (7 replies)

Grand Juries: How The Tamir Rice Case Lifts The Veil On This Inherently Biased Process

Grand Juries: How The Tamir Rice Case Lifts The Veil On This Inherently Biased Process

January 1, 2016 by Dylan Donnelly 3 Comments

http://www.copblock.org/150762/grand-juries-how-tamir-rice-case-lifts-veil-on-inherently-biased-process-2/

This post was submitted by Vincent Rivera, Licensed Kansas Attorney

“A grand jury will indict a ham sandwich,” the saying goes. This is because, in grand juries, prosecutors enjoy zero oversight, leaving them free to present (or not present) whatever evidence they choose without any challenges, and in effect avoiding any political backlash.

For those not familiar with Grand Juries: they do not make a guilty/innocent decision. Their job is decide whether or not probable cause exists to file criminal charges.

Generally, Prosecutors impanel about 24 “grand jurors.” From there, it’s similar to a trial, the Prosecutor calls witnesses, and presents evidence. However, unlike a trial, a Grand Jury, is held in private, there is no judge, and no defense counsel. Thus, the prosecutor is allowed to present any evidence they want without interference or challenges.

Politically speaking, in high profile cases, prosecutors can “stack the deck” to avoid an indictment. Thus, when the Grand Jury fails to indict, it was the Grand Jury’s decision and not the prosecutor’s fault. This allows the prosecutors (who’re often elected) to avoid any responsibility for failing to prosecute.

In the Tamir Rice case, the Grand Jury failed to find probable cause to indict the officer. During that Grand Jury, the Prosecutor went out of their way to call in a “use of force” expert witness, who essentially “rubber stamped” Law Enforcement’s actions. Thus, in essence the Prosecutor presented a case of “justified force” to the Grand Jury and SURPRISE: no indictment.

Suggested reforms:
1) Preliminary Hearings, preform the same job as a Grand Jury in that their purpose is to determine probable cause. However, a preliminary hearing is conducted in open court, before a Judge (who makes the probable cause finding), the accused is present and represented by counsel who can cross-examine witnesses, object to evidence, call defense witnesses and make arguments to the Court.
2) Don’t use “local” prosecutors. Prosecutors work every single day with law enforcement. Moreover almost every prosecutor’s office has attorneys and or staff who are married/dating law enforcement. Clearly, this presents a conflict of interest, with the “fox guarding the hen house.”

These problems could be mitigated if States create a special group of Prosecutors, perhaps from the Attorney General’s office, who investigates all law enforcement shootings.
Posted by marble falls | Sat Jan 2, 2016, 09:34 AM (0 replies)

Bar owner: Suspect in Rochester attack plot is a panhandler

Why are we funding this sort of investigation looking for terrorists? All of the "domestic terrorists" we've found are of this caliber.

http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/US_TERROR_SUSPECT?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2016-01-01-22-13-57

Bar owner: Suspect in Rochester attack plot is a panhandler


ROCHESTER, N.Y. (AP) -- An ex-convict arrested in a plot to carry out an attack at a bar on New Year's Eve is a panhandler who'd been a story of mental problems.

Federal authorities have said Emanuel Lutchman, 25, sought to prove he was worthy of joining the Islamic State group by leading an attack in Rochester with a machete and knives provided by an FBI informant.

After authorities announced his arrest Thursday, his father and mother described a man who'd had psychiatric troubles since childhood, had recently stabbed himself in a suicide attempt and, they said, wouldn't have conducted the attack on his own.

"The boy is impressionable," his father, Omar Lutchman, told NBC News. "First he was a Blood, then he was a Crip, then he became a Muslim. He's easily manipulated."

The father and the suspect's grandmother, Beverley Carridice-Henry, told the network Lutchman is married and has a 2-year-old son but had been having marital and money problems. He was frustrated over being unable to find work and care for his family, they said.

"He got very emotional and sick about that," Carridice-Henry told the Democrat and Chronicle of Rochester.

Authorities said in court papers that Lutchman said he received direction from an overseas Islamic State group member and planned to carry out the attack Thursday.

"I will take a life, I don't have a problem with that," the court papers quoted Lutchman as saying.

Lutchman's lawyer, Steven Slawinski, declined to comment on the allegations. Lutchman has been charged with attempting to provide material support to terrorists.

While authorities didn't identify the target, a co-owner said it was Merchants Grill, a neighborhood sports pub. The U.S. attorney's office for western New York did not return a phone call Friday seeking confirmation of that.

Lutchman lived nearby and had repeatedly come into the bar asking for money, co-owner John Page told local media. He told WHEC-TV that Lutchman had been asked to leave several times.

He "caused more trouble than positive," Page told the Democrat and Chronicle.

Lutchman was described in court papers as having a long criminal history, including a 2006 robbery conviction that led to a five-year prison sentence.

Lutchman's former stepmother, Charma Lutchman, told the Democrat and Chronicle that Lutchman spent part of his childhood living with his grandparents in New York City. She said that while young, he was struck by a car, an accident that transformed him from a happy-go-lucky boy to a more withdrawn child.

The newspaper reports Lutchman spent four months in a Rochester jail in 2015 on misdemeanor charges of petit larceny and menacing his girlfriend.

Lutchman was scheduled to appear in state court Jan. 11 on the domestic violence charges. It's likely that date will be postponed.

---

This story has been corrected to show the call letters for a Rochester TV station are WHEC-TV, not WEHC-TV.

© 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Learn more about our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Entire Florida police department busted for laundering millions for international drug cartels

Source: Raw Story

Entire Florida police department busted for laundering millions for international drug cartels
Justin Gardner, Free Thought Project

02 Jan 2016 at 00:44 ET



Screenshot from "License to Launder" (Miami Herald)


The village of Bal Harbour, population 2,513, may have a tiny footprint on the northern tip of Miami Beach, but its police department had grand aspirations of going after international drug traffickers, and making a few million dollars while they were at it.

The Bal Harbour PD and the Glades County Sheriff’s Office set up a giant money laundering scheme with the purported goal of busting drug cartels and stemming the surge of drug dealing going on in the area. But it all fell apart when federal investigators and the Miami-Herald found strange things going on.


The two-year operation, which took in more than $55 million from criminal groups, resulted in zero arrests but netted $2.4 million for the police posing as money launderers. Members of the 12-person task force traveled far and wide to carry out their deals, from Los Angeles to New York to Puerto Rico.

<snip>

“They were like bank robbers with badges,” said Dennis Fitzgerald, an attorney and former Drug Enforcement Administration agent who taught undercover tactics for the U.S. State Department. “It had no law enforcement objective. The objective was to make money.”

<snip>

Video at link.

The War on Drugs is the real scheme that should be investigated.

Read more: http://www.rawstory.com/2016/01/entire-florida-police-department-busted-for-laundering-millions-for-international-drug-cartels/



A bit long but worth the time.

We're looking to cut the cable and bundlers, is there a good hot spot for home use?

What do we need to look for? We want to Skype for phone and use a service for TV.

Would it be better to use a local internet supplier instead. We do travel and have concerns with public wi-fi.

Please help some old technology-challenged folks out!!!!

What Went Wrong With The South Is What Went Wrong With America

http://www.alternet.org/economy/what-went-wrong-south-what-went-wrong-america

What Went Wrong With The South Is What Went Wrong With America
An economy built on a violent system of unpaid forced labor, replaced by a violent system of underpaid exploitative labor.
By Alyson Zandt / Facing South
November 6, 2015



Photo Credit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavery_in_the_United_States


<snip>

"The Deep South's paralyzing intergenerational poverty is the devastating sum of problems both historical and emergent — ones that, in the life of a young man, can build in childhood and then erupt in early adulthood," says Harlan. These young people "deal with traumas at home and dysfunction at school — only to find themselves, as graduates, searching for low-paying jobs in states that have been reluctant to fund programs that help the poor."


An accompanying infographic, which maps life expectancy, children living with one parent, unbanked households, median household income, and income mobility, poses a solemn question:




What went wrong is centuries of enslavement and systemic discrimination that resulted in the immense disparities we see today — but most news stories don't capture that context. What went wrong with the Deep South is, in many ways, what went wrong with America. In the South, the effects of our nation's enduring racism are most apparent, and it's hard to overstate the continued legacy of slavery. The American economy was built on the wealth created by a violent system of free labor. The economic motivation for that system was most apparent in the agricultural South, and so people in this region went to increasingly great lengths over time to preserve it in spite of contradictions with American ideals of equality. The narrative of racial difference that was created to justify that system is still with us.

<snip>

So, what went wrong in the South? A long history of social and economic inequity, which is most apparent in the places that pop out on the Washington Post's interactive map. The historical roots of this swath of concentrated poverty and low mobility can easily be traced back to the 17th century (or even to the Cretaceous era, as the places with the largest populations of enslaved people were where the soil was the best for growing cotton, which follows the pattern of ancient coastlines). In 1860, 78 percent of people in Sunflower County, Mississippi, the setting of Harlan's article, were enslaved. A map showing the percentage of the total population that was enslaved in 1860 by county bears remarkable similarity to the pattern of those Washington Post maps:



<snip>

Breakdowns in educational and economic opportunity like those Harlan describes in the Deep South may appear unique to a small number of communities, but they are indicative of broader systemic failures. Harlan mostly focuses on the issues facing economically isolated rural communities, but the accompanying map of low mobility shows that low-income young people are struggling even in some of the South's most prosperous and dynamic metros. If we want to make national progress on equity, opportunity, and mobility, then we have to figure out how to reduce disparities in the South and in those communities where economic insecurity is greatest. The Infrastructure of Opportunity varies noticeably in quality, consistency, and accessibility across the U.S.; that doesn't have to continue to be the case.





Alyson Zandt writes for the State of The South blog. She was Manpower Development Corp's 2009-2010 Autry Fellow and is manages research and analysis for its State of the South report, which features analysis of state and regional data and calls on the region to develop and implement purposeful policies and systemic practices—an “infrastructure of opportunity”—to bolster the prospects for its 15- to 24-year-olds to achieve economic resilience and a fulfilling social and civic life.

Ben Carson: Uneducated people are easily tricked into voting for free education

Ben Carson: Uneducated people are easily tricked into voting for free education
Bethania Palma Markus

11 Nov 2015 at 13:53 ET

http://www.rawstory.com/2015/11/ben-carson-uneducated-people-are-easily-tricked-into-voting-for-free-education/?utm_source=fark&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=rawstory




GOP presidential hopeful Ben Carson on Wednesday seemed to give contradicting statements when he said it was very easy to mislead uneducated people into thinking that providing college education was a good thing.

The remarks, made at Liberty University in Virginia, seemed to be a swipe at Democratic candidate Bernie Sanders, who has said that higher education should be funded by states and the federal government, according to The Hill. Carson said doing so would lead to “the destruction of the nation.”

<snip>

“It becomes easy to swallow things,” the retired neurosurgeon told the audience. “If you don’t understand our financial situation and someone comes along and says, ‘free college for everybody,’ they’ll say, ‘oh how wonderful,’ and have no idea they’re talking about hastening the destruction of the nation.”

<snip>

But Carson, a devout Christian, has chalked it all up to being unfairly treated by the “gotcha” media, telling the crowd at the Christian university he has relied on his faith to remain unfazed, according to The Hill.



Hey, it makes sense to him.

How Law Enforcement Can Use Google Timeline To Track Your Every Move

https://theintercept.com/2015/11/06/how-law-enforcement-can-use-google-timeline-to-track-your-every-move/

How Law Enforcement Can Use Google Timeline To Track Your Every Move
Jana Winter

Nov. 6 2015, 8:53 a.m.

THE RECENT EXPANSION of Google’s Timeline feature can provide investigators unprecedented access to users’ location history data, allowing them in many cases to track a person’s every move over the course of years, according to a report recently circulated to law enforcement.

“The personal privacy implications are pretty clear but so are the law enforcement applications,” according to the document, titled “Google Timelines: Location Investigations Involving Android Devices,” which outlines the kind of information investigators can now obtain.

The Timeline allows users to look back at their daily movements on a map; that same information is also potentially of interest to law enforcement. “It is now possible to submit a legal demand to Google for location history greater than six months old,” the report says. “This could revitalize cold cases and potentially help solve active investigations.”

<snip>



“Consider including Gmail, photos and videos, search history, contacts, applications, other connected devices, Google Voice and Google Wallet, if they are relevant to the investigation,” the report suggests. Investigators are also advised to include a non-disclosure order with their search warrants for Google data, which prevents the company from notifying the account holder that their data is being provided to law enforcement.

<snip>


Intelligence gathering is now ready to be privatized.

The Agency (not the one you think)

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/07/magazine/the-agency.html?_r=1


The Agency
Around 8:30 a.m. on Sept. 11 last year, Duval Arthur, director of the Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness for St. Mary Parish, Louisiana, got a call from a resident who had just received a disturbing text message. “Toxic fume hazard warning in this area until 1:30 PM,” the message read. “Take Shelter. Check Local Media and columbiachemical.com.”


By ADRIAN CHENJUNE 2, 2015


St. Mary Parish is home to many processing plants for chemicals and natural gas, and keeping track of dangerous accidents at those plants is Arthur’s job. But he hadn’t heard of any chemical release that morning. In fact, he hadn’t even heard of Columbia Chemical. St. Mary Parish had a Columbian Chemicals plant, which made carbon black, a petroleum product used in rubber and plastics. But he’d heard nothing from them that morning, either. Soon, two other residents called and reported the same text message. Arthur was worried: Had one of his employees sent out an alert without telling him?

If Arthur had checked Twitter, he might have become much more worried. Hundreds of Twitter accounts were documenting a disaster right down the road. “A powerful explosion heard from miles away happened at a chemical plant in Centerville, Louisiana #ColumbianChemicals,” a man named Jon Merritt tweeted. The #ColumbianChemicals hashtag was full of eyewitness accounts of the horror in Centerville. @AnnRussela shared an image of flames engulfing the plant. @Ksarah12 posted a video of surveillance footage from a local gas station, capturing the flash of the explosion. Others shared a video in which thick black smoke rose in the distance.

Dozens of journalists, media outlets and politicians, from Louisiana to New York City, found their Twitter accounts inundated with messages about the disaster. “Heather, I’m sure that the explosion at the #ColumbianChemicals is really dangerous. Louisiana is really screwed now,” a user named @EricTraPPP tweeted at the New Orleans Times-Picayune reporter Heather Nolan. Another posted a screenshot of CNN’s home page, showing that the story had already made national news. ISIS had claimed credit for the attack, according to one YouTube video; in it, a man showed his TV screen, tuned to an Arabic news channel, on which masked ISIS fighters delivered a speech next to looping footage of an explosion. A woman named Anna McClaren (@zpokodon9) tweeted at Karl Rove: “Karl, Is this really ISIS who is responsible for #ColumbianChemicals? Tell @Obama that we should bomb Iraq!” But anyone who took the trouble to check CNN.com would have found no news of a spectacular Sept. 11 attack by ISIS. It was all fake: the screenshot, the videos, the photographs.

In St. Mary Parish, Duval Arthur quickly made a few calls and found that none of his employees had sent the alert. He called Columbian Chemicals, which reported no problems at the plant. Roughly two hours after the first text message was sent, the company put out a news release, explaining that reports of an explosion were false. When I called Arthur a few months later, he dismissed the incident as a tasteless prank, timed to the anniversary of the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. “Personally I think it’s just a real sad, sick sense of humor,” he told me. “It was just someone who just liked scaring the daylights out of people.” Authorities, he said, had tried to trace the numbers that the text messages had come from, but with no luck. (The F.B.I. told me the investigation was still open.)


The Columbian Chemicals hoax was not some simple prank by a bored sadist. It was a highly coordinated disinformation campaign, involving dozens of fake accounts that posted hundreds of tweets for hours, targeting a list of figures precisely chosen to generate maximum attention. The perpetrators didn’t just doctor screenshots from CNN; they also created fully functional clones of the websites of Louisiana TV stations and newspapers. The YouTube video of the man watching TV had been tailor-made for the project. A Wikipedia page was even created for the Columbian Chemicals disaster, which cited the fake YouTube video. As the virtual assault unfolded, it was complemented by text messages to actual residents in St. Mary Parish. It must have taken a team of programmers and content producers to pull off.

And the hoax was just one in a wave of similar attacks during the second half of last year. On Dec. 13, two months after a handful of Ebola cases in the United States touched off a minor media panic, many of the same Twitter accounts used to spread the Columbian Chemicals hoax began to post about an outbreak of Ebola in Atlanta. The campaign followed the same pattern of fake news reports and videos, this time under the hashtag #EbolaInAtlanta, which briefly trended in Atlanta. Again, the attention to detail was remarkable, suggesting a tremendous amount of effort. A YouTube video showed a team of hazmat-suited medical workers transporting a victim from the airport. Beyoncé’s recent single “7/11” played in the background, an apparent attempt to establish the video’s contemporaneity. A truck in the parking lot sported the logo of the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.

On the same day as the Ebola hoax, a totally different group of accounts began spreading a rumor that an unarmed black woman had been shot to death by police. They all used the hashtag #shockingmurderinatlanta. Here again, the hoax seemed designed to piggyback on real public anxiety; that summer and fall were marked by protests over the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. In this case, a blurry video purports to show the shooting, as an onlooker narrates. Watching it, I thought I recognized the voice — it sounded the same as the man watching TV in the Columbian Chemicals video, the one in which ISIS supposedly claims responsibility. The accent was unmistakable, if unplaceable, and in both videos he was making a very strained attempt to sound American. Somehow the result was vaguely Australian.

Who was behind all of this? When I stumbled on it last fall, I had an idea. I was already investigating a shadowy organization in St. Petersburg, Russia, that spreads false information on the Internet. It has gone by a few names, but I will refer to it by its best known: the Internet Research Agency. The agency had become known for employing hundreds of Russians to post pro-Kremlin propaganda online under fake identities, including on Twitter, in order to create the illusion of a massive army of supporters; it has often been called a “troll farm.” The more I investigated this group, the more links I discovered between it and the hoaxes. In April, I went to St. Petersburg to learn more about the agency and its brand of information warfare, which it has aggressively deployed against political opponents at home, Russia’s perceived enemies abroad and, more recently, me.


http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/07/magazine/the-agency.html?_r=1


LONG story well worth the read.
Posted by marble falls | Mon Nov 2, 2015, 11:05 AM (0 replies)
Go to Page: « Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 26 Next »