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marble falls

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Hometown: marble falls, tx
Member since: Thu Feb 23, 2012, 04:49 AM
Number of posts: 9,536

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Journal Archives

Insight on Super-Delegates

Al Franken on Super-Delegates



Federal Lawsuit: Farmers Claim Monsanto's Controversial 'Roundup' Weedkiller Gave Them Cancer

http://www.alternet.org/food/federal-lawsuit-farmers-claim-monsantos-controversial-roundup-weedkiller-gave-them-cancer

Federal Lawsuit: Farmers Claim Monsanto's Controversial 'Roundup' Weedkiller Gave Them Cancer
Despite Monsanto's claim that its glyphosate weedkiller is "safe enough to drink," four Nebraska farmers say it gave them non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
By Ted Wheeler / Courthouse News
May 13, 2016


LINCOLN, Neb. (CN) — Despite Monsanto's claim that its Roundup weed-killer is "safe enough to drink," four Nebraska farmers say the widely used herbicide gave them non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

The World Health Organization's International Agency for Research on Cancer classifies glyphosate as "probably carcinogenic to humans" but Monsanto has promoted Roundup as "safe enough to drink," the farmers say in their federal lawsuit.

"Roundup is used by Nebraskans raising everything from grain to grass and tulips to trees. Nothing on the label alerts users to health risks," their attorney David Domina said in an interview. "Nebraskans deserve the benefit of the WHO research, and protection against unknown exposure."

Monsanto, based in St. Louis, is the world's largest producer of glyphosate herbicides. The company made $4.8 billion from Roundup sales last year. It is applied to "Roundup-ready" crops that are genetically modified to resist it.

Ubiquitous in hardware stores for home use nationwide, Roundup is used in commercial agriculture on more than 100 varieties of crops. More than 85 million lbs. of glyphosate was applied to U.S. crops in 2001, and its use more than doubled, to 185 million lbs., by 2007, according to the complaint.

"Glyphosate is found in rivers, streams, and groundwater in agricultural areas where Roundup is used. It has been found in food, the urine of exposed persons, and in the urine of urban dwellers without direct contact with glyphosate," the 48-page complaint states.

California last year became the first state to label Roundup as a carcinogen, based on the IARC research, and Monsanto then sued the state to fight the designation.

<rest of the story at the link>

Dealer Alleges Fire That Destroyed Rare JDM Cars Caused by Illegal Marijuana Growing Operation

Dealer Alleges Fire That Destroyed Rare JDM Cars Caused by Illegal Marijuana Growing Operation

http://www.roadandtrack.com/car-culture/news/a29138/international-vehicle-importers-warehouse-fire/

By Chris Perkins
May 12, 2016



Earlier this month we told you about a warehouse fire that destroyed much of the inventory of International Vehicle Importers, a California dealer that specializes in importing rare and sought-after Japanese domestic market cars. At the time, the cause the fire wasn't known, but now the owner of the shop says he knows how the blaze occurred. It's a bizarre and tragic tale.

A post by International Vehicle Importers owner Sean Morris on the company's Facebook page alleges that the fire was caused by an overloaded electrical circuit, caused by an illegal marijuana growing operation that had just started up in the warehouse next door.

Unlike Morris, the Ontario Fire Department isn't ready to say that the illegal marijuana operation was the cause of the fire. "In regards to the structure fire in question there has been no indication that the cause was related to the illegal activity at the location," said Ontario, Calif. Deputy Fire Chief Mike Pelletier, in a statement emailed to Road & Track Thursday.

While an investigation is still ongoing, Brent Correggia, Investigation Supervisor for the Ontario Calif. Fire Department said "we're not finding anything linking to the fire," in a phone interview with Road & Track. Additionally, Correggia said there was no damage at the marijuana operation.


What appears to be a search warrant describing marijuana parephenalia, as posted by International Vehicle Importers
Facebook International Vehicle Importers

In a phone interview with Road & Track, Morris said the alleged illegal marijuana growers posed as tile importers, and began moving into the warehouse next door to International Vehicle Importers on Sunday May 1st. The fire broke out that same day.

"On that Sunday, some of guys there noticed there were some people around next door, but didn't really pay any attention," said Morris. "A half-hour after they left, we had a fire.

"They had just started to move in, turned on their stuff, and it was enough to overload the circuit."



the rarest of the 24 cars destroyed were a 1990 Nissan Skyline GT-R Nismo, a 1994 Eunos (Mazda) Cosmo imported under Show or Display law, and a 2000 Nissan Skyline GT-R race car imported as a documented race car. All of the dealer's JDM vehicles are over 25 years old–and thus, eligible for import to the U.S.–or imported under Show or Display and race car exemptions. In addition, three motorhomes, a number of motorcycles, and various personal items were destroyed in the fire. Morris says two of his dogs were killed in the blaze.



The Dodge Viper ACR Creates So Much Downforce It Reduces MPG While Being Towed

The Dodge Viper ACR Creates So Much Downforce It Reduces MPG While Being Towed

http://www.roadandtrack.com/car-culture/news/a29151/dodge-viper-acr-towing-economy/


Ralph Gilles
By Andrew Del-Colle
May 12, 2016



<SNIP>

While the Viper's various aerodynamic features are great for hurtling around the racetrack—the ACR creates more than 1700 pounds of peak downforce—they also result in a very high drag coefficient of .541. For comparison, a Prius, one of the slipperiest production cars ever made, has a coefficient of .24.

As an example of just how much drag the ACR creates, Reece mentioned that Ralph Gilles—the man behind the newest generation of the Viper, former president and CEO of SRT, and current head of design for Fiat Chrysler—saw a noticeable drop in his efficiency whenever he started towing his personal ACR on his open-air trailer. How great is that?

Gilles saw a difference of 2 mpg between towing his Viper GTS (pictured above) and the ACR.
Ralph Gilles

Since then, this amusing fact has been bouncing around my skull, so I sent Gilles a message to follow-up. He quickly got back to me and not only confirmed the story, but provided a few more details along with some pictures.

"I tow with my EcoDiesel Grand Cherokee, which normally would get 20-21mpg towing my GTS, and got 18-19 towing the ACR," he wrote. "I am in the process of fashioning a simple device that stalls the rear wing (fills in the top)."

<SNIP>

My unintended experiance with being "uninsured"

My wife and I both came down with what her doctor diagnosed as bronchitis. No problem: her Cadillac health care plan after 28 years with the CIA covered everything for her. I'm on VA health care and because I used to get bronchitis almost every year and because neither of us could take the 50 mile drive to my primary care physician in Austin or 80 miles to Temple Medical center I decided to hunker down: rest, push fluids and shelter in place.

That was Monday.

Thursday, neither of us were any better and were decidedly worse, in fact.

I called VA to get authorization to use the local hospital emergency room.

At Scott and White I got incredibly good and quick service. Second only to the care I get at VA.

What I had was type B influenza. You know, the one not covered by this flu season's inoculation.

What I also got was $250+ in prescriptions and a bill I haven't seen yet that I am confident will be more than a $1000.

This is the sort of thing that will make some people miss rent, a car payment, a weeks work, lose a job, become homeless. We've all heard that the average American is four or so paychecks from the streets.

The biggest thing I learned? We need single-payer now more than ever. ACA was a good start, lets get to the next logical and better step. Oh, and regulating the vampire pharmaceutical industry is a necessity, also. For the price of the codeine cough syrup alone I could have bought a good bindle of smack on the street. Something is very wrong.

Meanwhile: back to my sick bed.

Leave all those historic Confederacy statues stand.

Just remove the sabers from their hands and add a torch and in the other hand add chains attached a group of slaves.

All they need is context.
Posted by marble falls | Tue May 3, 2016, 09:01 AM (1 replies)

Ber-llary: Merging Hillary and Bernie


Ber-llary: Merging Hillary and Bernie
04/22/2016 07:41 am ET | Updated 3 hours ago
248

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/richard-brodsky/ber-llary-merging-hillary_b_9756652.html

Carlo Allegri / Reuters

Hillary’s victory in New York was big and important. She reminded us of what we like about her, and actually connected with people. She effectively focused attention on what she did well as a Senator and a candidate. She put it together smartly, but there’s a “Thank you Bernie” needed as well.

Bernie’s primary campaign has saved Hillary. She’s been tested, she’s moved, she’s finally getting her legs under her, all because of Bernie and his minions. The minor hoo-hah about Bernie’s attacks will disappear. What will stay is his powerful ability to define both the politics and policies of 2016. He’s leading a movement, not just running for a job.

Bernie took the insights and the cri de couer of Occupy Wall Street and gave them structure and political stature. Sort of like what FDR did with Norman Thomas, Bella Abzug did with Betty Freidan, and Obama with Dr. King and Malcom X. It’s a traditional American dynamic and refreshes the body politic every time.

There’s a dark side to the politics of 2016 that underscores the danger that both Hillary and Bernie face. Trump is a serious threat in November. He’s not a right-wing ideologue, selling supply-side snake oil. His economic populism on trade, out-sourcing, taxing hedge funds, and maintaining Social Security and Medicare enrages the Kochs, Cruz, Fox News and the Conservative Establishment. But it resonates with voters who are focused on their economic condition. The outrageous language and ideas about immigration, punishing women, gender and orientation equality and the like are likely to drag him down in the end. But on the battlefield of the economy, he’s a tough nut to crack.

Bernie’s movement has the muscle, breadth and economic ideas to counter-punch Trump effectively. Will they?

Bernie will try, no doubt. He understands that no good can come out of baying at the moon after the convention. His foot soldiers, not so much. For the aged among us, we remember the consequences of abandoning Hubert Humphrey in the 1968 campaign against Nixon, and the Nader effect on 2000’s Bush-Gore contest. Something has to be done to avoid a third debacle.

Imagine the consequences for peace, prosperity and justice of President Trump. Even so, it will be hard to scare the Berners into supporting Hillary. The responsibility is on her by word and deed to welcome the movement into her campaign. Symbols will matter. Ideas will matter. She can’t win without the energy and votes that support Bernie.

She needs to do more than a pro forma welcome the losing camp into the fold. It’s hard to predict the mechanics of a Bernie-Hillary merger. Offering the Veep spot, keynote speeches, lots of joint campaigning are all necessary, but not sufficient. We’ll need a little magic as well.

There are Clinton camp forces that will advise her to do little, the same forces that gave us Bob Rubin and repeal of Glass-Steagall. Hillary has to figure this one out for herself and move decisively and smartly to keep the progressives together. Not easy. Possible. Necessary.
Follow Richard Brodsky on Twitter: www.twitter.com/RichardBrodsky

33 Things I Hate About This Election, in No Particular Order


33 Things I Hate About This Election, in No Particular Order

By Ijeoma Oluo / The Establishment
April 19, 2016

http://www.alternet.org/election-2016/33-things-i-hate-about-election-no-particular-order

1. When Bernie supporters use “whore” in the pejorative when referring to Hillary

2. When Hillary Clinton said she keeps hot sauce in her bag

3. Marco Rubio’s suits

4. Every reference to Bernie marching with MLK

5. Hillary’s AIPAC speech

6. Donald Trump

7. Everyone who tells me it’s my duty to vote for one of these assholes

8. John Kasich’s haircut

9. Every white woman who says that it’s your feminist duty to vote for Hillary

10. Every dude who says women only vote for Hillary because she’s a woman

11. The fact that after every primary I have to hear clips of Trump’s gross speeches over and over even on fucking NPR

12. That time Hillary pretended to be your abuela

13. Every time a politician tours a poor black neighborhood like they’ve landed in a National Geographic documentary

14. Every time somebody asks Jonathan Chait what he thinks about the election

15. Every dinner party when somebody goes, “Sooo ... how about this election?” and you can’t legally stab them in the eye with a fork

16. Every former high school classmate that you didn’t know was a Trump supporter

17. Every dude who has tried to explain to me how elections work

18. Every time Carly Fiorina vividly imagined seeing video of human fetuses being torn apart

19. That time all the dudes were talking about their dick sizes

20. Every dude who has told Hillary to lower her voice

21. Every poll about which candidate is more “likable”

22. Every reader who is now adding up complaints to demand that I insult Hillary or Bernie a few more times to make this listicle fair

23. Every has-been celebrity who emerged from obscurity just to destroy our childhood with their candidate endorsement

24. Every person who has guessed at my political affiliation from a single tweet and proceeded to lecture me on why that assumed affiliation is wrong

25. Every joke every candidate has tried to make

26. Every person who says that we have to respect the beliefs of racist, hate-filled Trump followers

27. Every person who has used “illegals” in their political posts when referring to living, breathing human beings

28. Every transphobic “bathroom bill”

29. Everybody who has ever used the phrase “American values” without irony

30. Every white dude who thinks that his support of Bernie is a civil rights revolution

31. That time I felt like I had to defend Megyn Kelly

32. Every person on Twitter who thinks they can annoy you into supporting their candidate

33. Bill Clinton

Ijeoma Oluo is the Editor-At-Large of The Establishment. A Seattle-based Writer, Speaker, and Internet Yeller, her work has appeared in The Guardian, The Stranger, New York Magazine, Huffington Post, and more. She was named one of the Most Influential People in Seattle by Seattle Magazine. She's also a columnist at The Seattle Globalist.

What Will Happen When Genetically Engineered Salmon Escape Into the Wild?


What Will Happen When Genetically Engineered Salmon Escape Into the Wild?

The FDA has failed to fully examine the risks this new species of salmon would present to wild salmon.

By Brettny Hardy / AlterNet
April 8, 2016

Print
60 COMMENTS

On the Lower Stanislaus River in California's Central Valley. The chinook salmon is an anadromous fish that is the largest species in the salmon family. Chinook salmon range from San Francisco Bay in California to north of the Bering Strait in Alaska, and the waters of Canada and Russia. They are highly valued, mostly due to their relative scarcity, compared to other salmon along the Pacific Coast. Nine populations are listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act as either threatened or endangered, including the fall runs found in California's Bay-Delta. USFWS photo/Dan Cox

Photo Credit: Dan Cox/Pacific Southwest Region USFWS/Flickr CC

In late 2015, the Food and Drug Administration gave the greenlight to AquaBounty, Inc., a company poised to create, produce and market an entirely new type of salmon. By combining the genes from three different types of fish, AquaBounty has made a salmon that grows unnaturally fast, reaching adult size twice as fast as its wild relative.

Never before has a country allowed any type of genetically engineered animal to be sold as food. The United States is stepping into new terrain, opening Pandora’s box. But are we ready for the consequences?

In order to answer that question, we must first look back on how we as a nation arrived at this point. Historically, the United States has enjoyed a rich bounty of seafood from the ocean. When I lived in Alaska, I always loved the late summer months when wild salmon would fill the rivers, making their way to spawning grounds. Fresh, wild salmon filets were delicious and abundant. And they still are.
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Unfortunately, outside of Alaska, our poor management of an enormous fishing industry and important habitat has depleted fish stocks all along our coasts. Salmon species, in particular, are sensitive to environmental changes. The development and industrialization of our coast has polluted and dammed the rivers they depend on to breed. Although salmon used to be abundant on both the east and west coasts, large, healthy populations of salmon now exist mostly in Alaska.

Instead of fixing the environmental problems we have created or investing in the protection and recovery of our existing wild salmon resources, some have decided to create a new, genetically engineered fish that brings a host of its own problems and further undermines the sustainability of our food supply.

The genetically engineered salmon that the FDA approved will undertake a journey that stretches halfway around the globe in order to arrive at your dinner table. AquaBounty plans to produce the salmon eggs in a lab on Prince Edward Island in Canada, fly them to Panama to be raised, slaughtered and filleted, and then bring them back to the U.S. so they can be sold to your family. How many tons of greenhouse gases are emitted during that 5,000-mile trip?

That’s a far cry from the farm-to-table experience of eating seafood caught and sold by your local fisherman. Even worse, the FDA has so far refused to require food labels, so you won’t even know if the fish you’re eating is genetically engineered.

The waste and secrecy inherent in this process is bad enough, but the environmental consequences of this decision are potentially enormous. The FDA has failed to fully examine the risks this new species of salmon may present to wild salmon—and the environment—should it escape into the wild, which even some supporters of the FDA decision acknowledge is inevitable.

Once free, these fish will enter a world where wild salmon are already in a precarious state. In this fragile environment, genetically engineered fish would compete with their wild counterparts for food and space, and could even potentially interbreed with them. They will also bring new diseases and cause changes to basic food webs and ecosystem processes that are difficult to anticipate.

Even more concerning is that the FDA does not have the expertise to properly understand the environmental devastation a release of genetically engineered fish could cause. The FDA exists to ensure that the food and drugs we consume are safe for humans, but does not typically evaluate the environmental impacts of putting new types of engineered foods into the ecosystem. The two agencies with actual biological expertise in fisheries and ocean ecosystems, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the Fish and Wildlife Service, were not given the chance to formally review FDA’s approval.

Congress has not created a comprehensive statutory scheme to address the management of genetically engineered products. As a result, agencies are left trying to regulate genetically engineered products under a patchwork of ill-fitting statutes that do not comprehensively address associated environmental and other risks of these new creatures.

This new breed of fish does not herald progress. Instead, it highlights the ways we have devastated many of our wild fish populations and our continuing failure to recover this once-abundant natural food source.

We are opening Pandora’s box, and we are completely unprepared for the consequences.

Editor’s note: The author is the lead attorney on a lawsuit filed in federal court by the non-profit Earthjustice to challenge the FDA’s decision to approve AquaBounty’s genetically engineered salmon. Read more about the case at Earthjustice.

Brettny Hardy works with the Oceans program in the California regional office of Earthjustice.
Posted by marble falls | Sat Apr 9, 2016, 12:54 PM (8 replies)
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