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Name: herb morehead
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Hometown: marble falls, tx
Member since: Thu Feb 23, 2012, 03:49 AM
Number of posts: 6,336

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Bill signed in Kansas will allow concealed carry with no permit!!!

A bill signed Thursday by Gov. Sam Brownback will allow residents in Kansas to carry concealed firearms without a permit or training.

Kansans aged 21 or older will be permitted to carry concealed guns starting July 1 when the law takes effect, even if they’re not trained or don’t have a permit, the Kansas City Star reports. That will make the state one of six to allow “constitutional carry.”

Anyone who would like to carry a concealed gun in any of the three dozen states that accept Kansas permits must go through training, a requirement that Brownback emphasized. But even with regard to Kansans, who won’t be required to go through training, he acknowledged that his youngest son had “got a lot out of” a hunter safety course recently and urged others “to take advantage of that.”

“We’re saying that if you want to do that in this state, then you don’t have to get the permission slip from the government,” Brownback said. “It is a constitutional right, and we’re removing a barrier to that right.”

The Kansas State Rifle Association was supportive of the bill. A statement on its website reads: “the right to keep and bear arms is a natural, unalienable right protected by the Second Amendment and citizens should not have to go through burdensome and expensive hoops to exercise that right.”

http://time.com/3770182/kansas-bill-constitutional-carry-concealed-guns/




What possibly could go wrong?????

This Red State Almost Expanded Health Insurance to 280,000 Poor People

http://www.alternet.org/red-state-almost-expanded-health-insurance-280000-poor-people-then-koch-group-got-involved

This Red State Almost Expanded Health Insurance to 280,000 Poor People -- Then Koch Group Got Involved
The health care plan was killed, revived last week, and killed again.
By Tana Ganeva / AlterNet
April 1, 2015


Tracy Foster calmly explains that when she goes to doctors, all they can do is "poke" -- she makes a poking motion with her hand -- her bladder back into place, because it is falling out of her body. She has bladder cancer. She needs to have surgery immediately, the doctors all agree, but she doesn't have insurance and can't get the operation unless she hands over eight thousand dollars up front (two thousand for the doctor, six thousand for the hospital). She doesn't have that kind of money or a health plan to cover it.

Foster had one surgery for her cancer when she was covered by TennCare, Tennessee's version of Medicaid, state-run health care for the poor. But she was dropped, she says, because her daughter turned 18 and as an adult with no dependent children she's no longer eligible for coverage. She's spent most of her life working in the health industry, tending to Alzheimer's patients in nursing homes, working in a hospital lab, administering EKGs. So she has no illusions about her situation. "They found the lymph nodes near my bladder enlarged," she sighs.

<snip>

It should not be surprising that anti-government conservatives backed by the Koch brothers gave torpedoing the plan their all. The day of the Moral Monday protest, Tennessee's chapter of Americans for Prosperity, the conservative advocacy group (David Koch heads AFP's Foundation), had relaunched its radio campaign against Insure Tennessee.

AFP-Tenn has relentlessly hammered the proposal's parallels to Medicaid expansion under Obamacare, making things exceedingly awkward for its Republican backers. "Obamacare has been a disaster. Expanding Obamacare in Tennessee will be the same," the latest ad said.

<snip>

Here's a link to the Gofundme campaign raising money for Tracy Foster's operation: http://www.gofundme.com/dvq5cs


Tana Ganeva is AlterNet's managing editor. Follow her on Twitter or email her at tana@alternet.org.




I feel such sadness and I am typing through tears of rage and compassion all at once. I have bladder cancer. If I hadn't enlisted in the Navy at 21 just so my dad would have to listen to my antiwar opinion at the Thanksgiving table in '72 I could very well be in this boat with Tracy Foster. I am being treated very well by the VA for my cancer. I will get a third surgery in a couple of weeks. And I will send a donation to Tracy as soon as I send this. Read the rest oft he article. It will make you shake in anger.

Herb Morehead aka Marble Falls.
Posted by marble falls | Thu Apr 2, 2015, 09:49 AM (3 replies)

Florida Tribe Threatens Rick Scott: Let Us Build A Casino Or We Start Growing Pot


Florida Tribe Threatens Rick Scott: Let Us Build A Casino Or We Start Growing Pot
If the state rejects the deal, the tribe is within its rights to sue to use the land to grow marijuana
By Scott Kaufman / Raw Story
February 21, 2015

http://www.alternet.org/florida-tribe-threatens-rick-scott-let-us-build-casino-or-we-start-growing-pot

<snip>

An Alabama native American tribe that operates casinos in Florida informed the state that if it doesn’t allow them to expand their casinos, they will have no choice but to start growing marijuana on the land designated for the expansion, the Associated Press reports.

The Poarch Creek Band of native Americans told Florida Governor Rick Scott that if the state’s Republican-controlled House and Senate refused to allow the tribe to operate a casino on land it owns in Escambia County, it would endeavor to grow and distribute marijuana on the land in accordance with the regulations that the federal government has imposed on states that have legalized the trade.

<snip>

If the state rejects the deal, the tribe is within its rights to sue to use the land to grow marijuana, as this past December the Department of Justice stated that tribes can grow and distribute marijuana on their sovereign land — even if the state in which that land is situated has not legalized marijuana.

Many tribes have resisted selling marijuana because, as the director of the Drug Policy Institute at the University of Florida, Kevin Sabet, told the Los Angeles Times, “native Americans and their families suffer disproportionately from addiction compared to other groups. The last thing they want is another commercialized industry that targets them for greater use.”

How Many Ways Can the City of Ferguson Slap You With Court Fees?

http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2014/09/ferguson-might-have-break-its-habit-hitting-poor-people-big-fines
How Many Ways Can the City of Ferguson Slap You With Court Fees? We Counted
Ferguson city officials pledge to cut back on revenue-boosting court fees and fines—and there are plenty to choose from.

—By Julia Lurie and Katie Rose Quandt
| Fri Sep. 12, 2014 5:30 AM EDT


Over 100 people showed up on Tuesday night at the first Ferguson City Council meeting since Michael Brown's killing, and unreasonable court fees were a major complaint. Ferguson officials proposed scaling back the myriad ways small-time offenders can end up paying big bucks—or worse. Community activists are optimistic about the proposed changes, but as it turns out, imposing punitive court fines on poor residents is a major source of income for a number of St. Louis County municipalities.

How bad is the current system? Say you're a low-income Ferguson resident who's been hit with a municipal fine for rolling through a stop sign, driving without insurance, or neglecting to subscribe to the city's trash collection service. A look at the municipal codes in Ferguson and nearby towns reveals how these fines and fees can quickly stack up.

To start, you might show up on time for your court date, only to find that your hearing is already over. How is that possible? According to a Ferguson court employee who spoke with St. Louis-based legal aid watchdog ArchCity Defenders, the bench routinely starts hearing cases 30 minutes before the appointed time and even locks the doors as early as five minutes after the official hour, hitting defendants who arrive just slightly late with an additional charge of $120-130.

Or you may arrive to find yourself faced with an impossible choice: Skip your court date or leave your children unattended in the parking lot. Non-defendants, such as children, are permitted by law to accompany defendants in the courtroom, but a survey by the presiding judge of the St. Louis County Circuit Court found that 37 percent of local courts don't allow it.

Coming to court has its own pitfalls, but not the ones many people fear. It's a common misconception among Ferguson residents—especially those without attorneys—that if you show up without money to pay your fine, you'll go to jail. In fact, you can't be put behind bars for inability to pay a fine, but you can be sent to jail for failure to appear in court (and accrue a $125 fee). If you miss your court date, the court will likely issue a warrant for your arrest, which comes with a fee of its own:

At this point, you owe your initial fine, plus fines for failure to appear in court and the arrest warrant. Thomas Harvey, executive director of ArchCity Defenders, explains that if you're arrested, your bail will likely equal the sum of these fines. Ferguson Municipal Court is only in session three days a month, so if you can't meet bail, you might sit in jail for days until the next court session—which, you guessed it, will cost you.

Once you finally appear in court and receive your verdict, your IOU is likely to go up again.

Can't pay all at once? No problem! Opt for a payment plan, and come to court once a month with an installment. But if you miss a date, expect another $125 "failure to appear" fine, plus another warrant for your arrest.

Court fines for minor infractions tend to snowball. For example, drivers accumulate points for speeding, rolling through stop signs, or driving without insurance. You can pay to wipe your record, which is pricey. If you can't afford to, and rack up enough points, your license will be suspended and your insurance costs will probably jump. Need to get to work? If you're caught driving with a suspended license, your court fines increase, you gain more points, and your suspension is lengthened. That's how rolling through a stop sign could end up costing you your job, messing up your degree plans, and more.

In a county like St. Louis, which consists of 81 different municipal court systems, it's easy to end up with fines and outstanding warrants in multiple towns. Harvey has seen his clients bounce from jail to jail, and says there's even a local name for this: the "muni-shuffle."

"Every handful of months, there’s some awful thing that happens as a result of someone being arrested on multiple warrants," says Harvey. Last year, a 24-year-old man in Jennings, another city in St. Louis County, hung himself after he couldn't get out of jail for outstanding traffic warrants. "They can't get out, and they know they’re not going to get out," says Harvey. In Ferguson, he explains, residents are caught in cycles of debt that stem from three main infractions: driving without insurance, driving with a suspended license, and driving without registration.

So what happens to all that cash? In Ferguson, as in thousands of municipalities across the country, it goes toward paying city officials, funding city services, and otherwise keeping the wheels of local government turning. In fact, fines and court fees are the city's second-largest revenue source. Last year, Ferguson issued 3 warrants for every household—25,000 warrants in a city of 21,000 people.

"Ferguson isn't an outlier," says Alexes Harris, sociology professor at University of Washington and author of the upcoming book Pound of Flesh: Monetary Sanctions as Permanent Punishment for Poor People​. Similar measures play out in jurisdictions across the country. "All you have to do is show up in court and watch what happens."

The good news is that this week, under pressure from local activists, the Ferguson City Council announced plans to eliminate some of the most punitive fees, including the $125 failure to appear fee and the $50 fee to cancel a warrant. Of course, nothing is set to change elsewhere in St. Louis County. But eliminating some of the most egregious fees in one town, says Harvey, is "huge progress."

Front page image: Jeff Roberson/AP

Video shows Stockton teacher dragging student





A Northern California P.E. teacher is charged with abusing a child after trying to force her into a swimming pool during class. The struggle was captured on camera by another student. The incident happened at Edison High in Stockton during P.E. class at the schools pool.

The video shows the teacher, Denny Peterson, trying to drag a 14-year-old girl into the pool back in August.

The teen reportedly did not want to participate get in the pool because she just had her hair done that morning for an evening event.

Peterson was put on paid leave for a month, but then assigned to another Stockton school. He was charged with misdemeanor corporal injury to a child.

The family says they plan to file a lawsuit.
Map My News

http://abc7news.com/education/video-shows-stockton-teacher-dragging-student--/405182/

Photo of Snow Storm Running Into Buffalo:



http://sploid.gizmodo.com/holy-mother-of-god-check-out-this-giant-wall-of-snow-s-1660338942
http://sploid.gizmodo.com/impressive-time-lapse-of-the-snow-wall-that-swallowed-b-1660571801

http://i.kinja-img.com/gawker-media/image/upload/s--385ozZj8--/c_fit,fl_progressive,q_80,w_636/fxpfkr90owfokabdlf0a.jpg

Ferguson officer accused of raping pregnant woman:

‘You’re the type of girl that can get me in trouble’
Arturo Garcia

17 Nov 2014 at 17:35 ET
<snip>

The federal lawsuit against Jaris Hayden accuses him of ordering the woman into the boiler room of the city jail in October 2013 and ordering her to provide oral sex before forcing himself upon her. Hayden allegedly assaulted the woman even though her boyfriend had posted her bond, telling her, “You’re the type of girl that can get me in trouble” as he released her from her cell. According to the lawsuit, DNA analysis confirmed that pubic hair the woman obtained during the attack belonged to Hayden.

“Law enforcement Officers of the City of Ferguson have been involved in many other acts of violence including the shooting of Michael Brown on Aug. 9, 2014,” the suit states. “On information and belief discovery will produce other acts of violence, all contributing to a pattern and practice of allowing violence and sexual assault on members of the public. The numerous acts of violence against the citizenry by law enforcement of the City of Ferguson constitute a pattern.”

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported that Hayden was charged on Nov. 5 with two counts of having sexual contact with a prisoner, one count of permitting escape and one count of acceding to corruption by a public servant.

<snip>

The attack allegedly took place after the woman, identified in the suit as “J.W.,” was arrested by another officer for having an expired license plate and accused of providing a fake name. The lawsuit states that the woman was wearing nursing smocks from her job when Hayden told her, “You smell good” and, “This will teach you a lesson” while booking her into jail.

At one point during her incarceration, J.W. reportedly suffered pain and “discharges.” Hayden contacted EMTs, who left it up to him whether to release her to them for medical care.

“Hayden did not indicate a decision in J.W.’s presence,” the suit states. “Hayden and the EMT’s left the room. J.W. never saw the EMT’s again.”

<snip>

The lawsuit, as posted online by the Post, can be read at link:

http://www.rawstory.com/rs/?s=Ferguson+officer+accused+of+raping+pregnant+woman%3A

‘He’s blind, dumb*ss’: Cops ditch disabled man in vacant lot to protest videotaping of pot bust Trav

‘He’s blind, dumb*ss’: Cops ditch disabled man in vacant lot to protest videotaping of pot bust
Travis Gettys

http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2014/11/hes-blind-dumbss-cops-ditch-disabled-man-in-vacant-lot-to-protest-videotaping-of-pot-bust/



14 Nov 2014 at 07:20 ET

A visually impaired Florida man said police took him to an unfamiliar area and left him there in retaliation after his stepfather recorded cell phone video of a pot bust.

Four plainclothes officers from the Miami-Dade Police department pulled into a dead end street the evening of Aug. 27 and arrested three men they believed had been smoking marijuana, reported WFOR-TV.

The arrest report shows officers found a marijuana cigarette on the ground they approached the men.

Officers arrested all three of them as a fourth man recorded the incident on his cell phone.

They released two of the men after they signed tickets promising to appear in court, but the third man – Tannie “T-Man” Burke – was handcuffed and led to the back of an unmarked car, where he had trouble finding the door.

“He’s blind, dumb*ass,” says the man videotaping the arrest. “If you don’t tell him he’s walking to the car, how the hell is he going to know?”

The 21-year-old Burke has been legally blind since birth, the station reported, with no vision at all in his right eye and just a general sense of shapes and lights in his left eye.

He said he’s comfortable getting around his block in the daytime but does not venture far at night.

Burke said officers drove him around the neighborhood for about 20 minutes before dropping him off after dark in a vacant lot in South Dade – about a mile from his home.

Burke told the station that police complained throughout the drive about his stepfather.

“They said, ‘Your stepfather got a lot of mouth — you know we don’t like that,’” he said.

He said he told officers he was blind, but they didn’t seem to care and dropped him off in an area without streetlights or houses after making him sign an arrest form he couldn’t read.

Police had taken his cell phone, so Burke said he started walking home with one foot in the road and the other on the weed-choked curb strip to keep him from straying into traffic.

Eventually, he found a street that was lit and a stranger agreed to help him get home.

“Forty-five minutes to an hour later he comes walking through the door all sweaty up,” said his stepfather, Marvin Armstrong. “I was like, ‘How’d you get out?’”

Burke and his family filed a complaint with the police department, which handed the case over to its internal affairs unit.

Burke told the station he’s never been convicted of a crime, but he has been arrested twice and detained at least a dozen other times.

“I feel they stop me because they see a black man walking down the street,” he said. “I don’t know what to say about it. I just feel bad about it, that’s it.”

I am shocked, and sorry for my misconceptions:

For various reasons I've been exposed to a lot of misogyny on DU the last couple of days. What I thought was over reaction by feminists on this site was well founded and if anything under reacted to. I am ashamed of a lot of men who post here. I am sickened by their "humor" over rape particularly. I do know this: if I come across it (and I will because I am looking out for it now) I will fight it and report it and vote to hide if I get called for any jury about it. I have had zero tolerance for racism and now it is zero tolerance for any sort of sexism. No more rolling my eyes, I am fighting against it.

Murder trial for ex-Phoenix officer begins

Murder trial for ex-Phoenix officer begins
By JACQUES BILLEAUD
Aug. 5, 2013 3:11 PM EDT



An undated Phoenix Police Dept. booking mug shot shows former Phoenix Police Officer Richard Chrisman

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/murder-trial-ex-phoenix-officer-set-begin

PHOENIX (AP) — Jury selection began Monday for a former Phoenix police officer charged with murder and animal cruelty in the fatal shootings of an unarmed man and his dog during a domestic dispute call.

Authorities say then-Officer Richard Chrisman broke the law in his response to the 2010 call that ended with the death of 29-year-old Daniel Rodriguez at the south Phoenix trailer that Rodriguez shared with his mother. Chrisman disputes that he acted improperly, saying the shooting was justified because Rodriguez had reached for the officer's gun during a tussle that preceded the shooting.

Attorneys are expected to make opening arguments Wednesday.

Rodriguez's mother had called police from a neighbor's trailer because she said her son had damaged property inside their trailer after the two had gotten into an argument on Oct. 5, 2010.

Investigators say that when Rodriguez questioned the officers' right to be inside the trailer, Chrisman drew his pistol, put its muzzle on Rodriguez's temple and said he didn't need a warrant to be there. Chrisman's partner told investigators that there was no threat being made against either officer. Chrisman denies that he put his gun to Rodriguez's temple.

Authorities say Chrisman put his gun back in its holster and tried to grab Rodriguez, leading to a struggle in which both officers tried unsuccessfully to restrain Rodriguez and used their stun guns on Rodriguez, who at one point removed the Taser probes that were on his chest.

Investigators also say Chrisman shot pepper spray into Rodriguez's eyes and drew his pistol a second time and shot Rodriguez's barking dog. Chrisman's partner told investigators that the dog wasn't attacking either officer.

Another scuffle between Chrisman and Rodriguez began when Rodriguez said he wanted to leave on his bicycle. At some point, Chrisman drew his pistol again and shot Rodriguez in the chest from about two to three feet away. Rodriguez fell to the ground and was later pronounced dead at the scene, authorities said.

The case, to a large degree, boils down to conflicting accounts from Chrisman and his partner, Officer Sergio Virgillo — the only two people, besides Rodriguez, inside the trailer to witness the escalating confrontation.

Virgillo told investigators that he never saw a weapon in Rodriguez's hands and that there was no threat that required deadly force. Chrisman's attorney has said Virgillo had exhausted all options for controlling Rodriguez before he fired the shots and that Virgillo abandoned Chrisman and walked out of the trailer.

Maricopa County Attorney Bill Montgomery, whose office is prosecuting the case, declined to say whether there was other evidence beyond the two officers' accounts to back up their contention that Chrisman committed a crime.

Chrisman had pleaded not guilty to second degree murder, aggravated assault and animal cruelty charges. The nine-year veteran of the Phoenix Police Department was fired about five months after Rodriguez's death.

Defense attorneys had complained earlier in the case that an account of the shooting that was filed into court records didn't contain any information to their client.

"We look forward to having the trial start and having a chance to tell our side of the story," said Chrisman's attorney, Craig Mehrens.

___

Associated Press writer Brian Skoloff contributed to this report.
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