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Member since: Fri Dec 10, 2010, 10:36 PM
Number of posts: 53,592

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Thanks, I hadn't heard that one... This is the one I remember best:

Time Has Come Today ~ Chambers Brothers

Time has come today
Young hearts can go their way
Can't put it off another day
I don't care what others say
They say we don't listen anyway
Time has come today

The rules have changed today (Hey)
I have no place to stay (Hey)
I'm thinking about the subway (Hey)
My love has flown away (Hey)
My tears have come and gone (Hey)
Oh my Lord, I have to roam (Hey)
I have no home (Hey)
I have no home (Hey)

Now the time has come (Time)
There's no place to run (Time)
I might get burned up by the sun (Time)
But I had my fun (Time)
I've been loved and put aside (Time)
I've been crushed by the tumbling tide (Time)
And my soul has been psychedelicized (Time)

Now the time has come (Time)
There are things to realize (Time)
Time has come today (Time)
Time has come today (Time)


Now the time has come (Time)
There's no place to run (Time)
I might get burned up by the sun (Time)
But I had my fun (Time)
I've been loved and put aside (Time)
I've been crushed by tumbling tide (Time)
And my soul has been psychedelicized (Time)

Now the time has come (Time)
There are things to realize (Time)
Time has come today (Time)
Time has come today (Time)


Once again, the time has come today to end the oppression of people for 400 years who are 'tired of being shot at.'

Texas had an unhealthy fascination with the CSA when I was growing up:

Jefferson Davis High School in Houston.

'Spirit of the Confederacy' in Sam Houston Park in downtown Houston.

Check the chapter list of the:

Texas Division

United Daughters of the Confederacy®


There was a state holiday for the birthday of that Jefferrson-fucking-Davis! In 1973 it was mixed with Robert E. Lee's to create 'Confederate Heroes Day.'

The Confederate response to the Emancipation Proclaimation. Jefferson Davis' own words:

"...Now, therefore, as a compensatory measure, I do hereby issue the following Address to the People of the Non-Slaveholding States:

On and after February 22, 1863, all free negroes within the limits of the Southern Confederacy shall be placed on the slave status, and be deemed to be chattels, they and their issue forever.

All negroes who shall be taken in any of the States in which slavery does not now exist, in the progress of our arms, shall be adjudged, immediately after such capture, to occupy the slave status, and in all States which shall be vanquished by our arms, all free negroes shall, ipsofacto, be reduced to the condition of helotism, so that the respective normal conditions of the white and black races may be ultimately placed on a permanent basis, so as to prevent the public peace from being thereafter endangered..."


It's American Exceptionalism. We control everything, everywhere! No evil happens without us!

We are omnipotent, all powerful, all seeing, all knowing! Muahahaha!

Okay, back away from Paranoid Plaza.

DU is like The Taming of the Shrew, Act IV, Scene 5:


* Petruchio. Come on, a God's name; once more toward our father's.
Good Lord, how bright and goodly shines the moon!

* Katherina. The moon? The sun! It is not moonlight now.

* Petruchio. I say it is the moon that shines so bright.

* Katherina. I know it is the sun that shines so bright.

* Petruchio. Now by my mother's son, and that's myself,
It shall be moon, or star, or what I list,
Or ere I journey to your father's house.

Go on and fetch our horses back again.
Evermore cross'd and cross'd; nothing but cross'd!

* Hortensio. Say as he says, or we shall never go.

* Katherina. Forward, I pray, since we have come so far,
And be it moon, or sun, or what you please;
And if you please to call it a rush-candle,
Henceforth I vow it shall be so for me.

* Petruchio. I say it is the moon.

* Katherina. I know it is the moon.

* Petruchio. Nay, then you lie; it is the blessed sun.

* Katherina. Then, God be bless'd, it is the blessed sun;
But sun it is not, when you say it is not;
And the moon changes even as your mind.
What you will have it nam'd, even that it is,
And so it shall be so for Katherine.

* Hortensio. Petruchio, go thy ways, the field is won.

* Petruchio. Well, forward, forward! thus the bowl should run,
And not unluckily against the bias.
But, soft! Company is coming here.

Good-morrow, gentle mistress; where away?
Tell me, sweet Kate, and tell me truly too,
Hast thou beheld a fresher gentlewoman?
Such war of white and red within her cheeks!
What stars do spangle heaven with such beauty
As those two eyes become that heavenly face?
Fair lovely maid, once more good day to thee.
Sweet Kate, embrace her for her beauty's sake.

* Hortensio. 'A will make the man mad, to make a woman of him.

* Katherina. Young budding virgin, fair and fresh and sweet,
Whither away, or where is thy abode?
Happy the parents of so fair a child;
Happier the man whom favourable stars
Allots thee for his lovely bed-fellow.

* Petruchio. Why, how now, Kate, I hope thou art not mad!
This is a man, old, wrinkled, faded, withered,
And not a maiden, as thou sayst he is.

* Katherina. Pardon, old father, my mistaking eyes,
That have been so bedazzled with the... sun?
That everything I look on seemeth green;
Now I perceive thou art a reverend father.
Pardon, I pray thee, for my mad mistaking.

* Petruchio. Do, good old grandsire, and withal make known
Which way thou travellest- if along with us,
We shall be joyful of thy company.

* Vincentio. Fair sir, and you my merry mistress,
That with your strange encounter much amaz'd me,
My name is call'd Vincentio, my dwelling Pisa,
And bound I am to Padua, there to visit
A son of mine, which long I have not seen.

* Petruchio. What is his name?

* Vincentio. Lucentio, gentle sir.

* Petruchio. Happily met; the happier for thy son.
And now by law, as well as reverend age,
I may entitle thee my loving father:
The sister to my wife, this gentlewoman,
Thy son by this hath married. Wonder not,
Nor be not grieved- she is of good esteem,
Her dowry wealthy, and of worthy birth;
Beside, so qualified as may beseem
The spouse of any noble gentleman.
Let me embrace with old Vincentio;
And wander we to see thy honest son,
Who will of thy arrival be full joyous.

* Vincentio. But is this true; or is it else your pleasure,
Like pleasant travellers, to break a jest
Upon the company you overtake?

* Hortensio. I do assure thee, father, so it is.

* Petruchio. Come, go along, and see the truth hereof;
For our first merriment hath made thee jealous.

Exeunt all but HORTENSIO

* Hortensio. Well, Petruchio, this has put me in heart.
Have to my widow; and if she be froward,
Then hast thou taught Hortensio to be untoward.


We're being trained. We have to ask:'Mother, May I?' before we post anything.

These lines I find particularly striking:

You may write me down in history

With your bitter, twisted lies,

You may tread me in the very dirt

But still, like dust, I'll rise.

And then there's this:

There is a world of difference between being a woman and being an old female...

But to become a woman is a serious matter. A woman takes responsibility for the time she takes up and the space she occupies.

That last part is how we should live:

A woman takes responsibility for the time she takes up and the space she occupies.

That first part is like the poem IF:

If - By Rudyard Kipling

If you can keep your head when all about you
Are losing theirs and blaming it on you,
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
But make allowance for their doubting too;
If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
Or being lied about, don’t deal in lies,
Or being hated, don’t give way to hating,
And yet don’t look too good, nor talk too wise:

If you can dream - and not make dreams your master;
If you can think - and not make thoughts your aim;
If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
And treat those two impostors just the same;
If you can bear to hear the truth you’ve spoken
Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,
And stoop and build ’em up with worn-out tools:

If you can make one heap of all your winnings
And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
And lose, and start again at your beginnings
And never breathe a word about your loss;
If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
To serve your turn long after they are gone,
And so hold on when there is nothing in you
Except the Will which says to them: ‘Hold on!’

If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
Or walk with Kings - nor lose the common touch,
If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,
If all men count with you, but none too much;
If you can fill the unforgiving minute
With sixty seconds’ worth of distance run,
Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it,
And - which is more - you’ll be a Man, my son!

Or a Woman, in this case. This as much the example of Hillary, Obama and Bernie to us all. Thanks to you and Sunshine.

You know, we can't get no...

My super-liberal anti-war congressman endorsed her, so it's TEOTWAWKI.

And as Marissa said, gentification is driving black residents from the only area they were allowed

to live, for the wealthy. The history of social connections in that article still exist and their descendents are what may be described as the 'rentier class.'

While some of the wealthy got that way by endeavors, it was built on the theft of land from the Duwamish, as people here know, and on the backs of laboring POC. Many working class non-whites did not benefit as may be assumed either, but there is a divide in some areas. But Seattle is changing rapidly.

The current icon for King County is MLK, Jr., but it was named for a slave holder, William R. King. Seattle is in King County.

The Washington State Flag Sucks

'If you’ll notice, it’s poorly designed and has a slave-owner on it', George Washingtom. For many people thinking of George gives them a nice feeling. But not for all.

By Kelton Sears -Aug 26 2014

King was an especially vocal advocate for the Fugitive Slave Act, which set aggressive legal mandates for the return of slaves who managed to escape plantations and find their way to the free states.

One hundred and fifty-five years after naming itself after this guy, King County officially acknowledged that William Rufus DeVane King, despite how cool he may have seemed in 1852, really loved that vile Fugitive Slave Act a lot. Also, he and his family collectively owned, like, 500 goddamn slaves.

King County, it realized, was named after an asshole.

In 2005, a 19-year effort led by City Councilmember Bruce Laing and County Executive Ron Sims culminated in then-Governor Christine Gregoire’s signing of a bill effectively changing the county’s namesake from racist asshole King to civil-rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. When the movement finally succeeded, Sims wrote, “This is a profound and meaningful change that sends a strong and positive message about the values of our government and the people we serve.” Two years later, the county officially changed its logo from a king’s crown to a silhouette of Dr. King.



An unbroken chain exists that leads to protests.

I suggest one like this:

He's campaigning for her so maybe he'll let her hitch a ride in the tour bus.

Oh, wait. She'll be inside the bus, not under it. Okay, you find the bus.

The untold story of Seattle’s racist mayor *AA Group*

Knute Berger - 2015.08.12

Portrait of frontier journalist and Seattle mayor Beriah Brown and his wife Jeanie taken at E. F. Dollarhide’s Seattle studio in the 1870s. Credit: Brown Family Papers Collection, University oF Washington, Neg # 36689

The legacy of the Civil War is in the news. The debate over the Confederate flag in South Carolina brought up reminders that the rebel banner flies along I-5 in Washington in a private park dedicated to Jefferson Davis. A Confederate veteran’s memorial on Capitol Hill has been vandalized and a local group is calling for its removal. One hundred and fifty years after the war’s end, we are learning that our region was not untouched by the conflict or its politics, and that issues of race are still unresolved and infuse our present-day politics.

In that context, meet Beriah Brown, one of Seattle’s most important pioneer citizens. When he came to the young city, he brought the first power press and in 1871 founded Seattle’s first real daily newspaper, the Puget Sound Dispatch, which later merged with a competitor to form an entity that became the Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Brown also served as president of the budding territorial University of Washington’s board of regents in the mid 1870s, and was clerk to the U.S. District court here. He was active in politics, too, and in 1878 he was elected to a single term as Seattle’s mayor.

But Beriah Brown was no ordinary frontier newsman. He came to Seattle as a refugee of Civil War and antebellum politics who sought to reinvent himself in fresh country. At one point, Brown fled to the Pacific Northwest from San Francisco to save his neck from an angry lynch mob.

That’s because Brown’s politics were not unlike those of Confederate President Jefferson Davis himself: He believed in white supremacy, defended slavery, wrote harshly about the “malignant” Abraham Lincoln. He was accused of Southern sympathies and suspected of heading a secret society dedicated to extending slavery throughout the Western Hemisphere, including the West Coast...

Much more of this part of a series of Crosscut stories discussing race in the Puget Sound region:


Now we see why Marissa talked the way she did. Van Jones has also come out in support of her and of BLM Seattle.

*Please read the SOP in 'About this group' and the pinned threads in the AA Group's index page. This is for the regular members of AA. This is not GD.*

They should've asked me. I knew that:

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