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NYC_SKP

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Name: N/A
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Hometown: The Golden State
Home country: www.democraticunderground.com/?com=view_post&f
Current location: http://www.democraticunderground.com/?com=view_post&forum=1243&pid=30906
Member since: Thu May 29, 2008, 11:43 PM
Number of posts: 64,669

About Me

http://www.democraticunderground.com/12593371#post1 [div class=excerpt]http://www.democraticunderground.com/124384291 http://www.democraticunderground.com/124384554 1. It need not be unanimous. But there must be the consensus. I tend to think that if one person is strongly opposed to a lock, and is making that stand based on some principle they are able to articulate, then that position should be respected and consensus does not exist. But if some people are just-kinda-meh-not-sure opposed to a lock, then you can assume that consensus exists. But I think the bigger picture is that if everyone is doing the job in good faith and being polite to each other, then it should not be very hard to determine if consensus exists and act accordingly. http://www.democraticunderground.com/12595617 [/div] ~~~~~~ Hi Jerry!!! :thumbsup:[font color=blue][b][link:http://www.democraticunderground.com/?com=forum&id=1269|Visit the new DU \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\"Progressive Media Resources Group\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\"][/font size][/font color][/b]:thumbsup: http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/dam/assets/121223012937-11-obama-face-1223-horizontal-gallery.jpg :thumbsup:[font color = blue][b][link:http://www.democraticunderground.com/?com=forum&id=1269|Visit the new DU \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\"Progressive Media Resources Group\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\"][/font size][/font color][/b]:thumbsup: http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/dam/assets/121223012937-11-obama-face-1223-horizontal-gallery.jpg

Journal Archives

No, in some peoples' worlds they don't. Sucks to be them.

There are mysteries and there are wonders, for atheists and believers and scientists and scholars, and these sometimes have "scientific" explanations.

But these explanations often are developed to satisfy some urgent need to "explain", as if the unexplainable is uncomfortable for them.

So, they pour hours and hours writing treatises about how observable evidence exists to explain every phenomenon that can be named.

Now am I talking about science, or could it be something else?

What is it with people that everything needs an explanation?

"Religious fundamentalism... ...eliminates God himself, turning him into a mere ideological pretext

I've come to that same conclusion. These events, this fundamentalism, under careful scrutiny, are cases of evildoers appropriating religion to serve as cover for their despicable agenda.

As such, it's not the fault of that religion.

In fact, the religion is a victim of the misappropriation.

Peace.


Francis said the Paris attacks were the result of a "throwaway culture" in which human beings and even God are rejected outright. Referring to the "tragic slayings" in Paris, Francis said those responsible had become "enslaved" by new fads and "deviant forms of religion."

"Religious fundamentalism, even before it eliminates human beings by perpetrating horrendous killings, eliminates God himself, turning him into a mere ideological pretext," he said.

Francis also denounced the "abominable" kidnapping and enslavement of young girls by Boko Haram militants in Nigeria and the slaughter of "unspeakable brutality" of more than 100 children by the Taliban in Pakistan.

Deeper than that, they were all puppets, unwitting tools, Hebdo and the shooters.

The most acceptable, comprehensible storyline, brave journalists killed by religion crazed extremist, belies the truths of the matter.

This wasn't about being insulted and then reacting with violence.

The killers were doing the bidding of powers not representative of Islam, and the journalists were unwitting victims in a global war of ideology and politics, with religion a side note, though elevated to a perceived central role by the media and a gullible public.

The killers and the killed were all puppets, really, and in that sense they were victims in a brutal global pissing match.

The evil folks in all of this remain nameless with the exception of those shown in the photograph below, who have found a way to exploit this tragedy.

Funny how that happens.

I would submit that it's respect for cockroaches and vermin that especially mark the buddhist POV.

It's easy to love a cute puppy, or to feel bad for a bear.

For Westerners, and others, there's a cultural subset of species that are dishonored for various reasons: flies, roaches, snakes, and spiders for example.

Indeed, many carry diseases and others are just pests, but all are critters with lives.

It's a bit like people, actually.

We want to try to love each and everyone, and especially those who are annoying and even dangerous.

They need love the most.

Read what Juan Cole said about that, about motive for attacking the satirists:


Juan Cole has some insightful words on the Charlie Hebdo attack in Paris.

As he points out, the shooters were neither "attacking free speech" nor "defending Mohammed"; they were using a time-honored tactic of radical extremists (of all stripes): "sharpening the contradictions," hoping to provoke an overreaction that would lead to repression and persecution of Muslims in general -- thus helping the extremists recruit new members.

This is what bin Laden did with such spectacular success with 9/11: provoking an endless global war, with Western "interventions" and "targeted assassinations" and drone strikes that have killed hundreds of thousands of innocent people -- all of which, as our own security services tell us, have fed the flames of extremism and made the situation worse.

http://www.juancole.com/2015/01/sharpening-contradictions-satirists.html

Joe Sacco. That needs to be an Original Post, KittyWampus. Thank you.

In fact when we draw a line, we are often crossing one too. Because lines on paper are a weapon, and satire is meant to cut to the bone. But whose bone? What exactly is the target?

And why?

~snip~

And what is it about Muslims in this time and place that makes them unable to laugh off a mere image. And if we answer, "Because something is deeply wrong with them" -certainly something that was deeply wrong with the killers- then let us drive them from their homes and into the sea...

For that is going to be far easier than sorting out how we fit in each other's world.

http://yournz.org/2015/01/10/satirical-cartoons-where-should-the-line-be-drawn/


Wow!

Can we please do the hard work of sorting out how we fit in each other's world and stop with the childish attacks?



Excellent. Bookmarking!

Thank you!

The ownership numbers are suspect. People unlikely to self-report ownership, distrustful of Gov.

But even if they are true, correlation is not causation. Also, I suspect the MOE weakens any conclusions drawn from the "General Social Survey".

Finally, other studies show conflicting data (OMG this is so easy to refute your sorry data):

Looks pretty steady for the past 18 years:



















There's more where these came from: http://www.gallup.com/poll/1645/Guns.aspx





Good post. Every day is Thanksgiving Day!

It's a great chance to practice the Eastern philosophy that is the foundation of the Japanese Tea Ceremony: "Ichi-go ichi-e":

Ichi-go ichi-e: This is the moment
Each moment is unique, the sights and sounds and especially people surrounding you, savor these!

But it's not only about the specialness of each moment in the moment, but that every moment is eternal, too:

Ichi-go ichi-e: Forever but never again
Every moment is at once fleeting and permanent in our hearts and souls.

http://www.presentationzen.com/presentationzen/2008/07/ichi-go-ichi-e-this-is-the-moment.html


Ichi-go ichi-e, my friends!



Thank you for posting!!!

See what I did there?



Quite and interesting and timely topic!

It seems that in our culture, or maybe it's part of the human condition, we often need to be deliberate in showing gratitude.

We have set aside one day a year to formalize this, after which one might think we can go back to the daily business of making ends meet, not getting hit by a bus, and all the rest.

Other cultures have more regular and periodic practices and traditions. Saying grace before a meal can, for example, also be used to recognize and honor that one has food to eat and is with loved ones.

Once a day or thrice a day, that beats once every Autumn!

My favorite cultural acknowledgment of the special quality of every moment is the Japanese Tea Ceremony, more specifically, "the Ichi-go ichi-e":

Ichi-go ichi-e: this is the moment

Tea Following up on Benjamin Zander's inspirational teachings on the art of possibility (and performance), allow me to share a simple idea from the art of tea or Sadou, "the way of tea." You may think that the traditional art of Sadou (茶道 is a strange place to glean lessons that can be applied to various aspects of our daily lives, but the simple practical lessons from the Zen arts run deep and wide. Ichi-go ichi-e (一期一会 is a concept connected to the way of tea; it expresses the ideal of the way of tea. Roughly translated the phrase means "one time, one meeting" or "one encounter; one opportunity." In the way of tea we should respect the host and the others in the garden and the tea room and honor the moment as if it were a once-in-a-lifetime gathering. That is, we should cherish every meeting for it will never happen again. Ichi-go ichi-e is a reminder that each tea ceremony is unique even though the elements are familiar.


But it's not only about the specialness of each moment in the moment, but that every moment is eternal, too:

Application for presentation
Each occasion to present or speak publicly is also a unique event although your material may be so familiar that it feels routine. Being completely present in a presentation right here right now is something I always touch upon when discussing the delivery of a talk. The moment will never happen again, even if you do the same talk 100 times or more, the audience is different in each case. The audience is different, the time is different, and since your last talk, you are different.

Forever but never again
This idea of ichi-go ichi-e reminded me of a line from a famous jazz ballad from 1949 called "Again" (Mark Murphy's Stolen Moments version is my favorite; here are the lyrics). There is nothing "Zen" about the lyrics or their origins, of course, but there is one line from the song that has stayed with me since I bought the Mark Murphy album when I was 16: "We'll have this moment forever, but never again." I didn't understand that line when I was in high school, but it stuck with me. Now those simple eight words are almost a kind of mantra for me; and the meaning is clear and illuminating.

http://www.presentationzen.com/presentationzen/2008/07/ichi-go-ichi-e-this-is-the-moment.html


Ichi-go ichi-e, my friend!





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