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csziggy

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Gender: Do not display
Hometown: Leon County, Florida
Member since: Tue Feb 12, 2008, 09:18 PM
Number of posts: 16,299

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Hands down best name I've ever found in genealogy research!

Unfortunately it's not one of my ancestors, but he's probably a distant cousin of some sort.
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Preserved Fish. Born in Dartmouth, MA in 1731.

Not only is that his name, he has a son, grandson, nephews, great nephews, etc. with the same name.

What would you call these two recipes? As a bonus - Rhubarb Custard Pie!

I was given a cookbook that my great grandmother owned - the Cloverland Cook Book by The Young Women’s Auxillary of the First Presbyterian Church, Escanaba, Michigan. There were a few recipes printed in the book attributed to her but there were two handwritten recipes on a piece of paper stuck in the book with no recipe names on them.

What would you call these recipes?
4 pkg cream cheese
1 cup mayonnaise
2 tbsps lemon juice
1 tsp salt
1 cup crushed pineapples
3 cups pitted cherries (dark sweet)
2 cups whipped cream or large can evaporated milk, sugar to sweeten

Blend cheese and mayonnaise, add lemon juice, salt and fruit. Fold in whipped cram, place in tray. Freeze.

Serves 20 people.

1 cup lemon juice
2-2/3 cups orange juice
8 eggs, beaten
2 cups sugar
1 small can evaporated milk, whipped

Heat fruit juices in top of double boiler. Combine eggs and sugar, beat well. Add to fruit juice; cook until thick. Cool. When ready to serve add whipped cream.

There are also several recipes cut from magazines, newspapers and product labels - including some gelatine recipes and one for "Bohemian tea". And since there was a discussion about rhubarb pie, here is my great grandmother's recipe:
Rhubarb Custard Pie
1 cup sugar
1 tablespoon flour
1 cup milk
yolks of two eggs
1 cup sliced rhubarb
Pour into crust and bake. Cover with meringue of whites of eggs.


Found a reference for this cookbook - I think you can download the whole thing in PDF format: http://mmm.lib.msu.edu/record.php?id=45187

Ordered certificates from the British General Records Office

And I'm kind of disappointed.

The first certificate I received was from Lincolnshire for death of the brother of my gr-gr-gr-grandmother. While I knew their father's name, I don't have their mother's name, not even her first name. I was hoping that the death certificate would have some information. Nothing, not even the relationship of the person providing the little information on the death certificate. All I got was the exact date of death rather than the quarter of the year in which he died.

Then I got the birth certificate for my great grandfather from Wales. The birth date I had in my records was actually the date his birth was registered and not his birthday! While it verified his parents' names it didn't add a lot but I didn't expect much more.

I also got his parents' wedding certificate and the wedding certificate for his father when he remarried after my great grandmother died. The new information I got was the actual wedding date, which we didn't previously have, the church where they married (the only church in the tiny village where they lived), and both fathers' names. No mothers' names, which is disappointing. Their wedding certificate does not even have their birth dates or ages, which would have been nice - they are just listed as "of age"!

The wedding certificate for my great grandfather's second wedding does list his age and since his father's name is the same and he's listed as a widower, it verifies that it is the same man. I was not sure - nothing in our family history had him remarrying, so it's nice to be sure.

Now to see if I can leverage these little tidbits into going back another generation. Looking for Mary Morgan in Wales is harder than sorting out John Smiths in this country - knowing that her father was named David might possibly help.

The big problem is that that next generation puts me back before Great Britain kept official records. I guess I need to find out how to get the parish records from that church in that little village....

At roughly 10 Euros per certificate, I wish I had gotten more for my money but at least not all the certificates were a total waste of money.
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