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MinM

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Member since: Mon Oct 8, 2007, 11:23 AM
Number of posts: 2,307

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The Appeal: It's the story of the purchasing of a Supreme Court seat in Mississippi. ~ John Grisham

The Appeal was a book I published. It was always a novel. It’s completely fiction and it’s completely true. It's the story of the purchasing of a Supreme Court seat in Mississippi. ~ John Grisham

Judge Oliver Diaz from "Hot Coffee"

http://www.democraticunderground.com/101644148#post1

Whenever I think of Mississippi politics that John Grisham quote comes to mind. I'd like to be smug about it but my State of Michigan has become just as bad (if not worse).

Charles Guggenheim film commemorates RFK @ 1968 DNC


Four-time Academy Award ® Winner Charles Guggenheim
ROBERT KENNEDY REMEMBERED
TRT 29 minutes Black & White

Shown on all television networks simultaneously and at the Democratic National Convention in August of 1968, this film biography evokes the spirit, quality and commitment Robert Kennedy brought to his life and work.

Accompanied by (if memory serves) this song...

"Abraham, Martin and John" is a 1968 song written by Dick Holler and first recorded by Dion. It is a tribute to the memory of four assassinated Americans, all icons of social change, namely Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King, Jr., John F. Kennedy and Robert F. Kennedy. It was written in response to the assassinations of King and the younger Kennedy in April and June 1968.

Each of the first three verses features one of the men named in the song's title, for example:

Has anybody here, seen my old friend Abraham -
Can you tell me where he's gone?
He freed a lot of people, but it seems the good, they die young
But I just looked around and he's gone.

After a bridge, the fourth and final verse mentions Robert "Bobby" Kennedy, and ends with a description of him walking over a hill with the other three men...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abraham,_Martin_and_John

1968 tribute to Senator Kennedy

http://www.democraticunderground.com/10021289411

51 years ago yesterday President Kennedy chided Bob Byrd ..


at the beginning of this famous 'Peace Speech' @ American U.

Although no President could make such a speech today for fear of being labelled 'Soft' in the "War on Terror" .. I'd like to think that speech 51-years ago (June 10, 1963) left a lasting impression on Senator Robert Byrd and his brother Edward. Apparently it did.

Harry S Truman's CIA Op-Ed

Former President Harry S Truman's CIA Op-Ed that ran for PART of one day in The Washington Post...

Tim Weiner's "history" of the CIA
...So right off the bat, the CIA was doing something Truman didn't want. After Kennedy's assassination, Truman wrote a letter that was published in the Washington Post, in which he stated:

I never had any thought that when I set up the CIA that it would be injected into peacetime cloak and dagger operations. Some of the complications and embarrassment I think we have experienced are in part attributable to the fact that this quiet intelligence arm of the President has been so removed from its intended role that it is being interpreted as a symbol of sinister and mysterious foreign intrigue-and a subject for cold war enemy propaganda.

With all the nonsense put out by Communist propaganda ... the last thing we needed was for the CIA to be seized upon as something akin to a subverting influence in the affairs of other people. ...

NSA was wiretapping [Senator] Frank Church

RUSSELL TICE: We now know that NSA was wiretapping Frank Church and another Senator.

And that got out by accident. All the information the NSA had back then – and probably many other senators and important people too, back in the 70s – they shredded and they destroyed all of that evidence. As much as they could find, they destroyed it all. By accident, something popped up 40 years later.

And, in fact, they were asked 40 years ago whether NSA had bugged Congress. And, of course, they lied. They lied through their teeth...

https://twitter.com/onekade/status/475999206562623488

Ronald Reagan’s Benghazi

... Around dawn on October 23, 1983, I was in Beirut, Lebanon, when a suicide bomber drove a truck laden with the equivalent of twenty-one thousand pounds of TNT into the heart of a U.S. Marine compound, killing two hundred and forty-one servicemen. The U.S. military command, which regarded the Marines’ presence as a non-combative, “peace-keeping mission,” had left a vehicle gate wide open, and ordered the sentries to keep their weapons unloaded. The only real resistance the suicide bomber had encountered was a scrim of concertina wire. When I arrived on the scene a short while later to report on it for the Wall Street Journal, the Marine barracks was flattened. From beneath the dusty, smoking slabs of collapsed concrete, piteous American voices could be heard, begging for help. Thirteen more American servicemen later died from injuries, making it the single deadliest attack on American Marines since the Battle of Iwo Jima.

Six months earlier, militants had bombed the U.S. embassy in Beirut, too, killing sixty-three more people, including seventeen Americans. Among the dead were seven C.I.A. officers, including the agency’s top analyst in the Middle East, an immensely valuable intelligence asset, and the Beirut station chief.

There were more than enough opportunities to lay blame for the horrific losses at high U.S. officials’ feet. But unlike today’s Congress, congressmen did not talk of impeaching Ronald Reagan, who was then President, nor were any subpoenas sent to cabinet members. This was true even though then, as now, the opposition party controlled the majority in the House. Tip O’Neill, the Democratic Speaker of the House, was no pushover. He, like today’s opposition leaders in the House, demanded an investigation—but a real one, and only one. Instead of playing it for political points, a House committee undertook a serious investigation into what went wrong at the barracks in Beirut. Two months later, it issued a report finding “very serious errors in judgment” by officers on the ground, as well as responsibility up through the military chain of command, and called for better security measures against terrorism in U.S. government installations throughout the world.

In other words, Congress actually undertook a useful investigation and made helpful recommendations. The report’s findings, by the way, were bipartisan. (The Pentagon, too, launched an investigation, issuing a report that was widely accepted by both parties.)

In March of 1984, three months after Congress issued its report, militants struck American officials in Beirut again, this time kidnapping the C.I.A.’s station chief, Bill Buckley. Buckley was tortured and, eventually, murdered. Reagan, who was tormented by a tape of Buckley being tortured, blamed himself. Congress held no public hearings, and pointed fingers at the perpetrators, not at political rivals.

If you compare the costs of the Reagan Administration’s serial security lapses in Beirut to the costs of Benghazi, it’s clear what has really deteriorated in the intervening three decades. It’s not the security of American government personnel working abroad. It’s the behavior of American congressmen at home. ...

http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/comment/2014/05/ronald-reagans-benghazi.html

Is USAID the New CIA?

@democracynow: Is USAID the New CIA? Agency Secretly Built Cuban Twitter Program to Fuel Anti-Castro Protests http://owl.li/vqNqe

Actually it's probably more accurate to say that USAID and the CIA have had a good working relationship through the years.

JFK had similar concerns about the Peace Corps.

U.S. secretly created "Cuban Twitter" to stir unrest

Washington Post ‏@washingtonpost: U.S. secretly created "Cuban Twitter" to stir unrest on the communist island http://wapo.st/1j2Zavz

What a surprise..

The Lost Legacy of Otis Pike

@Consortiumnews: Melvin A. Goodman reflects on the legacy of Otis Pike, the heroic congressman who took on the CIA


The Lost Legacy of Otis Pike
January 22, 2014

Former Rep. Otis Pike died Monday at the age of 92, stirring recollections of his courageous efforts in the 1970s to expose abuses committed by the CIA, a struggle that ultimately bogged down as defenders of state secrecy proved too strong, as ex-CIA analyst Melvin A. Goodman writes.

By Melvin A. Goodman

The death of Rep. Otis G. Pike, a nine-term New York congressman, is a sharp reminder that once upon a time this country had congressmen who were willing to conduct oversight of the secretive intelligence community, particularly the Central Intelligence Agency, and press for genuine reform.

In the wake of CIA abuses during the Vietnam War, including the pursuit of political assassination and illegal searches and seizures, Rep. Pike and Sen. Frank Church — both Democrats — established the Pike Committee and the Church Committee in order to create bipartisan congressional oversight of the intelligence community and to place the CIA under a tighter rein...

Pike and Church deserve special praise for exposing the covert role of the CIA in trying to assassinate Third World leaders and pursuing regime change. There were assassination plots against Fidel Castro in Cuba, Patrice Lumumba in Congo, Jacobo Arbenz Guzman in Guatemala, and Ngo Dinh Diem in Vietnam. CIA efforts were particularly clumsy in the case of political assassination, and typically other groups carried out the assassinations before the CIA could get its act together...

http://consortiumnews.com/2014/01/22/the-lost-legacy-of-otis-pike/

Gates Conceals Real Story of “Gaming” Obama


Gates quotes Obama as saying, “ If I believe I am being gamed . . .” and says he left the sentence “hanging there with the clear implication the consequences would be dire.”

Gates writes that he was “pretty upset,” because he thought “implicitly accusing Petraeus” of “gaming” him at a big meeting in the Situation Room was “inappropriate, not to mention highly disrespectful of Petraeus.”

“As I sat there,” Gates recalls, “I thought: the president doesn’t trust his commander, can’t stand Karzai, doesn’t believe in his own strategy, and doesn’t consider the war to be his. For him, it’s all about getting out.”

But Obama’s distrust of Petraeus was clearly related to the sequence of events related to Obama’s policy decision on Afghanistan and Petraeus’s signaling his desire to undermine it – all of which Gates omits from his account...

Whatever Petraeus did in the early weeks of 2011 to raise the ire of Obama in regard to the withdrawal issue, it was against the backdrop of repeated indications that Petraeus was hoping to use both his alliances with Gates and Clinton and pressures from the Republicans in Congress to push back the previously agreed date for beginning withdrawal and handoff of responsibility to the Afghan government.

Gates knew, therefore, that Obama was reacting to a history of having already been “gamed” not only by Petraeus himself but also by his bureaucratic allies maneuvering to remove the restrictions on the Afghan War that Obama had imposed. The self-serving Gates account conceals the dishonest tactics employed to get Obama’s agreement to the Afghan War escalation.

http://www.globalresearch.ca/former-secretary-of-defense-robert-gates-conceals-real-story-of-gaming-obama-on-afghan-war/5364761

There are some obvious parallels between the way the military has tried to play Obama and the the way they tried to play JFK.

Although I will give Gates some credit for his hubris in putting his name to these selective critiques of President Obama. Allen Dulles made his case anonymously through his friends at Fortune Magazine.

BTW .. credit to you Octafish for revealing the true nature of Robert Gates for years now. Kudos also to Robert Parry at consortiumnews.com
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