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friendly_iconoclast

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Member since: Fri Sep 8, 2006, 12:47 PM
Number of posts: 11,808

Journal Archives

The peril of hipster economics

http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/2014/05/peril-hipster-economics-2014527105521158885.html

The peril of hipster economics
When urban decay becomes a set piece to be remodelled or romanticised.

Last updated: 28 May 2014 08:03
Sarah Kendzior

On May 16, an artist, a railway service and a government agency spent $291,978 to block poverty from the public eye.

Called psychylustro, German artist Katharina Grosse's project is a large-scale work designed to distract Amtrak train riders from the dilapidated buildings and fallen factories of north Philadelphia. The city has a 28 percent poverty rate - the highest of any major US city - with much of it concentrated in the north. In some north Philadelphia elementary schools, nearly every child is living below the poverty line.

Grosse partnered with the National Endowment of the Arts and Amtrak to mask North Philadelphia's hardship with a delightful view. The Wall Street Journal calls this "Fighting Urban Blight With Art". Liz Thomas, the curator of the project, calls it "an experience that asks people to think about this space that they hurtle through every day".

The project is not actually fighting blight, of course - only the ability of Amtrak customers to see it...


Aaargh...
Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Thu Jun 12, 2014, 11:49 PM (0 replies)

It's already been held to be a *bad* thing, if true, on this thread:

Bad for 'progress' on guns, dontcha know...

I'll repost the decidedly malodorous post in full, on the slim chance the poster regains a
residual sense of shame and self-deletes or edits it (the particularly repellent bit
is highlighted):

http://www.democraticunderground.com/10025067601#post7

Response to pnwmom (Original post)

Schema Thing (9,226 posts) Sun Jun 8, 2014, 11:12 PM
7. Your conclusion does not follow from the paragraphs you quoted

It's possible, but definitely not inferred by the text. Almost the opposite is inferred, ie: a citizen may have shot and injured one of the two bad guys. I hope not, because that is the last thing we need to make progress wrt guns, but hope does not change the text quoted above.
Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Mon Jun 9, 2014, 12:55 AM (1 replies)

U.S. Marshals Seize Cops’ Spying Records to Keep Them From the ACLU

More transperancy...

http://www.wired.com/2014/06/feds-seize-stingray-documents/


U.S. Marshals Seize Cops’ Spying Records to Keep Them From the ACLU

By Kim Zetter
06.03.14 | 6:15 pm

A routine request in Florida for public records regarding the use of a surveillance tool known as stingray took an extraordinary turn recently when federal authorities seized the documents before police could release them.

The surprise move by the U.S. Marshals Service stunned the American Civil Liberties Union, which earlier this year filed the public records request with the Sarasota, Florida, police department for information detailing its use of the controversial surveillance tool.

The ACLU had an appointment last Tuesday to review documents pertaining to a case investigated by a Sarasota police detective. But marshals swooped in at the last minute to grab the records, claiming they belong to the U.S. Marshals Service and barring the police from releasing them.

ACLU staff attorney Nathan Freed Wessler called the move “truly extraordinary and beyond the worst transparency violations” the group has seen regarding documents detailing police use of the technology.


The original post from the ACLU:

https://www.aclu.org/blog/national-security-technology-and-liberty/us-marshals-seize-local-cops-cell-phone-tracking-files

U.S. Marshals Seize Local Cops’ Cell Phone Tracking Files in Extraordinary Attempt to Keep Information From Public
06/03/2014

Government Secrecy
By Nathan Freed Wessler, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy & Technology Project at 12:13pm

...RED FLAG #1: The Sarasota Police initially told us that they had responsive records, including applications filed by and orders issued to a local detective under the state “trap and trace” statute that he had relied on for authorization to conduct stingray surveillance. That raised the first red flag, since trap and trace orders are typically used to gather limited information about the phone numbers of incoming calls, not to track cell phones inside private spaces or conduct dragnet surveillance. And, such orders require a very low legal standard. As one federal magistrate judge has held, police should be permitted to use stingrays only after obtaining a probable cause warrant, if at all.

RED FLAG #2: The Sarasota Police set up an appointment for us to inspect the applications and orders, as required by Florida law. But a few hours before that appointment, an assistant city attorney sent an email cancelling the meeting on the basis that the U.S. Marshals Service was claiming the records as their own and instructing the local cops not to release them. Their explanation: the Marshals Service had deputized the local officer, and therefore the records were actually the property of the federal government.

We emphatically disagree, since the Sarasota detective created the applications, brought them to court, and retained the applications and orders in his files. Merely giving him a second title (“Special Deputy U.S. Marshal”) does not change these facts. But regardless, once the Sarasota Police Department received our records request, state law required them to hold onto the records for at least 30 days, to give us an opportunity to go to court and seek an order for release of the documents.

Instead of complying with that clear legal obligation, the local police allowed the records to disappear by letting the U.S. Marshals drive down from their office in Tampa, seize the physical files, and move them to an unknown location. We’ve seen our fair share of federal government attempts to keep records about stingrays secret, but we’ve never seen an actual physical raid on state records in order to conceal them from public view.
Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Thu Jun 5, 2014, 01:59 PM (0 replies)

U.S. Marshals Seize Cops’ Spying Records to Keep Them From the ACLU

http://www.wired.com/2014/06/feds-seize-stingray-documents/


U.S. Marshals Seize Cops’ Spying Records to Keep Them From the ACLU

By Kim Zetter
06.03.14 | 6:15 pm

A routine request in Florida for public records regarding the use of a surveillance tool known as stingray took an extraordinary turn recently when federal authorities seized the documents before police could release them.

The surprise move by the U.S. Marshals Service stunned the American Civil Liberties Union, which earlier this year filed the public records request with the Sarasota, Florida, police department for information detailing its use of the controversial surveillance tool.

The ACLU had an appointment last Tuesday to review documents pertaining to a case investigated by a Sarasota police detective. But marshals swooped in at the last minute to grab the records, claiming they belong to the U.S. Marshals Service and barring the police from releasing them.

ACLU staff attorney Nathan Freed Wessler called the move “truly extraordinary and beyond the worst transparency violations” the group has seen regarding documents detailing police use of the technology.


The original post from the ACLU:

https://www.aclu.org/blog/national-security-technology-and-liberty/us-marshals-seize-local-cops-cell-phone-tracking-files

U.S. Marshals Seize Local Cops’ Cell Phone Tracking Files in Extraordinary Attempt to Keep Information From Public
06/03/2014

Government Secrecy
By Nathan Freed Wessler, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy & Technology Project at 12:13pm

...RED FLAG #1: The Sarasota Police initially told us that they had responsive records, including applications filed by and orders issued to a local detective under the state “trap and trace” statute that he had relied on for authorization to conduct stingray surveillance. That raised the first red flag, since trap and trace orders are typically used to gather limited information about the phone numbers of incoming calls, not to track cell phones inside private spaces or conduct dragnet surveillance. And, such orders require a very low legal standard. As one federal magistrate judge has held, police should be permitted to use stingrays only after obtaining a probable cause warrant, if at all.

RED FLAG #2: The Sarasota Police set up an appointment for us to inspect the applications and orders, as required by Florida law. But a few hours before that appointment, an assistant city attorney sent an email cancelling the meeting on the basis that the U.S. Marshals Service was claiming the records as their own and instructing the local cops not to release them. Their explanation: the Marshals Service had deputized the local officer, and therefore the records were actually the property of the federal government.

We emphatically disagree, since the Sarasota detective created the applications, brought them to court, and retained the applications and orders in his files. Merely giving him a second title (“Special Deputy U.S. Marshal”) does not change these facts. But regardless, once the Sarasota Police Department received our records request, state law required them to hold onto the records for at least 30 days, to give us an opportunity to go to court and seek an order for release of the documents.

Instead of complying with that clear legal obligation, the local police allowed the records to disappear by letting the U.S. Marshals drive down from their office in Tampa, seize the physical files, and move them to an unknown location. We’ve seen our fair share of federal government attempts to keep records about stingrays secret, but we’ve never seen an actual physical raid on state records in order to conceal them from public view.
Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Thu Jun 5, 2014, 01:56 PM (0 replies)

Looks like SAF just might have a new sugar daddy

http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2014/05/27/deleo-unveils-bill-strengthen-gun-laws-mass/Y7CUFEFhGcOHnY6D5GJTmI/story.html

DeLeo pushes tighter gun law

More police say on ownership; curbs on sales

By Brian MacQuarrie | Globe Staff May 28, 2014


...The new proposal seeks to tighten and clarify state regulations about who can buy guns and how they can be bought. One potentially contentious change would give police the discretion to deny a permit for a rifle or shotgun if an applicant is deemed unsuitable.

Under current law, police can apply a vague standard of unsuitability for licenses to carry a gun. But police do not have that discretion in issuing the Firearms Identification Card, which allows Massachusetts residents who pass a background check to buy a small-capacity rifle or shotgun...


Umm, Mister Speaker? You might want to have a chat with Rahm Emanuel about that bit...

If this part goes through and gets tossed in court, I'd consider my share a small
price to pay to help put a stake through the heart of "may issue" laws.

Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Wed May 28, 2014, 10:19 PM (2 replies)

Gun Safety Proponent Cites 'Fool-Proof' E-Voting Systems in SUPPORT of 'Smart Gun' Technology

http://www.bradblog.com/?p=10612


Gun Safety Proponent Cites 'Fool-Proof' E-Voting Systems in SUPPORT of 'Smart Gun' Technology(!)
By Brad Friedman on 5/6/2014, 6:05am PT

On Monday night's All In with Chris Hayes on MSNBC, New Jersey State Senate Majority Leader Loretta Weinberg joined Hayes to discuss "smart gun" legislation she helped pass in her state. But it was the curious assertion by a supporter of the technology, claiming that electronic voting machines are now "fool-proof", which kinda just blew my mind.

Mark Glaze, spokesman for Everytown for Gun Safety, a group which, according to its website "brings together survivors of gun violence to share their stories and advocate for laws that will prevent future tragedies," said twice during the conversation, that e-voting systems are now "fool-proof."

While there were once concerns about e-voting systems, he said (see his full remarks below), those worries have now been assuaged thanks to "public and private partnerships at both the federal and state level that guaranteed that these machines were fool-proof".


Video here:

http://www.msnbc.com/all-in/watch/weinberg-offers-nra-a-truce-on-smart-guns-247525443925

(Glaze's comments are found at 4:20 in)
Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Thu May 22, 2014, 02:01 PM (1 replies)

Part-time faculty at Northeastern will form union, aiding wider push

http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2014/05/15/part-time-faculty-northeastern-vote-unionize/dOsEDnh6Tm13KmB952R07M/story.html


Part-time faculty at Northeastern will form union, aiding wider push

By Matt Rocheleau
Globe Correspondent May 15, 2014


Part-time faculty at Northeastern University have voted to form a union, supporters announced Thursday — the biggest victory yet for area adjunct professors demanding better pay, benefits, and working conditions.

The 961 Northeastern adjuncts became the third and largest group of part-time faculty locally to organize since the Service Employees International Union launched a national campaign in 2012. Part-time faculty at Tufts and Lesley universities previously voted to unionize.

The push has broad implications for the local universities, economic engines for the region that have come to depend on the low cost and flexibility of adjunct faculty as tenure-track positions become scarcer.

Adjunct faculty at Northeastern, where 52 percent of faculty are part time, praised the vote on Thursday, saying they hoped it addresses inequities on the campus.
Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Sun May 18, 2014, 11:16 PM (0 replies)

Bookmarking for classic antigun ranting and cultural warfare

IMHO, this ranks right up there with these classic examples of "post first, think later":

http://www.democraticunderground.com/discuss/duboard.php?az=view_all&address=118x270147

http://election.democraticunderground.com/discuss/duboard.php?az=view_all&address=118x285630

http://www.democraticunderground.com/10022928786

I might have let it slide if the OP hadn't doubled down on their bigotry and stereotyping in post #5:

http://www.democraticunderground.com/1172145326#post5
Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Wed May 7, 2014, 05:39 PM (1 replies)

Why didn't you just say: "We have *always* been at war with Eastasia"...

...and be done with it? It would be just as credible, and saved billions of wasted electrons.
Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Wed May 7, 2014, 02:53 PM (0 replies)

Remember, *they* need guns- YOU don't...

Working for a billionaire has its perks- apparently, it means you have more rights
than the people you are purportedly trying to make safer. (Before one of the
DwellsUnderBridges tribe chimes in with the associational fallacy, I heartily dislike
Dana Loesch):

https://twitter.com/erikasotolamb/status/460218377441910785

Dana Loesch ‏@DLoesch Apr 26

Hi @erikasotolamb , I wish your other Bloomberg colleagues were as polite as you: http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2014/ … . Why do you have armed security?
Details
Reply
Retweet
Favorite

Erika Soto Lamb ‏@erikasotolamb

.@DLoesch we have armed security because other people on your side of the debate threaten our lives. I wish it weren't the case, but it is.


http://www.linkedin.com/in/erikasotolamb


Erika Soto Lamb's Overview

Current
Communications Director at Mayors Against Illegal Guns

Past
Director at The Raben Group
Vice President at Ketchum
Director at O'Neill and Associates

see all
Education

Columbia University in the City of New York
Stanford University
J.M. Hanks High School

Connections

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Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Wed Apr 30, 2014, 04:14 PM (4 replies)
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