HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » friendly_iconoclast » Journal
Page: « Prev 1 ... 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 ... 43 Next »

friendly_iconoclast

Profile Information

Member since: Fri Sep 8, 2006, 12:47 PM
Number of posts: 13,260

Journal Archives

SCREW YOU, FEDS! Dozen or more US libraries line up to run Tor exit nodes

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/09/17/library_freedom_project_dozen_more_tor_nodes/

A dozen libraries across the US have asked for details on how to host Tor exit nodes following a decision by the small town of Lebanon, New Hampshire, to forego police warnings.

Following a decision by the library's board of trustees earlier this week to put the exit node back online, the founder of the Library Freedom Project, Alison Macrina, said that she had heard from a number of other libraries interested in hosting Tor nodes...

...There was consternation at the government's actions, however, and the issue quickly centered on freedom of speech. At its meeting, following the vocal backing of residents, the board unanimously decided to turn it back on.

Macrina now says that the DHS' efforts have put her project on the map. "This has catalyzed additional libraries and community members," she told Motherboard. "Folks have emailed me saying 'We don't care if it gets shut down, we want to push back against '."


Note: this is a follow-up to

First Library to Support Anonymous Internet Browsing Effort Stops After DHS Email

http://www.democraticunderground.com/1016131944

http://www.democraticunderground.com/11681466

and

Library’s Tor relay—which had been pulled after Feds noticed—now restored

http://www.democraticunderground.com/11681473


The Library Freedom Project site can be found at:

https://libraryfreedomproject.org/


Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Thu Sep 24, 2015, 12:13 AM (1 replies)

Library’s Tor relay—which had been pulled after Feds noticed—now restored

Note: this is a follow-up to

http://www.democraticunderground.com/11681466

First Library to Support Anonymous Internet Browsing Effort Stops After DHS Email

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2015/09/small-town-library-restores-tor-relay-which-had-gone-dark-for-weeks/

The New Hampshire library, which last week took down a Tor relay after federal authorities read about it on Ars, has finally restored its important link in the anonymizing network.

The node was turned back on Tuesday evening immediately after the board of the Kilton Public Library in Lebanon voted to do so...

...As Ars reported earlier, the goal of the Library Freedom Project is to set up Tor exit relays in as many of these ubiquitous public institutions as possible. As of now, only about 1,000 exit relays exist worldwide. If this plan is successful, it could vastly increase the scope and speed of the famed anonymizing network. For now, Kilton has a middle relay but has plans to convert it to an exit relay. A middle relay passes traffic to another relay before departing the Tor network on the exit relay.

A Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) special agent first learned of the plan after reading Ars’ July 30 article and then forwarded it on as a heads-up to a local police officer on the New Hampshire Internet Crimes Against Children task force. That, in turn, led to a meeting between local law enforcement, city officials, and the library. (HSI is the investigative arm of the Department of Homeland Security.)


Kudos to the Kilton Public Library!

Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Thu Sep 17, 2015, 01:09 AM (1 replies)

First Library to Support Anonymous Internet Browsing Effort Stops After DHS Email

https://www.propublica.org/article/library-support-anonymous-internet-browsing-effort-stops-after-dhs-email

A library in a small New Hampshire town started to help Internet users around the world surf anonymously using Tor. Until the Department of Homeland Security raised a red flag.

by Julia Angwin
ProPublica, Sep. 10, 2015, 11:20 a.m.

...In July, the Kilton Public Library in Lebanon, New Hampshire, was the first library in the country to become part of the anonymous Web surfing service Tor. The library allowed Tor users around the world to bounce their Internet traffic through the library, thus masking users’ locations.

Soon after state authorities received an email about it from an agent at the Department of Homeland Security.

“The Department of Homeland Security got in touch with our Police Department,” said Sean Fleming, the library director of the Lebanon Public Libraries.

After a meeting at which local police and city officials discussed how Tor could be exploited by criminals, the library pulled the plug on the project...



So much for "Live Free or Die"...
Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Thu Sep 10, 2015, 10:45 PM (4 replies)

First Library to Support Anonymous Internet Browsing Effort Stops After DHS Email

https://www.propublica.org/article/library-support-anonymous-internet-browsing-effort-stops-after-dhs-email

A library in a small New Hampshire town started to help Internet users around the world surf anonymously using Tor. Until the Department of Homeland Security raised a red flag.

by Julia Angwin
ProPublica, Sep. 10, 2015, 11:20 a.m.

...In July, the Kilton Public Library in Lebanon, New Hampshire, was the first library in the country to become part of the anonymous Web surfing service Tor. The library allowed Tor users around the world to bounce their Internet traffic through the library, thus masking users’ locations.

Soon after state authorities received an email about it from an agent at the Department of Homeland Security.

“The Department of Homeland Security got in touch with our Police Department,” said Sean Fleming, the library director of the Lebanon Public Libraries.

After a meeting at which local police and city officials discussed how Tor could be exploited by criminals, the library pulled the plug on the project. ...


So much for "Live Free or Die"...
Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Thu Sep 10, 2015, 10:42 PM (0 replies)

Leaked Files Show How the Heritage Foundation Navigates the Reactionary Views of Wealthy Donors

Heritage claimed last week that this was a hack:

http://www.democraticunderground.com/10141196433

"Data breach: Heritage Foundation emails, donor info stolen"


http://gawker.com/leaked-files-show-how-the-heritage-foundation-navigates-1727706821

Late last month, a strange file appeared on an Amazon server belonging to the Heritage Foundation, an influential Washington, D.C.-based think tank that remains widely regarded as one of the country’s most serious and respectable conservative institutions. The file—which appears to have been unintentionally uploaded by a Heritage staffer, rather than obtained by an intruder—offers a remarkable window into how Heritage maintains this reputation. It contains hundreds of emails and thousands of pages of internal fundraising reports documenting how the foundation navigated the flood of conservative conspiracy-mongering that followed Obama’s election in 2008, and how its staffers discussed the increasingly bizarre ideologies of its donor class with puzzlement and occasional derision.

The file, which has since been deleted, is a Microsoft Outlook backup folder that appears to have been associated with an assistant director at Heritage named Steve DeBuhr, who belongs to the foundation’s “major gifts team” and handles donor relations in the Midwest. In that capacity, he received regularly updated “call reports” containing detailed dossiers on current and potential donors as well as DeBuhr’s and other development officers’ various interactions with those donors throughout the country. By all accounts, the file appears to be authentic: It surfaced on the same server (thf_media.s3.amazonaws.com) where Heritage hosts policy papers and membership forms.

Between 2008 and 2009, Heritage raised approximately $135,000,000 in tax-deductible donations from private charities and individuals, according to publicly available tax filings. One of those individuals was a Pennsylvania businessman named Robert W. Ellis, who between 1994 and 2008 gave 40 gifts totaling nearly $250,000 to the foundation. DeBuhr’s records indicate Ellis’s development officer, a Heritage employee named Jeffrey Trimbath, met Ellis in person at least seven times between July 2008 and June 2009. In notes taken after those meetings, Trimbath characterized what he took to be Ellis’s views toward Muslims and liberals.


Short version: Heritage plays rich, right-wing nutters for big money
Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Thu Sep 10, 2015, 12:47 AM (2 replies)

The best cosplay outfit seen yet this year: Immortan Trump

Via BoingBoing:


?zoom=1.5&w=100%25
Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Tue Sep 8, 2015, 10:41 PM (5 replies)

Legal challenge alleges authorities withheld police use of stingray surveillance

http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/baltimore-city/bs-md-ci-stingray-challenge-20150904-story.html

A Baltimore defense attorney has filed the first of what could be hundreds of challenges to cases in which police allegedly withheld that they had used a high-tech phone tracking device to gather evidence.

The attorney, Joshua Insley, had questioned last fall whether the surveillance equipment known as a stingray was used in the case against his client, Shemar Taylor, who was accused of stealing a cellphone.

Prosecutors and police at the time denied that investigators had used a stingray, but on the witness stand a detective refused to answer questions about what technology they did use. The judge threatened to hold the detective in contempt when he cited a confidentiality agreement with the federal government and refused to answer the judge's questions.

Since then, there have been a number of disclosures about how police use the technology. Insley pointed to the release of a police log of cases in which a stingray was used, which he says proves one was used in Taylor's case.


A good introduction for those unfamiliar with 'stingrays', and how police have been
secretly using them:

http://www.usatoday.com/topic/f764896f-76b5-4789-a58e-e333b9b5bcfc/cellphone-surveillance/
Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Fri Sep 4, 2015, 10:53 PM (0 replies)

Sex, drugs, and racist policing in Rutland, Vermont

https://www.bostonglobe.com/opinion/2015/08/26/institutionalized-racism-bernie-sanders-backyard/xawl4yZbg0KnBPZDK73cSP/story.html

Sex, drugs, and racist policing in Rutland, Vt.

By Farah Stockman Globe Staff August 26, 2015

...Thanks to a lawsuit filed in Rutland, Vt., the world is about to get a rare, behind-the-dashcam look at police culture in a rural Vermont town. It ain’t pretty.

To be sure, police in Rutland have a tough job. The once-idyllic town has battled the scourge of heroin for years. New York City drug dealers flock there to sell their wares at a higher profit.

But there’s a right way and a wrong way to tackle this problem. Rutland chose the wrong way: Two white police officers — Sergeant John Johnson and Officer Earl Post — began strip-searching black men coming off the Amtrak train.

They manufactured probable cause, claiming they’d gotten a tip from a “confidential informant,” according to the lawsuit, filed by Andy Todd, who served for years as the only black officer on Rutland’s force.


Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Sun Aug 30, 2015, 02:32 PM (4 replies)

Before I logged on, I just *knew* someone would use the VA tragedy to tout a moral panic-and...

...my expectations were, of course, met:

(x-posted from the other forum)

http://www.democraticunderground.com/12629567

I would like to take today as a chance...

...to express my continued commitment to using my voice and all political and rhetorical means necessary to slow and stop this nation's obsession with guns and the violence they perpetuate. It has no place in our democracy and it has no place on DU.
Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Thu Aug 27, 2015, 02:24 AM (13 replies)

The Google Search That Made the CIA Spy on the US Senate

https://news.vice.com/article/the-google-search-that-made-the-cia-spy-on-the-us-senate

The Google Search That Made the CIA Spy on the US Senate
By Jason Leopold
August 12, 2015 | 12:15 pm

John Brennan was about to say he was sorry.

On July 28, 2014, the CIA director wrote a letter to senators Dianne Feinstein and Saxby Chambliss — the chairwoman of the Senate Intelligence Committee (SSCI) and the panel's ranking Republican, respectively. In it, he admitted that the CIA's penetration of the computer network used by committee staffers reviewing the agency's torture program — a breach for which Feinstein and Chambliss had long demanded accountability — was improper and violated agreements the Intelligence Committee had made with the CIA.

The letter was notable in part because Brennan initially denied the January 2014 search of the Senate's computer network even took place. And later, when it became clear that it had — and that he had known of it while publicly denying that it happened — he refused to acknowledge that it was wrong. For months, Feinstein and other committee members were clamoring for a written apology to make part of the official record.

Brennan's mea culpa was prompted by a memo he'd received 10 days earlier from CIA Inspector General David Buckley. After the Office of the Inspector General (OIG) was tasked with looking into the intrusion, it found that the CIA employees who broke into the Senate's computer network in hopes of tracking down CIA documents the Senate wasn't allowed to see (according to the agency) may have broken federal laws.

"I recently received a briefing on the findings, and want to inform you that the investigation found support for your concern that CIA staff had improperly accessed the shared drive on the RDINet when conducting a limited search for CIA privileged documents," Brennan wrote. "In particular, the judged that Agency officers' access to the… shared drive was inconsistent with the common understanding reached in 2009 between the Committee and the Agency regarding access to RDINet. Consequently, I apologize for the actions of CIA officers…. I am committed to correcting the shortcomings that this report has revealed."...


?output-quality=75

?output-quality=75

Very long, but well worth reading. Turns out, the Panetta Report leaking
was due to the CIA's IT contractor fucking up, not the Senate staffers hacking into
the CIA's database. Also, the CIA asked Vice not to release the letter that the CIA
had given them ('by mistake', is the claim) but Vice said no, and so you see it
Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Wed Aug 12, 2015, 11:37 PM (3 replies)
Go to Page: « Prev 1 ... 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 ... 43 Next »