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gejohnston

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Gender: Do not display
Hometown: Rock Springs, Wyoming
Current location: Sweetwater County, Wyoming & Citrus County, Florida
Member since: Mon Aug 7, 2006, 12:19 AM
Number of posts: 15,417

Journal Archives

former NRA lobbyist says NRA more about own pockets than gun owners

http://www.amazon.com/Ricochet-Confessions-Lobbyist-Richard-Feldman/dp/0471679283

Among the many dirty little secrets that Feldman exposes are the phenomenal salaries received by CEO Wayne LaPierre and other high-ranking NRA officials. These generous remunerations, which place NRA executives among the highest-paid officials of any tax-exempt organization, are funded by biannual "crisis du jour" fund-raising drives, in which members are exhorted to donate additional funds to fend off the latest alleged threat to their Second Amendment rights.

http://www.independentfirearmowners.org/
As far as I can tell, their board of directors don't include has been fourth rate rockers, bat shit crazy neocons, or any of the baggage the NRA has for the past 35 years.
I found the interview interesting.

DIY tractors and other cool stuff



http://opensourceecology.org/wiki/Marcin_Jakubowski

justice served but still denied

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/03/jerry-hartfield-texas-inmate-retrial_n_2404738.html


The Texas Court of Criminal Appeals overturned Hartfield's murder conviction in 1980 because it found a potential juror improperly was dismissed for expressing reservations about the death penalty. The state tried twice but failed to get the court to re-examine that ruling, and on March 15, 1983 11 days after the court's second rejection then-Gov. Mark White commuted Hartfield's sentence to life in prison.

At that point, with Hartfield off death row and back in the general prison population, the case became dormant.

"Nothing got filed. They had me thinking my case was on appeal for 27 years," said Hartfield, who is described in court documents as an illiterate fifth-grade dropout with an IQ of 51, but who says he has since learned to read and has become a devout Christian.

A federal judge in Houston recently ruled that Hartfield's conviction and sentence ceased to exist when the appeals court overturned them meaning there was no sentence for White to commute. But Hartfield isn't likely to go free or be retried soon because the state has challenged a 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals' decision favorable to Hartfield, arguing he missed a one-year window in which to appeal aspects of his case.
I'm not a lawyer, but if your conviction is overturned are you not supposed to freely walk out the gate instead of just moving from one cell to another?
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