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polly7

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Deadliest Terror in the World: The West’s Latest Gift to Africa

by Dan Glazebrook / November 30th, 2015

Nigeria’s Boko Haram are now officially the deadliest terror group in the world. That they have reached this position is a direct consequence of Cameron and Co’s war on Libya – and one that was perhaps not entirely unintended.

In 2009, the year they took up arms, Boko Haram had nothing like the capacity to mount such operations, and their equipment remained primitive; but by 2011, that had begun to change. As Peter Weber noted in The Week, their weapons “shifted from relatively cheap AK-47s in the early days of its post-2009 embrace of violence to desert-ready combat vehicles and anti-aircraft/ anti-tank guns”. This dramatic turnaround in the group’s access to materiel was the direct result of NATO’s war on Libya. A UN report published in early 2012 warned that “large quantities of weapons and ammunition from Libyan stockpiles were smuggled into the Sahel region”, including “rocket-propelled grenades, machine guns with anti-aircraft visors, automatic rifles, ammunition, grenades, explosives (Semtex), and light anti-aircraft artillery (light caliber bi-tubes) mounted on vehicles”, and probably also more advanced weapons such as surface-to-air missiles and MANPADS (man-portable air-defence systems). NATO had effectively turned over the entire armoury of an advanced industrial state to the region’s most sectarian militias: groups such as the Libyan Islamic Fighting Group, Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb and Boko Haram.

The earliest casualty of NATO’s war outside Libya was Mali. Taureg fighters who had worked in Gaddafi’s security forces fled Libya soon after Gaddafi’s government was overthrown, and mounted an insurgency in Northern Mali. They, in turn, were overthrown, however, by Al Qaeda’s regional affiliates – flush with Libyan weaponry – who then turned Northern Mali into another base from which to train and launch attacks. Boko Haram was a key beneficiary. As Brendan O’ Neill wrote in an excellent 2014 article worth quoting at length:

Boko Haram benefited enormously from the vacuum created in once-peaceful northern Mali following the West’s ousting of Gaddafi. In two ways: first, it honed its guerrilla skills by fighting alongside more practised Islamists in Mali, such as AQIM; and second, it accumulated some of the estimated 15,000 pieces of Libyan military hardware and weaponry that leaked across the country’s borders following the sweeping aside of Gaddafi. In April 2012, Agence France France Presse reported that ‘dozens of Boko Haram fighters’ were assisting AQIM and others in northern Mali. This had a devastating knock-on effect in Nigeria. As the Washington Post reported in early 2013, ‘The Islamist insurgency in northern Nigeria has entered a more violent phase as militants return to the fight with sophisticated weaponry and tactics learned on the battlefields of nearby Mali’. A Nigerian analyst said ‘Boko Haram’s level of audacity was high ’, immediately following the movement of some of its militants to the Mali region.


That NATO’s Libya war would have such consequences was both thoroughly predictable, and widely predicted. As early as June 2011, African Union Chairman Jean Ping warned NATO that “Africa’s concern is that weapons that are delivered to one side or another…are already in the desert and will arm terrorists and fuel trafficking”. And both Mali and Algeria strongly opposed NATO’s destruction of Libya precisely because of the massive destabilisation it would bring to the region. They argued, wrote O’Neill, “that such a violent upheaval in a region like north Africa could have potentially catastrophic consequences. The fallout from the bombing is ‘a real source of concern’, said the rulers of Mali in October 2011. In fact, as the BBC reported, they had been arguing since ‘the start of the conflict in Libya’ – that is, since the civil conflict between Benghazi-based militants and Gaddafi began – that ‘the fall of Gaddafi would have a destabilising effect in the region’.” In an op-ed following the collapse of Northern Mali, a former Chief of Staff of UK land forces, Major-General Jonathan Shaw, wrote that Colonel Gaddafi was a “lynchpin” of the “informal Sahel security plan”, whose removal therefore led to a foreseeable collapse of security across the entire region. The rise of Boko Haram has been but one result – and not without strategic benefits for the West.


Full article: http://dissidentvoice.org/2015/11/deadliest-terror-in-the-world-the-wests-latest-gift-to-africa/

Seriously ....... this is a NSS article for all of us who knew that getting rid of Qaddafi to get into Africa was just one of the reasons for the lying 'no-fly zone' and subsequent bombings and horror. I don't believe for one millisecond that those who were involved in this didn't see the consequences perfectly clear. Give them an opportunity to form, grow, and arm them (indirectly, of course), then go in to 'save' their victims ........ it never fucking ends.

I support the FACTS, no matter who writes them, and I don't really care if you

know I do, or not.

Burma’s Million-Strong Rohingya Population Faces ‘Final Stages of Genocide,’ Says Report

“The Rohingya face the final stages of genocide,” concludes the report.

ISCI uses noted genocide expert Daniel Feierstein’s framework of the six stages of genocide, outlined in his 2014 book Genocide as Social Practice, as a lens through which to view Burma. Through interviews with stakeholders on both sides of what it describes as ethnic cleansing, as well as media reports and leaked government documents, the report enumerates how the Rohingya have undergone the first four stages — stigmatization and dehumanization; harassment, violence and terror; isolation and segregation; systematic weakening — and are on the verge of “mass annihilation.” The sixth stage, which involves the “removal of the victim group from collective history,” is already under way in many respects, the report says.


Since then, close to 140,000 Rohingya have been sequestered in squalid camps outside the state’s capital, heavily guarded and prevented from leaving by security forces. The 4,500 that remain in Sittwe reside in a run-down ghetto with similar restrictions on movement. A majority of the Rohingya, numbering about 800,000, are spread out across two townships in northern Rakhine state — another region completely blocked off from the outside world by the military.

A lot of the food rations sent by international aid organizations never make it to the Rohingya camps, and denial of access to adequate health care have turned them into hotbeds for malnutrition and disease. As a result of the apartheid-like conditions, the inhabitants of these camps are also largely prevented from receiving an education and earning any sort of livelihood.

“The abuses that the Rohingya are experiencing are at a level and scale that we have not seen elsewhere in Southeast Asia,” Matthew Smith, the founder and executive director of Bangkok-based nonprofit Fortify Rights, tells TIME. The human-rights organization has been documenting abuses in Burma, and Smith echoes the assertion that there is a strong reason to believe state-enabled ethnic cleansing is taking place in the country.

“The Rohingya don’t have to be annihilated for someone to be held responsible for the crime of genocide,” he says. “They are creating conditions of life for over a million people that are designed to be destructive.”


They have also been denied the right to participate in the upcoming Nov. 8 general elections, a complete reversal from the last election in 2010 when Rohingya voted in large numbers and some were elected to the legislature, as the military-backed government yoked their animosity to the Rakhine to see of the challenge of ethnic parties aligned with the latter.

No political party has countered the Islamophobic national narrative, with even the liberal National League for Democracy (NLD) of Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi going to the polls without a single Muslim candidate, and the Rohingya’s deplorable situation will likely endure no matter the election’s result.


“There will be no change for the Rohingya,” says Shwe Maung, a Rohingya lawmaker from northern Rakhine state who has been barred from re-election. “The government is totally denying our community, totally denying our ethnicity,” he tells TIME. “Whatever is happening is with the ultimate objective of genocide or cleansing, which is to finish these people … and to drive them out.”


http://time.com/4089276/burma-rohingya-genocide-report-documentary/


One of Aung San Suu Kyi’s key officials has said that helping the persecuted Rohingya minority is not a priority, days after her party clinched victory in Burma’s historic elections.

U Win Htein, a spokesman and leading figure in Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy (NLD), said the Rohingya’ Muslims' plight was not top of the agenda for his party, which won nearly 80 per cent of the seats available in the poll.

“We have other priorities,” he said. “Peace, the peaceful transition of power, economic development and constitutional reform.”
He also echoed the current military-backed government’s rhetoric about the Rohingya, suggesting they are illegal immigrants from Bangladesh.

Suu Kyi has been internationally criticised for her silence on the Rohingya, but comments in the wake of the election – when she said all people in Burma would be protected when her government formed in early 2016 – renewed hope she would do something once she took power.

The latest intervention, however, suggested otherwise.


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/destinations/asia/burma/12006208/Aung-San-Suu-Kyi-aide-Rohingya-are-not-our-priority.html


Can democracy and genocide co-exist in Burma?

By Murtaza Shaikh
Source: open democracy
November 30, 2015

We have witnessed a momentous and historic event in Burma (Myanmar); the first real glimpses of democracy with the military dictatorship making way for the landslide victory of Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, Aung San Suu Kyi after over two decades of political exile at an immeasurable personal cost.

However, there is a story behind the headlines and jubilation, to a large extent sidelined and omitted, perhaps because it inconveniently complicates and even undermines the simplistic narrative of democratic triumph over dictatorship, of absolute good overcoming absolute evil. That barely visible story, rather than a minor detail, demands our full attention, especially if the purpose behind the electoral exercise was a future democratic Burma, where human rights and its diverse ethnic and religious plurality is accommodated, respected and reflected politically.

And it is this: the Rohingya Muslim minority numbering around 1 million were denied the right to vote or stand for office, following a recent census, which excluded all Rohingya. Couple this with recent in-depth reports from Queen Mary University and Fortify Rights and the Yale Law School finding that the process of genocide is under way against the Rohingya. The QMU report concludes

“the Rohingya have suffered the first four of the six stages of genocide. They have been, and continue to be, stigmatized, dehumanised and discriminated against. They have been harassed, terrorized and slaughtered. They have been isolated and segregated into detention camps and securitised villages and ghettos. They have been systematically weakened through hunger, illness, denial of civil rights and loss of livelihood.” This puts them at serious risk of stage five which is “mass annihilation”.


The report is endorsed by Tomás Ojea Quintana, former Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Myanmar (2008-14). Earlier in 2013, a Human Rights Watch Report titled: ‘All You Can Do is Pray’ had concluded, with the help of detailed satellite imagery, the treatment of Rohingya met the legal definition of ethnic cleansing.


Full article: https://zcomm.org/znetarticle/can-democracy-and-genocide-co-exist-in-burma/

Suffering too real in Syria, E. Ukraine, you learn to value compassion

RT reporter Roman Kosarev, who was recently caught in shelling in Syria, says the atrocities he has seen at hotspots such as Syria and Eastern Ukraine have at times rendered him speechless, but this is also where unprecedented compassion can be found.


I was reporting on the terrible killings of civilians in eastern Ukraine for about a year and a half. Now I am doing the same in Syria, but I want to talk about Donbass, where the overwhelming majority speak Russian and where you always feel a bit surreal – you are in a different country, but everything around seems so familiar.

These are real people and it is real death. Thousands of innocent people have died. Children and adults have lost their lives in the most barbaric way. These were boys playing soccer on the school field – they got blown into pieces by mortar fire. Or an elderly couple who were putting meat on the grill and got killed in an instant by a shell that hit their house. These are many people who lost their children or parents because of this undeclared war and now have to live with this nightmare for the rest of their lives.

These are all known facts, but what many people don’t know is that in the midst of this daily hell, human kindness and the unwavering will to live in peace prevail. Not every Russian family has been affected by the horrors of war. Most people know about it from daily news programs - they think of it as something that is only possible somewhere far-far away, not in their own world. But it doesn’t mean that they are indifferent towards the suffering of the people. We’ll come back to this later.


The shock from what I saw lasted shorter with every new shell-ridden district I visited. Tears would dry up in several minutes when I took the mic and tried to show how low humans can fall once they lose their moral values. It may well be that these scatterbrained gunners were not aware of their actual targets, but what could have been on the mind of a soldier who shot dead at point blank range an 18-year-old pregnant girl with her hands tied behind her back? What substance was he under the influence of when he buried her together with other victims near his base?


https://www.rt.com/news/323465-kosarev-ukraine-syria-atrocities/

Aung San Suu Kyi: Myanmar’s New “Democratic Dictator”

By Tony Cartalucci, Land Destroyer Report
Global Research
Tuesday, Nov 24, 2015

Suu Kyi disenfranchised a million voters before elections, and has declared herself above the constitution afterwards. What about that seems “democratic?”

The Western media is portraying Myanmar’s recent elections as historic. One commentator described Myanmar as an “exuberant nation prepared for a new era of democracy and political freedom.” But one wonders what sort of democracy and political freedom can be borne of elections in which nearly a million voters were banned from casting their ballots and with the apparent victor already declaring herself above the law.


This is in part due to the fact that Suu Kyi herself, along with the NLD she leads and a vast network of supporting “civil society” nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) have all been created and sustained annually by billions of dollars worth of backing from the United States and United Kingdom for years. In exchange for this support, Suu Kyi’s long-standing proclivity toward “foreign investment” will lead to the wholesale feeding of Myanmar’s nationalized resources, industry, and infrastructure into the maw of the Wall Street corporations and institutions that have long underwritten Suu Kyi’s rise to power.


“Democracy,” But Only When Convenient
In reality, Suu Kyi and her NLD’s supporters helped disenfranchise nearly a million Rohingya from voting even before the elections took place. Through widespread protests and threats of violence if their demands that the Rohingya remain stripped of their voting rights were not met, the ruling military-led government backed down from a scheme to grant the Rohingya minority long-sought after rights, including the ability to vote.


More than one million Rohingya live in Myanmar, but they are not regarded as citizens by the government.


Myanmar may believe it has shed dictatorship in recent elections, but it is clear they have only replaced one of local and very limited means, with one backed by immense foreign interests bringing with them centuries of experience in emptying out the wealth of other nations – including at one point in the past, Myanmar itself.


Full article: http://axisoflogic.com/artman/publish/Article_72254.shtml

http://www.democraticunderground.com/1016136465

Bumping this d/t the Myanmar election results .......

hoping they will finally be recognized and afforded legal protection. (edit: it looks like nothing has changed).

The Boat Of Starving Rohingya Refugees That No Country Will Take In

The emaciated faces of hundreds of refugees found adrift in Thai waters on Thursday spoke volumes about the scale of the humanitarian crisis unfolding in South Asia.

Reporters on Thursday found about 400 refugees from Myanmar's Muslim Rohingya minority crammed aboard a wooden fishing boat in the Andaman Sea, desperate for food and water.

The refugees said they had been at sea for almost three months and had fled persecution in their home country. They had hoped to reach Malaysia but were turned away by Malay authorities. Six days ago, smugglers abandoned their ship, and ten people had already perished onboard, refugees said.

Christophe Archambault, a photographer for Agence France Presse, captured the harrowing scenes onboard the ship, and the desperate scramble for supplies that were eventually dropped by the Thai military.


?2
Rohingya refugees are pictured on a boat off the southern Thai island of Koh Lipe in the Andaman Sea on May 14, 2015.

Aid groups say at least 6,000 refugees -- and perhaps many times that number -- have been drifting for days and months in the waters between Thailand, Indonesia and Malaysia. They were abandoned with little food and water by human traffickers after a regional crackdown on smuggling networks. Most are Rohingya Muslims who are stateless in Myanmar and Bangladeshis trying to escape poverty.

?2
Rohingya migrants sit on a boat drifting in Thai waters off the southern island of Koh Lipe, May 14, 2015.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/05/14/boat-people-photos_n_7283178.html?ir=WorldPost


The Rohingya - Adrift on a Sea of Sorrows

By Eric Margolis

May 31, 2015 "Information Clearing House" - When is genocide not really genocide? When the victims are small, impoverished brown people no wants or cares about – Burma’s Rohingya.

Their plight has finally commanded some media attention because of the suffering of Rohingya boat people, 7,000 of whom continue to drift in the waters of the Andaman Sea without food, water or shelter from the intense sun. At least 2,500 lucky refugees are in camps in Indonesia.

Mass graves of Rohingya are being discovered in Thailand and Burma (Myanmar). Large numbers of Rohingya are fleeing for their lives from their homeland, Burma, while the world does nothing. Burma is believed to have some 800,000 Rohingya citizens.

This week, the Dalai Lama and other Nobel Peace Prize winners call on Burma and its much ballyhooed ‘democratic leader,’ Aung San Suu Kyi, to halt persecution of the Rohingya. They did nothing.


Full article: http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article42008.htm

?itok=MwUi9KOJ
More than 100,000 Rohingyas tried to escape Burma on boats in the last year. (Photo/endgenocide.org)


Thailand wants no Rohyingas; Indonesia says only a few thousand on a temporary basis. Australia, which is not overly fond of non-whites, say no. Bangladesh can’t even feed its own wretched people. So the poor Rohyingas are a persecuted people without a country, adrift on a sea of sorrows.

What of the Muslim world? What of that self-proclaimed “Defender of the Faith. Saudi Arabia?” The Saudis are just buying $109 billion worth of US arms which they can’t use, but they don’t have even a few pennies for their desperate co-religionists in the Andaman Sea. The Holy Koran enjoins Muslims to aid their brethren wherever they are persecuted – this is the true essence of jihadism.

But the Saudis are too busy plotting against Iran, bombing Yemen, and supporting rebels in Iraq and Syria, or getting ready for their summer vacations in Spain and France, to think about fellow Muslims dying of thirst. Pakistan, which could help, has not, other than offering moral support. Neither has India, one of the world’s leading Muslim nations.

In the end, it may be up to the United States to rescue the Rohyinga, just as it rescued Bosnia and Kosovo. That’s fine with me. I don’t want the US to be the world’s policeman; I want it to be the world’s rescuer, its SOS force, its liberator.

We should tell Burma to halt its genocide today, or face isolation and sanctions from the outside world.


http://www.commondreams.org/views/2015/05/30/rohingya-adrift-sea-sorrows



Mass graves of Rohingya Muslim migrants found in abandoned jungle camps in Malaysia

AGENCY Sunday 24 May 2015

Malaysian police have discovered mass graves in more than a dozen abandoned camps used by human traffickers on the border with Thailand, where Rohingya Muslims fleeing Myanmar have been held.

"These graves are believed to be a part of human trafficking activities involving migrants," Home Minister Zahid Hamidi told reporters.

He did not say how many bodies have been recovered.

The Malaysian newspaper The Star has reported that as many as 100 bodies were found at one camp.

Similar camps and dozens of remains were recovered in jungle camps across the border in Thailand earlier this month, where Rohingya fleeing persecution in Myanmar had been held by traffickers until their families could pay for their freedom.


Full article: http://world.einnews.com/article/267110665/j47hG4-1JDja11R7


Thousands of Rohingya Migrants Remain Stranded at Sea



Published 16 May 2015

“What we have now is a game of maritime Ping-Pong,” says the IOM, as several countries have now denied entry to thousands of migrants.

Hundreds of Rohingya migrants fleeing violence in Myanmar remain stranded at sea on rickety fishing boats as neighboring countries refuse to allow them onto their territory, in what the UN has labelled “maritime Ping-Pong with human life.”

Thailand is the latest country to refuse entry to the migrants. After Thai officials offered a boat load of people food and water Friday, they then assisted the boat's departure farther out to sea.

The migrants have been at sea for weeks, and facing an increasingly desperate situation since they are believed to have very little food or water and are living in cramped and unsanitary conditions. Anywhere from 6,000 to 20,000 migrants are thought to be stranded on various boats, with hundreds piled into each vessel.

A wooden, green and red fishing boat carrying several hundred people was spotted Thursday adrift between Thailand and Malaysia.

Full article: http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Thousands-of-Rohingya-Migrants-Remain-Stranded-at-Sea-20150516-0011.html

"The Rohingya people - often described as one of the most persecuted people on earth"


Rohingya and the Burmese Generals


How to Forge a Democracy and Get Away with It

by Ramzy Baroud / November 18th, 2015

The Rohingya population of Arakan, estimated at nearly 800,000, subsist between the nightmare of having no legal status (as they are still denied citizenship), little or no rights and the occasional ethnic purges carried out by their neighbors. While Buddhists also paid a price for the clashes, the stateless Rohingya, being isolated and defenseless, were the ones to carry the heaviest death toll and destruction.


One of these nationalist groups is the Arakan National Party (ANP), which has incited and enacted violent pogroms against the Rohingya for years. In fact, ethnically cleansing the Rohingya is a main rally cry for a group which now has a democratically elected 29 national level representatives in Rakhine, and is also in “decisive control of the state’s regional assembly,” according to Reuters.

The sad fact is that much of the reporting on the Burmese elections stoked false hope that a democracy has finally prevailed in that country, and either brushed over or completely ignored the plight of the Rohingya altogether.



With Burma climbing to the world top five countries in terms of proven oil and gas reserves, terms such as genocides, military juntas and human rights are abruptly and largely omitted from the new discourse.

Indeed, a whole new narrative is being conveniently drafted, written jointly by the Burmese army, nationalist parties, Aung San Suu Kyi’s NLD, western investors and anyone else who stands to benefit from the treasures of one of the world’s worst human rights violators.


http://dissidentvoice.org/2015/11/rohingya-and-the-burmese-generals/#more-60522

Well, so much for hoping for change with the recent election.

Can democracy and genocide co-exist in Burma?

By Murtaza Shaikh
Source: open democracy
November 30, 2015

We have witnessed a momentous and historic event in Burma (Myanmar); the first real glimpses of democracy with the military dictatorship making way for the landslide victory of Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, Aung San Suu Kyi after over two decades of political exile at an immeasurable personal cost.

However, there is a story behind the headlines and jubilation, to a large extent sidelined and omitted, perhaps because it inconveniently complicates and even undermines the simplistic narrative of democratic triumph over dictatorship, of absolute good overcoming absolute evil. That barely visible story, rather than a minor detail, demands our full attention, especially if the purpose behind the electoral exercise was a future democratic Burma, where human rights and its diverse ethnic and religious plurality is accommodated, respected and reflected politically.

And it is this: the Rohingya Muslim minority numbering around 1 million were denied the right to vote or stand for office, following a recent census, which excluded all Rohingya. Couple this with recent in-depth reports from Queen Mary University and Fortify Rights and the Yale Law School finding that the process of genocide is under way against the Rohingya. The QMU report concludes

“the Rohingya have suffered the first four of the six stages of genocide. They have been, and continue to be, stigmatized, dehumanised and discriminated against. They have been harassed, terrorized and slaughtered. They have been isolated and segregated into detention camps and securitised villages and ghettos. They have been systematically weakened through hunger, illness, denial of civil rights and loss of livelihood.” This puts them at serious risk of stage five which is “mass annihilation”.


The report is endorsed by Tomás Ojea Quintana, former Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Myanmar (2008-14). Earlier in 2013, a Human Rights Watch Report titled: ‘All You Can Do is Pray’ had concluded, with the help of detailed satellite imagery, the treatment of Rohingya met the legal definition of ethnic cleansing.


Full article: https://zcomm.org/znetarticle/can-democracy-and-genocide-co-exist-in-burma/

McRaven’s delusional, dangerous national security strategy

By Robert Jensen

November 29, 2015

Before worrying about whether the extremists in this case, the Islamic State or ISIS, might one day be at our gate, we should reflect on how they got where they already are, in Iraq and Syria. McRaven spent no time in this talk pondering the role of barbaric levels of violence, past and present, used by U.S. military forces and our allies in the region. To assess honestly that history doesn’t justify anyone’s terrorism but simply takes seriously the task of creating the conditions for stability and peace. Anyone wanting to stop brutal attacks on innocents should want to understand the context for the violence.


Although U.S. pundits and politicians like to ignore history that is inconvenient, a sensible policy in the Middle East would recognize how often our policy of undermining democratic regimes and propping up dictatorships has indeed created terrorists. We should recall that our main “enemy” in the region, Iran, suffered under the barbarism of the Shah for more than two decades, a direct result of U.S. support for his tyranny. Meanwhile our key “ally” Saudi Arabia is at the center, both intellectually and financially, of the Islamic fundamentalist political ideology that we claim to be fighting. And our wanton destruction of Iraq in 2003 created the traumatic conditions in which ISIS has flourished.

In these cases, a desire to control the flow of oil and oil profits, not humanitarian principles, dictated U.S. policy. That’s what we mean by imperialism. Throughout the post-WWII period in which the United States has dominated global politics, the United States has consistently ignored the legitimate democratic aspirations of the people of the developing world, including the Middle East, in favor of support for regimes that cooperated with U.S. planners’ goals.

ISIS doesn’t represent those legitimate aspirations, of course, but we aren’t likely to formulate a coherent strategy without an awareness of how the people of the Middle East view the United States. The success of U.S. pop culture around the world—the spread of blue jeans and hip hop music—should not be confused with support for U.S. policies. Even after the abject failures of the invasions and occupations of Afghanistan and Iraq—again, on both principled and pragmatic criteria—U.S. politicians and pundits seem unable to grasp that these failures were tied to the United States’ delusional dreams of dominance. The right strategy is to reverse that course and renounce the unilateralism that folks such as McRaven euphemistically refer to as “leadership.”


Full article: https://zcomm.org/znetarticle/mcravens-delusional-dangerous-national-security-strategy/

Censorship and Control

By Preeti Kaur
Source: teleSUR English
November 29, 2015

India: host to Bollywood, spirituality, and one of the seven ancient wonders of the world. From the snow-dusted Himalayas in the North to the sultry sun-washed beaches, backwaters, and forests of the South, India is a land of abundant beauty. Scattered throughout the country are temples finely carved with depictions of Hindu gods and goddesses. Home to more than a billion people, India “pulsates with a spectacular mix of people, traditions and landscapes,” according to Lonely Planet. Flaunted as a success story of neoliberal development, the economy continues to grow and the state remains stable, despite India being an intensely pluralistic society. More than 700 languages are spoken; Hinduism, Islam, Christianity, Sikhism, Jainism, Zoroastrianism and Judaism are only a sample of the many religions practiced in the country.

However, development has not been equal for all. Many minorities face consistent repression by a strong but violent state. Women of “untouchable” class continue to be subjected to forced sterilization. Protesters and union and other work-place organizers continue to be imprisoned. Indigenous people are violently evicted from their homes to make way for mines and dams. Rising nationalism has even led to the famous Indian cricketer, Amir Khan, to speak out against increasing intolerance.

The levers of power (both regional and national) in India have long been in the hands of a political elite. Political influence is bought by the economically privileged and the result is all too predictable: tax exemptions and havens, land concessions, cheap credit and subsidies on electricity and water for the wealthy; malnourishment, precarious (and often dangerous) work from a young age, and a lack of access to basic healthcare for the poor. Oxfam estimates that if India stemmed the rise in economic inequality, it could end extreme poverty for 90 million people by 2019. Yet, the likelihood of it doing so is slim.

Every year, more than 2,000 farmers in Punjab kill themselves to escape the shame of chronic debt. In the past 20 years, up to 40,000 farmers have taken their lives. Many of their families are left destitute, receiving no state support. Punjab was at the forefront of the Green Revolution, a movement in the 1960s to modernize agriculture with more intensive use of fertilizer and pesticides, and mono-cropping. The Green Revolution has had profound environmental, economic and social consequences.

Pesticides and mono-cropping have depleted micro-nutrients in the soil. Farmers have experienced reduced crop yields, resulting in lower incomes. Large multinational corporations advocated the use of hybrid and GM seeds, which need to be repurchased every year. This has increased costs for farmers. In the past, conventional seeds were harvested for subsequent seasons. Those same pesticides and GM crops were manufactured by the multinationals that lobbied for the Green Revolution. The new agricultural design forced many farmers to turn to credit; firstly to pay for the adaptation to industrial farming and then to help farmers meet their basic needs as crop yields fell.


Full article: https://zcomm.org/znetarticle/censorship-and-control/

The Open Secret of Turkey-Islamic State Group Collaboration

By Yasin Sunca
Source: teleSUR English
November 29, 2015

The expansion of Islamic State group terror is buttressed by the unhesitant support of Turkey, along with some other states.


In this regard, the first aspect of the Kurdish resistance against the Islamic State group vis-a-vis the Turkey-Islamic State group collaboration is that the AKP government carried out a proxy war against Rojava Kurds via the Islamist terror group in order to block or at least contain a Kurdish success in Syria. The AKP government is also responsible for Islamic State group attacks against the Kurds and leftists in Turkey for not conducting an effective investigation despite all the evidences. The Islamic State group carried out three bomb attacks; in Diyarbakır during an electoral rally of pro-Kurdish-Leftist HDP; in Suruç, a town on the Turkey-Syria Border; and in Ankara during a peace march.

The second is that the Kurdish resistance in Rojava unmasked this dirty collaboration, especially during the Kobanê war. In fact, Turkey’s collaboration with and utilization of jihadist groups, particularly against the Kurds, had not started with the Islamic State group and had not come out from nowhere. It has done in the scope of their interventionist approach to the Middle-East and can be dated back to the beginning of 2011 when they supported another jihadist group, the Nusra Front, the Syrian branch of al-Qaida, which is no less cruel than the Islamic State group. Following an internal split within the Nusra Front, it was replaced by the Islamic State group, which has been carrying out attacks on the liberated Kurdish land since then with the help of the AKP government. The AKP-Islamic State group collaboration will continue as long as one needs the other. But there is a balance of terror here for Turkey, created by Turkey: in the case that it stops its collaboration with the Islamic State group, it is quite likely the terror group will turn on them, since the only gate for its logistic needs is the Turkish border.


Turkey is in collaboration with the Islamic State group both politically and ideologically, which expands on many channels as it has been listed with details by David L. Phillips in Huffington Post. The Islamic State group served Turkish interests militarily by fighting the Kurds, while the AKP government facilitated the murderous campaign of the Islamic State group logistically and financially. The AKP government provided military equipments to the group as well. Three trucks full of weapons stopped in Adana region on Jan. 19,2014. Despite the denial of the government, it has been clear that these weapons would be delivered to the Islamic State group. According to many surfaced documents and media coverage, in addition to these three, there were many other trucks of weapons delivered to the Islamic State group, which were also supported by videos and photos taken by Kurdish YPG and YPJ fighters. Moreover, Turkish soil was used by Saudis for the transportation of arms to the Islamic State group.

The AKP government has also facilitated the border crossing of newly recruited Islamic State group members according to a document signed by Interior minister of the time Muammer Güler on June 13, 2014. It has also been asserted by international media that the Erdogan government has turned a blind eye to the “gateway to jihad” through the country’s border with Syria. Many official amendments and questions in the Parliament of Turkey issued by opposition parties for the official answer of the government concerning the facilitation of border-crossing for jihadists remained unanswered. Among many other unanswered questions, HDP Member of Parliament Ibrahim Ayhan tabled a question for the interior minister if the the government provided Islamic State group members with shelter in the refugee camp in Akçakale district.

Islamic State group fighters, including high ranking commanders, received medical care and were treated in the hospitals of the border cities of Turkey. Turkish journalist Fehim Taştekin claims that the government allowed the purchase and the sale of oil from the territory occupied by the Islamic State group. Moreover, according to other sources, some of President Erdoğan’s family members are involved in the trade of Islamic State group oil.


Full article" https://zcomm.org/znetarticle/the-open-secret-of-turkey-islamic-state-group-collaboration/

So, it's only whites who care about economic issues?

Should talk about racial issues exclude economics?

I think this wise man would prove your theory wrong:

Everything Americans Think They Know About Drugs Is Wrong: A Scientist Explodes the Myths

Columbia University scientist Dr. Carl Hart combines research and anecdotes from his life to explain how false assumptions have created a disastrous drug policy.

By Kristen Gwynne / AlterNet June 13, 2013


What many Americans, including many scientists, think they know about drugs is turning out to be totally wrong. For decades, drug war propaganda has brainwashed Americans into blaming drugs for problems ranging from crime to economic deprivation. In his new book High Price: A Neuroscientist's Journey of Self-Discovery That Challenges Everything You Know About Drugs and Society, Dr. Carl Hart blows apart the most common myths about drugs and their impact on society, drawing in part on his personal experience growing up in an impoverished Miami neighborhood. Dr. Hart has used marijuana and cocaine, carried guns, sold drugs, and participated in other petty crime, like shoplifting. A combination of what he calls choice and chance brought him to the Air Force and college, and finally made him the first black, tenured professor of sciences at Columbia University.




Kristen Gynne: What are some of the false conclusions about drugs you are challenging?:

KG:You talk about how people are always blaming problems on drugs, when those issues really spring from the stress of poverty. What are some examples?:

KG:What kinds of environmental factors matter?

CH: ..... If you have competing reinforcers or alternatives, like the ability to earn income, learn a skill, or receive some respect based on your performance in some sort of way, those things compete with potentially destructive behavior. And so as a psychologist, you just want to make sure people have a variety of potential reinforcers. If you don't have that, you increase the likelihood of people engaging in behaviors that society does not condone.

Skills that are employable or marketable, education, having a stake or meaningful role in society, not being marginalized—all of those things are very important. Instead of ensuring that all of our members have these things, our society has blamed drugs, said drugs are the reasons that people don't have a stake in society, and that's simply not true.


KG:What is actually responsible for problems often linked to drugs?

CH: Poverty. And there are policies that have played a role, too. Policies like placing a large percentage of our law enforcment resources in those communities, so that when people get charged with some petty crime, they have a blemish on their record that further decreases their ability to join mainstream, get a job that's meaningful, and that sort of thing.


KG:What would policy that reflects reality look like, and how do we get there?

CH: That is complex, but quite simple to start. The first thing is we decriminalize all drugs. More than 80% of people arrested for drugs are arrested for simple possession. Wen you decriminalize, now you have that huge number of people—we're talking 1.5 million people arrested every year—that no longer have that blemish on their record. That increases the likelihood that they can get jobs, participate in the mainstream........


Full article: http://www.alternet.org/drugs-addiction?sc=fb


I doubt very much you speak for all blacks. And if you really do, you're doing millions a disservice when you want to make the issue of poverty something to be laughed at or ignored.


http://www.democraticunderground.com/1016132112


1904-1924 'The North American Indian' One man's vision of a continent of cultures

by Alex Q. Arbuckle

Born on a Wisconsin farm in 1868, Edward Sheriff Curtis grew up to become a commercial photographer in Seattle. In 1895 he photographed Princess Angeline, the daughter of the Duwamish chief Seattle, for whom the city was named.

That encounter sparked Curtis' lifelong fascination with the cultures and lives of Native American tribes. He soon joined expeditions to visit tribes in Alaska and Montana.

In 1906, Curtis was approached by wealthy financier J.P. Morgan, who was interested in funding a documentary project on the indigenous people of the continent. They conceived a 20-volume series, called The North American Indian.

With Morgan’s backing, Curtis spent more than 20 years crisscrossing North America, creating over 40,000 images of more than 80 different tribes. He made thousands of wax cylinder recordings of native songs and language, and wrote down oral histories, legends and biographies.



c. 1910
A Jicarrilla girl.


1914
Kwakiutl people in canoes in British Columbia.


c. 1910
An Apache woman reaps grain.

The passing of every old man or woman means the passing of some tradition, some knowledge of sacred rites possessed by no other...Consequently the information that is to be gathered, for the benefit of future generations, respecting the mode of life of one of the great races of mankind, must be collected at once or the opportunity will be lost for all time.
EDWARD S. CURTIS


http://mashable.com/2015/11/25/edward-curtis-native-americans/?utm_cid=mash-com-fb-main-link#689xfJAoakqa
Gorgeous photos.

This is How You Stay Focused

By Cynthia Peters

November 26, 2015

Two more young men were shot in my neighborhood last night. Last week, another unarmed black man was killed by police. Last month, a woman in Ohio whose fetus would have been stillborn had to drive 300 miles to get an abortion. The U.S. has the highest GDP in the world, but women who live here rank an abysmal 28th according to the World Economic Forum’s global gender gap index. Even more shocking: the U.S. is home to one tenth of the world’s poorest people, according to the recently released Global Wealth Databoook 2015. “That seems impossible,” says Paul Buchheit on Inequality.org. “It requires a second look at the data, and then a third look. But it’s true. In the world’s poorest decile (bottom 10%), one out of ten are Americans… Incredibly, then, nearly 50 million of America’s 243 million adults are part of the world’s poorest 10%.”

While the world paused to grieve terrorist attacks by ISIS last week, U.S. weapons manufacturers took it as a green light to shore up new contracts and add to their enormous profits and the U.S. House of Representatives exploited the moment to push through racist and xenophobic policies that would exclude certain refugees from entering the U.S. Meanwhile a prime source of terrorist attacks, the U.S. government itself, continued its many decades of state-sponsored terrorism, making us what Noam Chomsky calls the “http://inthesetimes.com/article/17311/noam_chomsky_the_worlds_greatest_terrorist_campaign” To know what it means in human terms, consider the words of former Air Force pilot and drone operator Brandon Bryant who said in an interview on Democracy Now, “I killed 13 people, and only three of them were actual combatants.” He goes on: “I didn’t really understand what it meant to kill at first. It was horrible. The first time was horrible. The second time was horrible. The third time was numbing. The fourth time was numbing. But, of course, the first time sticks with you the longest.”

The victims of his attack are of course not here to tell us how they feel.

Most of us are not former drone operators, but we all have something in common with Brandon Bryant. We watch what our country does to its own people and to others abroad, and we start to feel numb. How can we stay tuned in to all these atrocities? How can we respond in responsibly?:
...........

https://zcomm.org/znetarticle/this-is-how-you-stay-focused/
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