HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » formercia » Journal
Page: 1

formercia

Profile Information

Name: Maybe Later
Gender: Male
Hometown: Downeast/Acadia, Maine
Home country: USA
Current location: Maine
Member since: Sun May 22, 2005, 12:34 PM
Number of posts: 18,479

About Me

Anything you would like to know, just ask. I don't bite.

Journal Archives

Ever wonder what's in Fracking Fluid?

Even the people drilling the Wells wonder. In fact, they really don't know exactly, that's why it's a secret formula that they won't divulge.

This past Weekend, I had the chance to talk with an Engineer that works in the Petroleum Industry. We got on the subject of Fracking and why the Oil Companies won't divulge the formula." It's Refinery Waste" he told me. The nasty leftovers from refining Crude Oil into Gasoline and other useful products. It's the dregs that are too toxic, expensive to process or burn off that need to be disposed of somewhere. Those Gas Wells are not much more than sites for disposal. One of these Days, those toxins are going to migrate into the Water Table and poison a lot of people. Big Oil doesn't care, They paid off the Politicians who then passed Laws that grant them Immunity with no requirements for disclosure.

We have been Fucked in the worst possible way.

NYPD Officer Indicted After Investigation of NPPA Member’s Unlawful Arrest







August 28th, 2013 by Wills Citty and tagged New York City, New York Times, NYPD, occupy wall street, Officer Michael Ackermann, Robert Stolarik
An NYPD officer accused of roughing up and illegally arresting a New York Times photographer has been indicted on multiple charges stemming from an incident last August. Robert Stolarik, an NPPA member, was violently accosted and taken into custody while photographing Officer Michael Ackermann who was trying to arrest a teenage girl in the Bronx.
Officer Ackermann claimed Stolarik hindered police work by repeatedly aiming the flash of his camera at the officer’s face. That story crumbled under investigation by the NYPD Internal Affairs Bureau (IAB). The Bronx district attorney also learned that Stolarik did not have a flash on his camera at the time of the incident, and concluded the officer’s story was a lie. Ackermann now faces three felonies and five misdemeanors, and could see up to seven years in prison if convicted of the most serious charge.
Working with New York Times’ Vice President and Assistant General Counsel George Freeman after the arrest, NPPA General Counsel Mickey Osterreicher sent a letter to NYPD Deputy Commissioner Paul Browne objecting to Stolarik’s unwarranted arrest and rough treatment. Freeman and Osterreicher also requested that the photographer’s equipment and press credentials, both seized at the time of the incident, be immediately returned. In addition the NPPA publicly criticized the NYPD for their actions.
Stolarik’s ordeal was especially troubling because he was arrested in direct violation of NYPD’s own Patrol Guide directives as noted in a follow-up letter from Osterreicher to Browne. Osterreicher also sent a letter to the editor, which was published in the NY Times. In it Osterreicher urged “the New York Police Department to work with us to improve training and supervision for its members.”

--snip--

More at the Link:

http://blogs.nppa.org/advocacy/2013/08/28/nypd-officer-indicted-after-investigation-of-nppa-members-unlawful-arrest/

History is a Weapon



History isn't what happened, but a story of what happened. And there are always different versions, different stories, about the same events. One version might revolve mainly around a specific set of facts while another version might minimize them or not include them at all.
Like stories, each of these different versions of history contain different lessons. Some histories tell us that our leaders, at least, have always tried to do right for everyone. Others remark that the emperors don't have the slaves' best interests at heart. Some teach us that this is both what has always been and what always will be. Others counsel that we shouldn't mistake transient dominance for intrinsic superiority. Lastly, some histories paint a picture where only the elites have the power to change the world, while others point out that social change is rarely commanded from the top down.

Regardless of the value of these many lessons, History isn't what happened, but the stories of what happened and the lessons these stories include. The very selection of which histories to teach in a society shapes our view of how what is came to be and, in turn, what we understand as possible. This choice of which history to teach can never be "neutral" or "objective." Those who choose, either following a set agenda or guided by hidden prejudices, serve their interests. Their interests could be to continue this world as it now stands or to make a new world.
We cannot simply be passive. We must choose whose interests are best: those who want to keep things going as they are or those who want to work to make a better world. If we choose the latter, we must seek out the tools we will need. History is just one tool to shape our understanding of our world. And every tool is a weapon if you hold it right.

http://www.historyisaweapon.com/

Complete text of the NYC Stop and Frisk ruling:


Description
U.S. District Court Judge Shira A. Scheindlin has ruled that the New York City Police Department violated the Fourth and Fourteenth Amendment rights of the plaintiffs because of the way the NYPD has conducted stops and frisks over the past decade.



http://project.wnyc.org/documents/dc.html?doc=750413-floyd-v-city-of-ny-liability

PDF also available.

Let me tell you how it's used.

I had it done to me.

They take the raw Data and make a case against you, not to use in Court, but to create rumor and innuendo, aimed at your Employer, Family, Neighbors, City Officials, Friends (soon to be ex friends), anyone you have contact with that might interact with you, your Bank, Credit Union, Merchants, Doctors, Lawyers, Dentists. Everywhere you go, they are one step behind, with dossier in-hand.
They will make you a Pariah in your Community. If you move away, it starts all over again. They have unlimited resources. They will call on Law Enforcement, the Military, Forest Rangers, whatever it takes to destroy you.

Like the old Skull and Bones admonition: Violate your Oath and you will die Penniless, and without Friends.

They don't give a fuck about the Law.

Do Racism, Conservatism, and Low I.Q. Go Hand in Hand?




Lower cognitive abilities predict greater prejudice through ring-wing ideology.
Published on April 22, 2013 by Goal Auzeen Saedi, Ph.D. in Millennial Media

--snip--

Hodson and Busseri (2012) found in a correlational study that lower intelligence in childhood is predictive of greater racism in adulthood, with this effect being mediated (partially explained) through conservative ideology. They also found poor abstract reasoning skills were related to homophobic attitudes which was mediated through authoritarianism and low levels of intergroup contact.
What this study and those before it suggest is not necessarily that all liberals are geniuses and all conservatives are ignorant. Rather, it makes conclusions based off of averages of groups. The idea is that for those who lack a cognitive ability to grasp complexities of our world, strict-right wing ideologies may be more appealing. Dr. Brian Nosek explained it for the Huffington Post as follows, “ideologies get rid of the messiness and impose a simple solution. So, it may not be surprising that people with less cognitive capacity will be attracted to simplifying ideologies.” For an excellent continuation of this discussion and past studies, please see this article from LiveScience.

Further, studies have indicated an automatic association between aggression, America, and the news. A study conducted by researchers at Cornell and The Hebrew University (Ferguson & Hassin, 2007) indicated, “American news watchers who were subtly or nonconsciously primed with American cues exhibited greater accessibility of aggression and war constructs in memory, judged an ambiguously aggressive person in a more aggressive and negative manner, and acted in a relatively more aggressive manner toward an experimenter following a mild provocation, compared with news watchers who were not primed” (p. 1642). American “cues” refers to factors such as images of the American flag or words such as “patriot.” Interestingly, this study showed this effect to be independent of political affiliation, but suggested a disturbing notion that America is implicitly associated with aggression for news watchers.

Taken together, what do these studies suggest? Excessive exposure to news coverage could be toxic as is avoidance of open-minded attitudes and ideals.  Perhaps turn off the television and pick up a book?  Ideally one that exposes you to differing worldviews.

--snip--

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/millennial-media/201304/do-racism-conservatism-and-low-iq-go-hand-in-hand

The Asshole Song



Gulag Nation USA: 2.3 Million Inmates, Forced Labor, Rancid Food



http://www.alternet.org/print/civil-liberties/gulag-nation-usa-23-million-inmates-forced-labor-rancid-food-and-its-making





Gulag Nation USA: 2.3 Million Inmates, Forced Labor, Rancid Food -- and It's Making the Corporate Overlords Wealthy

March 18, 2013 |



--snip--

The letters that pour into her office are disturbing. Female prisoners routinely complain of being sexually abused by guards. One prisoner wrote to her office: “That was not part of my sentence to perform oral sex with officers.” Other prisoners write on behalf of the mentally ill who have been left to deteriorate in the prison system. One California prisoner told of a mentally ill man spreading feces over himself and the guards then dumping him into a scalding bath that took skin off 30 percent of his body.
Kerness said the letters she receives from prisoners collectively present a litany of “inhumane conditions including cold, filth, callous medical care, extended isolation often lasting years, use of devices of torture, harassment, brutality and racism.” Prisoners send her drawings of “four- and five-point restraints, restraint hoods, restraint belts, restraint beds, stun grenades, stun guns, stun belts, spit hoods, tethers, and waist and leg chains.” But the worst torment, prisoners tell her, is the psychological pain caused by “no touch torture” that included “humiliation, sleep deprivation, sensory disorientation, extreme light or dark, extreme cold or heat” and “extended solitary confinement.” These techniques, she said, are consciously designed to carry out “a systematic attack on all human stimuli.”
The use of sensory deprivation was applied by the government to imprisoned radicals in the 1960s including members of the Black Panthers, the Black Liberation Army, the Puerto Rican independence movement and the American Indian Movement, along with environmentalists, anti-imperialists and civil rights activists. It is now used extensively against Islamic militants, jailhouse lawyers and political prisoners. Many of those political prisoners were part of radical black underground movements in the 1960s that advocated violence. A few, such as Leonard Peltier  and Mumia Abu Jamal , are well known, but most have little public visibility—among them Sundiata Acoli , Mutulu Shakur , Imam Jamil Al-Amin (known as H. Rap Brown when in the 1960s he was the chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee), Jalil Bottom , Sekou Odinga , Abdul Majid , Tom Manning  and Bill Dunne . 

--snip--

Kerness says the for-profit prison companies have created an entrepreneurial class like that of the Southern slaveholders, one “dependent on the poor, and on bodies of color as a source for income,” and she describes federal and state departments of corrections as “a state of mind.” This state of mind, she said in the interview, “led to Abu Ghraib, Bagram and Guantanamo and what is going on in U.S. prisons right this moment.”
--snip--

Federal judge rules surveillance provisions unconstitutional

Source: Yahoo




By Bernard Vaughan | Reuters – 1 hr 31 mins ago



By Bernard Vaughan
NEW YORK (Reuters) - A federal judge has ruled unconstitutional national security provisions that permit federal investigators to access customer information from some companies without court approval.
The provisions "suffer from significant constitutional infirmities," and violate the First Amendment and separation of powers, Judge Susan Illston of the District Court for the Northern District of California wrote in an order on Thursday.
The judge's decision stems from a "National Security Letter" that the Federal Bureau of Investigation issued to an unnamed telecommunications company, according to the Electronic Frontier Foundation.
The National Security Letter provision of the Patriot Act expanded the FBI's authority to demand personal customer records from Internet service providers, financial institutions and credit companies without prior court approval, according to the American Civil Liberties Union.
The letter to the telecommunications company sought "subscriber information" from the company, and warned that the letter's disclosure could result "in a danger to the United States," among other ramifications, according to the decision.

--snip--



Read more: http://news.yahoo.com/federal-judge-rules-surveillance-provisions-unconstitutional-001457869--finance.html 



This is a very big deal.
Go to Page: 1