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Seedersandleechers

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Member since: Tue May 3, 2005, 10:29 AM
Number of posts: 2,737

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“Shadowy” anti-net neutrality group submitted 56.5% of comments to FCC

Source: Arstechnica.com

"A shadowy organization with ties to the Koch Brothers" spearheaded an anti-net neutrality form letter writing campaign that tipped the scales against net neutrality proponents, according to an analysis released today by the Sunlight Foundation.

The first round of comments collected by the Federal Communications Commission were overwhelmingly in support of net neutrality rules. But a second round of "reply comments" that ended September 10 went the other way, with 60 percent opposing net neutrality, according to the Sunlight Foundation. The group describes itself as a nonpartisan nonprofit that seeks to expand access to government records.

The foundation used natural language processing techniques to analyze 1.6 million reply comments.

"In marked contrast to the first round, anti-net neutrality commenters mobilized in force for this round, and comprised the majority of overall comments submitted, at 60 percent," the Sunlight Foundation wrote. "We attribute this shift almost entirely to the form-letter initiatives of a single organization, American Commitment, who are single-handedly responsible for 56.5 percent of the comments in this round."

Read more: http://arstechnica.com/business/2014/12/shadowy-anti-net-neutrality-group-submitted-56-5-of-comments-to-fcc/



Posted by Seedersandleechers | Tue Dec 16, 2014, 10:50 PM (14 replies)

How 'Double Bucks' For Food Stamps Conquered Capitol Hill

The federal government is about to put $100 million behind a simple idea: doubling the value of SNAP benefits — what used to be called food stamps — when people use them to buy local fruits and vegetables.

This idea did not start on Capitol Hill. It began as a local innovation at a few farmers' markets. But it proved remarkably popular and spread across the country.

"It's so simple, but it has such profound effects both for SNAP recipients and for local farmers," says Mike Appell, a vegetable farmer who sells his produce at a market in Tulsa, Okla.

The idea first surfaced in 2005 among workers at the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. They were starting a campaign to get people to eat more fresh produce.


http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2014/11/10/361803607/how-double-bucks-for-food-stamps-conquered-capitol-hill
Posted by Seedersandleechers | Wed Nov 12, 2014, 12:56 PM (2 replies)

When They Brought The Wolves To Yellowstone, They Had No Clue This Would Be The Result

Posted by Seedersandleechers | Wed Nov 5, 2014, 04:47 PM (26 replies)

How the USDA’s new ‘chicken rule’ could change what you eat, and how it’s inspected

Posted by Seedersandleechers | Fri Oct 3, 2014, 12:53 AM (5 replies)

Tasty or addictive? Chinese restaurant serves noodles laced with opium poppy

Hong Kong (CNN) -- The noodles were not just tasty. They were addictive.
A Chinese noodle vendor in northern Shaanxi province has been detained for 10 days after admitting he added powdered poppy plant — from which opium is made --- to his dishes to keep customers coming back, Chinese media has reported.

The owner said that he bought 4 catty (2kg) of the substance for 600 yuan ($98) in August. He said he added it to his food to make it taste better and to improve his business, the Huashangbao paper reported.

Snip:

It added that lacing food with opium poppy was not uncommon in China, with similar cases in 2010 and 2012.

http://edition.cnn.com/2014/09/24/world/asia/china-noodles/index.html?iref=obnetwork

It's the ultimate comfort food.


Posted by Seedersandleechers | Wed Sep 24, 2014, 08:09 PM (5 replies)

Why are shallots so expensive?

Why are shallots so expensive?

$5.95# where I live in the midwest, and it's been expensive for a very long time. I came upon this reply to the question above from yahoo answer and couldn't find any data to back up the notion that growing shallots commercially in the US is illegal.


HALFWAY-to-ITALIA answered 5 years ago

Shallots are more expensive than the regular yellow onion because, truthfully, of politics. As you probably know shallots are not grown in the US for a variety of reasons. The first being they simply do not grow too well here. Second, the commercial growing of shallots is prohibited in the US (I will get to this in a minute) And finally, it is much cheaper to import them from other countries.

As stated, the commercial growing of shallots is prohibited in the US. This is mostly because of the harmful growing conditions of shallots. When sunlight interacts with the roots of the shallot plant, nitrogen dioxide is released into the air (a very small amount) However, when nitrogen dioxide comes into contact with water, hydrochloric acid is formed, which is very dangerous. Now this does not affect the shallot, but the farmers. The danger that is present in the growing of shallots is enough reason for the US to prohibit commercial growing of shallots and for them to be very expensive. I hope I answered your question!
And by the way you can substitute regular yellow onions with shallots, its completely fine.

Have a great day!


Source:

20+ years in the farming industry



https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090930151637AA1uaLy
Posted by Seedersandleechers | Fri Sep 19, 2014, 01:06 PM (8 replies)

Why are shallots so expensive?

$5.95 were I live in the midwest, and it's been expensive for a very long time. I came upon this reply to the question above from yahoo answer and couldn't find any data to back up the notion that growing shallots commercially in the US is illegal.


HALFWAY-to-ITALIA answered 5 years ago

Shallots are more expensive than the regular yellow onion because, truthfully, of politics. As you probably know shallots are not grown in the US for a variety of reasons. The first being they simply do not grow too well here. Second, the commercial growing of shallots is prohibited in the US (I will get to this in a minute) And finally, it is much cheaper to import them from other countries.
As stated, the commercial growing of shallots is prohibited in the US. This is mostly because of the harmful growing conditions of shallots. When sunlight interacts with the roots of the shallot plant, nitrogen dioxide is released into the air (a very small amount) However, when nitrogen dioxide comes into contact with water, hydrochloric acid is formed, which is very dangerous. Now this does not affect the shallot, but the farmers. The danger that is present in the growing of shallots is enough reason for the US to prohibit commercial growing of shallots and for them to be very expensive.
I hope I answered your question!
And by the way you can substitute regular yellow onions with shallots, its completely fine.

Have a great day!




https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090930151637AA1uaLy
Posted by Seedersandleechers | Fri Sep 19, 2014, 01:01 PM (1 replies)

Russell Brand:Why Cameron's Scared Of Scottish Divorce

Posted by Seedersandleechers | Thu Sep 18, 2014, 09:32 PM (6 replies)

James O'Keefe is Getting Desperate as Hell, Part MCMXVII






http://gawker.com/james-okeefe-is-getting-desperate-as-hell-part-mcmxvii-1619338668
Posted by Seedersandleechers | Mon Aug 11, 2014, 12:24 PM (20 replies)

70 years ago today: Anne Frank was captured by the Nazis.




On this day in 1944, German policed discovered the hiding place of Anne Frank and her family in the secret annex of the building where Otto Frank (Anne's father) worked. Following the arrest of the Franks and two other families that were in hiding, Miep Gies collected papers and photo albums left scattered around the living quarters, including Anne's diary. Gies saved them, hoping to return them to Anne after the war.

http://www.motherjones.com/mixed-media/2014/08/anne-frank-captured-nazis-aug-4-1944
Posted by Seedersandleechers | Mon Aug 4, 2014, 05:14 PM (45 replies)
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