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LuckyTheDog

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Member since: Tue Apr 5, 2005, 09:55 AM
Number of posts: 6,774

Journal Archives

Putting carbon dioxide away for good by turning it into stone

We seriously need to do something about carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Besides shifting to renewable energy sources and increasing energy efficiency, we need to start putting some of the CO2 away before it reaches the atmosphere. Perhaps the impacts of human-induced climate change will be so severe that we might even have to capture CO2 from the air and convert it into useful products such as plastic materials or put it someplace safe.

A group of scientists from several European countries and the United States including myself met in the middle, in Iceland, to figure out how CO2 could be put away safely – in the ground. In a recently published study, we demonstrated that two years after injecting CO2 underground at our pilot test site in Iceland, almost all of it has been converted into minerals.

MORE HERE: http://yonside.com/putting-carbon-dioxide-away/


Just speaking for myself here

I wanted Bernie to win. I voted for him. I gave him money. And I talked to other people about him as best I could. But, as has happened with a lot of candidates I have supported over the years, he lost. It happens.

So what will I do now? I will gladly vote for Hillary.

Hillary is not the cranky Jewish grandpa America really needs. Only Bernie can fill those shoes. But, I trust Hillary to responsibly take charge of the nuclear launch codes and nominate sane people to the Supreme Court. These days, that's a win.

So, reluctantly, and while retaining all the affection and admiration I have felt for Bernie, I am ready to say: #ImWithHer.

We can't let the rat bastards win.



President Obama is preparing to endorse Hillary Clinton for president

President Barack Obama is ready to make it official.

With Hillary Clinton close to securing the Democratic nomination for president, Obama is on the verge of formally endorsing his former secretary of state and starting to aggressively make the case against Republican Donald Trump. White House officials say the announcement could come within days, although not before Democrats in New Jersey, California and four other states vote Tuesday in contests expected to solidify Clinton’s claim.

The timeline is likely to hold regardless of how Clinton rival Sen. Bernie Sanders reacts to the Tuesday outcome, the White House said Monday.

Obama called Sanders on Sunday to discuss next steps, according to a Democrat familiar with the call. The Democrat spoke on condition of anonymity because the person was not authorized to discuss the private conversation, and would not reveal any details about it.

MORE HERE: http://yonside.com/president-obama-endorse-hillary-clinton/


What kind of loser will Bernie Sanders be? He’s got three choices

Sanders and his team should take immense pride in what they’ve achieved over the past 12 months. On July 8 2015, the RealClearPolitics polling average had the Vermont Senator on a mere 14.3 percent, almost a full 50 points behind the apparently bulletproof Clinton. To the extent he was noticed at all, Sanders was treated by the press and Clinton supporters as a benign but crusty uncle, well-meaning but toothless.

One year on, Sanders has emerged victorious in more than 20 states, and at one point in April he reduced the gap in that same average to just 1 percent. And those victories are just half the story.

Most importantly, Sanders and his followers have played a role in forcing Clinton to embrace her own progressive instincts rather than taking to the safety of the centre ground. He has also ensured that “socialism” is no longer a taboo word in American politics, at least not in a Democratic primary. Meanwhile, Winnie Wong, the digital strategist behind #FeelTheBern, will probably never want for work again.

Despite all these achievements, Bernie has fallen short. So what should he do now? If we look to the recent past, there are a few well-trodden routes he can take.

MORE HERE: http://yonside.com/kind-loser-will-bernie-sanders-hes-got-three-choices/


Gwynne Dyer: Universal basic income is not crazy and not going away

Another huge chunk of the economy will start shedding jobs rapidly as online health monitoring and diagnosis take over the routine work of non-specialized health professionals. A similar fate awaits most mid-level jobs in the financial services sector, the retail sector and “management” in general.

The standard political response to this trend is to try desperately to create other jobs, even if they are poorly paid, almost pointless jobs, in order to keep people “in work” and off welfare. Unemployment is sees as a failure by both the government and the victim.

Yet this “problem” is actually a success story. Why would you see an economy that delivers excellent goods and services without requiring people to devote half their waking hours to work as a problem? The real problem is figuring out how to distribute the benefits of automation when people’s work is no longer needed.

MORE HERE: http://yonside.com/universal-basic-income-not-crazy/


We’re not going dry: A better way to measure water scarcity

Water crises seem to be everywhere. In Flint, the water might kill us. In Syria, the worst drought in hundreds of years is exacerbating civil war. But plenty of dried-out places aren’t in conflict. For all the hoopla, even California hasn’t run out of water.

There’s a lot of water on the planet. Earth’s total renewable freshwater adds up to about 10 million cubic kilometers. That number is small, less than one percent, compared to all the water in oceans and ice caps, but it’s also large, something like four trillion Olympic-sized swimming pools. Then again, water isn’t available everywhere: across space, there are deserts and swamps; over time, seasons of rain and years of drought.

Also, a water crisis isn’t about how much water there is – a desert isn’t water-stressed if no one is using the water; it’s just an arid place. A water shortage happens when we want more water than we have in a specific place at a specific time.

So determining whether a given part of the world is water-stressed is complicated. But it’s also important: we need to manage risk and plan strategically. Is there a good way to measure water availability and, thereby, identify places that could be vulnerable to water shortages?

MORE HERE: http://yonside.com/better-measure-water-scarcity-2/


Hillary Clinton edges closer to nomination with Puerto Rico win

Hillary Clinton moved to just 20 votes short of securing the Democratic Party's presidential nomination with a win in the US Caribbean territory of Puerto Rico on Sunday.

The victory along with a win Saturday in the US Virgin Islands places Clinton 20 delegates short of the 2,383 she needs to seal the nomination and gives her momentum heading into the final state primaries on Tuesday.

With almost 70 per cent of polling stations counted, Clinton was leading with 59.38 per cent of votes, ahead of Bernie Sanders at 37.53 per cent, according to the latest count on the Democratic Party of Puerto Rico website.

"We just won Puerto Rico!" Clinton tweeted before thanking the "island of enchantment" in Spanish.

MORE HERE: http://yonside.com/hillary-clinton-edges-closer-nomination-puerto-rico-win/


Low-wage America - The women who are taking on Wal-Mart

The labor conditions and free market ideology that today’s low-wage workers are reacting against bear many resemblances to those faced by labor activists a century ago. And the workers involved have played on those historical resonances.

Bangladeshi garment workers invoke the memory of Jewish and Italian immigrant women workers killed in the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire of 1911. Activist fast food workers carry “I am a Man” and “I am a Woman” signs, echoing the Memphis garbage workers strike of 1968. The Pico Wal-Mart workers carried photographs of the Woolworth strikers of 1937 when they sat in at an L.A. Walmart in 2014.

At the same time, this is a 21st-century movement. Activists make use of cellphones and Facebook and Snapchat to organize and publicize their actions.

MORE HERE: http://yonside.com/women-taking-wal-mart/


Poverty, militarism and the public schools

By Robert C. Koehler

What’s the difference between education and obedience? If you see very little, you probably have no problem with the militarization of the American school system — or rather, the militarization of the impoverished schools . . . the ones that can’t afford new textbooks or functional plumbing, much less art supplies or band equipment.

The Pentagon has been eyeing these schools — broken and gang-ridden — for a decade now, and seeing its future there. It comes in like a cammy-clad Santa, bringing money and discipline. In return it gets young minds to shape, to (I fear) possess: to turn into the next generation of soldiers, available for the coming wars.

The United States no longer has a draft because the nation no longer believes in war, except abstractly, as background noise. But it has an economic draft: It claims recruits largely from the neighborhoods of hopelessness. Joining the U.S. military is the only opportunity to escape poverty available to millions of young Americans. We have no government programs to build the infrastructure of peace and environmental sustainability — we can’t afford that, so it has to happen on its own (or not at all) — but our military marches on, funded at more than half a trillion dollars a year, into ever more pointless wars of aggression.

Glory, glory hallelujah. I’d never been to a Memorial Day parade in my life, but I went to this year’s parade in downtown Chicago because members of the Chicago chapter of Veterans for Peace were going to be there, protesting the militarization of the city’s schools.

MORE HERE: http://yonside.com/poverty-militarism-public-schools/


Business groups sue government over Obama administration retirement rule

A coalition of leading business groups announced a lawsuit Thursday aiming to block new regulations set forth this year by the Labor Department. The new regulations are designed to protect retirement savers from conflicts of interest in the market for financial advice.

The group argued the rule would limit the choices available to investors and impinge on the services offered by financial advisors and their firms, reviving a bitter dispute that has followed the rule since it was first proposed in the 2010 Dodd-Frank Act.

“Instead of helping savers plan for retirement, the new rule will unfortunately restrict their access to affordable retirement advice and limit their options for saving,” the group wrote in a joint statement. “The rule will shackle Main Street financial advisors with extensive new requirements and constant liability, forcing them to limit the options and guidance they provide to retirement savers.”

The rule, a top priority of the outgoing Obama administration, requires insurance brokers, retirement advisors and other financial professionals to avoid monetary conflicts of interest when offering financial advice to holders of 401(k)s and individual retirement accounts, or IRAs.

MORE HERE: http://yonside.com/business-groups-sue-retirement-rule-2/


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