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Omaha Steve

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Member since: Tue Nov 9, 2004, 05:03 PM
Number of posts: 41,996

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Heineman (R-NE), Branstad (R-IA) scornful of Medicaid expansion

Source: Omaha World Herald

By Martha Stoddard

LINCOLN — Thousands of the poorest Nebraskans and Iowans could remain without health coverage under a path advocated by the states' Republican governors.

Govs. Dave Heineman of Nebraska and Terry Branstad of Iowa oppose the Medicaid expansion that was written into the federal health care law, and the U.S. Supreme Court's recent ruling on the Affordable Care Act gave states the right to opt out.

The prospect worries advocates in both states.

“It creates a huge gap in terms of making sure everybody has access to coverage,” said Becky Gould, executive director of the Nebraska Appleseed Center for Law in the Public Interest.

FULL story at link.


Read more: http://www.omaha.com/article/20120708/LIVEWELL03/707089929/1685#heineman-branstad-scornful-of-medicaid-expansion

Lest We Forget Jul 2, 1964: Today in Democratic History




And this: http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/johnson-signs-civil-rights-act

President Johnson signs Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

On this day in 1964, U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson signs into law the historic Civil Rights Act in a nationally televised ceremony at the White House.

In the landmark 1954 case Brown v. Board of Education, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that racial segregation in schools was unconstitutional. The 10 years that followed saw great strides for the African-American civil rights movement, as non-violent demonstrations won thousands of supporters to the cause. Memorable landmarks in the struggle included the Montgomery bus boycott in 1955--sparked by the refusal of Alabama resident Rosa Parks to give up her seat on a city bus to a white woman--and Martin Luther King, Jr.'s famous "I have a dream" speech at a rally of hundreds of thousands in Washington, D.C., in 1963.

As the strength of the civil rights movement grew, John F. Kennedy made passage of a new civil rights bill one of the platforms of his successful 1960 presidential campaign. As Kennedy's vice president, Johnson served as chairman of the President's Committee on Equal Employment Opportunities. After Kennedy was assassinated in November 1963, Johnson vowed to carry out his proposals for civil rights reform.

FULL story at link.

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