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HughBeaumont

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Member since: Fri Aug 13, 2004, 03:12 PM
Number of posts: 21,180

Journal Archives

Let’s see . . . .

The average real dollar wage hasn’t been keeping pace with productivity or the cost of living in 32 years . . .

Americans cannot save a dime of their earnings because they have too much month at the end of the money . . .

This year breaks the longest extended period of low top marginal tax rates on the wealthy this century; which, by the way, resulted in the weakest 10 year period of job creation since that statistic's been measured, along with the worst chasm of wealth inequality between the have-too-littles and the have-way-too-damned-muches . . .

Debt and deficits somehow don’t matter when Republicans want to borrow and waste, but any notion of economic repair via spending/influx by a Democratic administration results in fictional cliffs, ceilings and (insert cute prefix here)pocalypses . . .

Back in 1969, an average house cost 1.5 to 2 times as much as an average household income. Now, it’s nearly 3-5 times as much . . .

Corporate America’s response to average Americans getting even one crumb speck of a break in their fiscal situations is to raise prices on everything . . .

We’re expected to fund our educations, our job training, our child care, our health care, our life/auto/home insurance, our retirements, our deaths and our accidents, all while somehow paying for our necessities, which are killing us . . .

Men with 9-to-11-figure net worths and their own planes can somehow spare nearly a half a billion dollars to influence a presidential election but finger-wag heavily at any suggestion of economic fairness towards their workers, stating it will stifle profit, competition and shareholder value . . .

Corporate America will lobby and propagandize the American public on an austerity-stained, faith-based trickle-down model of wealth transfer, when they don’t even practice any such nonsense in their own businesses. . .

Corporate America wants you to continually buy, but doesn’t want to hire you or raise your wage so you can buy . . .

Corporate America expects you to supply them with perpetual productivity and profit, but doesn’t want to give up even one red cent of the spoils when they get it . . .

Corporate America can now get Mom and Dad for the same relative wage as they used to get Mom OR Dad, and both Mom and Dad are now working longer average hours than their 1970s counterparts. To make matters worse, their newly-college-degreed kids live with them and can’t find work because the unable-to-retire Grandparents either have to stay at their jobs until they’re slopped on the gurney or have to take even the entry-level fall-back service jobs so they can eat and get medicine . . .

. . . “Ever get the feeling you’ve been cheated?”

Dish Network, the Meanest Company In America.

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/dish-network-meanest-company-america-194008712.html?page=1

Still, the volume of miserable tales about Dish is impressive; 346 former or current employees had taken the time to write not-so-nice things about the company. On a scale of 1 to 5, they ranked their company an average of 2.2, beating Dillard’s (DDS) and RadioShack (RSH) for the spot at the bottom.

The most common complaints were long hours, lack of paid holidays, and way too much mandatory overtime. Some posts suggest that merely setting foot in Dish’s headquarters is a danger to the soul. “Quit” was the recommendation to one Dish employee who sought management advice. “You’re part of a poisonous environment … go find a job where you can use your talents for good rather than evil.” The roundup noted one other thing: The share price was up more than 30 percent for most of the year.

snip

Ergen founded Dish more than 30 years ago, installing satellite systems with partner Jim DeFranco. Dish is now the second-largest satellite TV provider in the U.S., with 26,000 employees. Ergen, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index, has an estimated net worth of $11 billion. That puts him among the world’s richest men and makes him one of America’s greatest entrepreneurial success stories. He’s also a living rebuke to a library of management textbooks that suggest fostering happy, self-actualized employees in a transparent environment of trust and communal effort is the path to wealth.

Judianne Atencio left Dish not long after. As head of communications for a decade, she had witnessed some of the company’s biggest triumphs, including the successful launch of its satellites and the signing of its 10 millionth subscriber. She had also been around for some of its most crushing defeats, such as Murdoch’s last-minute cancellation of a planned merger and the federal government’s denial of another with competitor DirecTV.

“I didn’t have a life for 10 years,” she says. “I couldn’t even have a dog.” There were times when Ergen screamed so loud at Atencio that she packed up her stuff and had to be persuaded in the parking lot to return to work by an apologetic board member. A friend who had worked in the White House even tried to comfort her by saying, “Charlie’s like Clinton—he only screams at the ones he cares about.”


Charlie Ergen is not the solution. "Charlie Ergen" is the problem.
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