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silvershadow

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Gender: Male
Home country: USA
Member since: Thu Jul 8, 2004, 03:14 PM
Number of posts: 10,187

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A Future to Believe In Anaheim Rally on 5/24

A Future to Believe In Anaheim Rally on 5/24

This event is ticketed, please print your confirmation email or have it available on your mobile device upon arrival to the event venue. Admission is first come, first served. Public entrance from Grand Plaza (Hotel Way and Convention Way).

For security reasons, please do not bring bags and limit what you bring to small, personal items like keys and cell phones. Weapons, sharp objects, chairs, and signs or banners will not be allowed through security. Parking available for a fee in lots surrounding the convention center. Use the Anaheim Convention Center Grand Plaza stop on bus routes 4, 5, 18, 19 and 22. Use the Convention Center Arena Bus Station stop on bus route 9. Use the Katella-Convention Center Bus Station stop on bus routes 50 and 83.

DOORS OPEN: 7:00 a.m.
DATE:Tuesday, May 24, 2016

HOST:Bernie Sanders
LOCATION:Anaheim Convention Center, Anaheim Ballroom on 3rd floor (Anaheim, CA)
800 W Katella Avenue
Anaheim, CA 92802

A Future to Believe In East Los Angeles on 5/23

A Future to Believe In East Los Angeles on 5/23
OFFICIAL EVENT
Join Bernie Sanders for a rally in East Los Angeles, California.

This event is free and open to the public, but RSVPs are strongly encouraged. Admission is first come, first served.

For security reasons, please do not bring bags and limit what you bring to small, personal items like keys and cell phones. Weapons, sharp objects, chairs, and signs or banners will not be allowed through security. Public entrance through the Mission Street entrance. Limited parking available on-site. Carpooling and taking public transit is strongly encouraged. Use the Mission/Lincoln Park stop on bus routes 78, 79 and 378; or the San Pablo St and E Valley Blvd stop on bus route 76.

DOORS OPEN: 9:00 a.m.
DATE:Monday, May 23, 2016
ADD TO CALENDAR
HOST:Bernie Sanders
LOCATION:Lincoln Park (Los Angeles, CA)
3501 Valley Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90031

A Future to Believe In Santa Monica Rally on 5/23

A Future to Believe In Santa Monica Rally on 5/23

Join Bernie Sanders for a rally in Santa Monica, California.

This event is free and open to the public, but RSVPs are strongly encouraged. Admission is first come, first served.

For security reasons, please do not bring bags and limit what you bring to small, personal items like keys and cell phones. Weapons, sharp objects, chairs, and signs or banners will not be allowed through security. Cash-only parking is available at the Civic parking lot off of 4th St and Pico Blvd. Use the Santa Monica stop on the metro or take the Santa Monica High School stop on the Big Blue Bus route 7 or 3.

DOORS OPEN:4:00 p.m.
DATE:Monday, May 23, 2016
ADD TO CALENDAR
HOST:Bernie Sanders
LOCATION:Santa Monica High School Football Field (Santa Monica, CA)
601 Pico Blvd
Santa Monica, CA 90405

Oregon superdelegates making Sanders/Clinton choices amid growing unease about system

SALEM — After Bernie Sanders won Oregon's Democratic primary this week, two superdelegates announced they'll back the Vermont senator and one declared support for Hillary Clinton, amid increased discomfort with a system viewed as undemocratic, even among some of the superdelegates themselves.

"Every Democrat I have talked to finds the unpledged delegate system offensive," Larry Taylor said in a telephone interview with The Associated Press. He became a superdelegate because of his position in the Democratic party in Oregon, but that doesn't mean he agrees with the system.

After Tuesday's primary results came in, Taylor announced he would support Sanders, one of only three superdelegates to do so, with Sen. Jeff Merkley having endorsed Sanders before the primary. Seven have declared they back Clinton. Three remain undeclared.

"I don't think my vote ... should invalidate the vote of thousands of voters," Taylor said. Each delegate vote on the floor of the Democratic convention in July will represent about 8,500 Democrats who voted in the Oregon primary, he noted. He was speaking to AP from Philadelphia, where he and other party officials from Oregon were visiting the convention facilities.




U.S. Rep. Peter DeFazio is unhappy with this system. DeFazio, a superdelegate by virtue of his position as a congressman, is staying out of the fray for now.

"Generally, I do not weigh in on contested primaries, and as long as the race for the Democratic nomination continues, I have no plans to do otherwise," DeFazio said in a statement Wednesday.

He was blunt about his feelings about the superdelegate system, implemented by the Democratic National Committee before the 1984 election to prevent candidates with little chance of winning the presidential election from being chosen as the party's nominee.

"I find the role of superdelegates undemocratic and they should not be a part of the nominating system," DeFazio said. "Instead, I would prefer to let the voters determine the results of presidential primary."



Superdelegate Lupita Maurer came out for Sanders after his win Tuesday, and was delighted to do so.

"I believe I have to represent the majority of voters in Oregon, and so I will vote for him at the convention," she told AP Wednesday.

Maurer, who has dual US-Mexican citizenship, added: "I am from Mexico City, and to me he has done an outstanding job of standing up for the Latino community."

However, she is not a fan of the superdelegate system.

"It's outdated," she said. "We should just get rid of the delegate system completely."

-- The Associated Press


http://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-northwest-news/index.ssf/2016/05/oregon_superdelegates_grapple.html

'This is for Our Families': Children of Striking Verizon Workers Join Picket Line

Published on
Saturday, May 21, 2016
byCommon Dreams

'This is for Our Families': Children of Striking Verizon Workers Join Picket Line

Children marched on the Verizon strike picket lines to call attention to the corporation's "family-devastating proposals"
byNika Knight, staff writer

From Indianapolis to Philadelphia, there were new, younger voices joining the usual chant on the Verizon strike picket lines on Saturday: "What do we want? A contract! When do we want it? Now!"

Children of striking workers joined their parents for 25 nationwide "Family Day" protests organized by the Communications Workers of America (CWA), one of the unions behind the strike.

Holding cotton candy, balloons, and handmade protest signs, the children called for what their parents have asked for from the start: a fair contract, keeping their jobs in their communities, and putting a stop to pension cuts and offshoring of middle-class jobs.

"Despite $1.5 billion in monthly profits and a record $39 billion in profits over the last three years, Verizon is trying to force concessions that would devastate families and kill good jobs," as CWA put it in a statement.

more: http://www.commondreams.org/news/2016/05/21/our-families-children-striking-verizon-workers-join-picket-line

cross-posted to Omaha Steve's Labor group here: http://www.democraticunderground.com/11179249

'This is for Our Families': Children of Striking Verizon Workers Join Picket Line

Published on
Saturday, May 21, 2016
byCommon Dreams

'This is for Our Families': Children of Striking Verizon Workers Join Picket Line

Children marched on the Verizon strike picket lines to call attention to the corporation's "family-devastating proposals"
byNika Knight, staff writer

From Indianapolis to Philadelphia, there were new, younger voices joining the usual chant on the Verizon strike picket lines on Saturday: "What do we want? A contract! When do we want it? Now!"

Children of striking workers joined their parents for 25 nationwide "Family Day" protests organized by the Communications Workers of America (CWA), one of the unions behind the strike.

Holding cotton candy, balloons, and handmade protest signs, the children called for what their parents have asked for from the start: a fair contract, keeping their jobs in their communities, and putting a stop to pension cuts and offshoring of middle-class jobs.

"Despite $1.5 billion in monthly profits and a record $39 billion in profits over the last three years, Verizon is trying to force concessions that would devastate families and kill good jobs," as CWA put it in a statement.

more: http://www.commondreams.org/news/2016/05/21/our-families-children-striking-verizon-workers-join-picket-line

This is a Democratic civil war: The Hillary/Bernie rift cuts to the essence of the party’s soul

SATURDAY, MAY 21, 2016 09:29 AM EDT

This is a Democratic civil war: The Hillary/Bernie rift cuts to the essence of the party’s soul

Are the Democrats a modern corporate party, or one for the people? The "limousine liberal" debate still matters

STEVE FRASER

Trying in vain to derail the Donald Trump locomotive, his Republican Party opponents tarred him with the most toxic political metaphor of the last half century: he was, they claimed, a limousine liberal.

Hillary Clinton has borne that stigma through a good part of her political career. She will undoubtedly confront that charge again in the fall should she be the Democratic nominee. Even socialist Bernie Sanders has been depicted as the voice of well-heeled “limousine liberals and Mercedes Marxists.” How to sort this out?

Nowadays we assume that a limousine liberal is almost by definition a Democrat, so why did Trump hear the criticism? Actually, however, the first politician to suffer that sobriquet was a Republican. Back in 1969 the then-comptroller of New York City, a long-since forgotten Democratic Party apparatchik named Mario Procaccino, was running against the city’s sitting Republican mayor, John Lindsay. Procaccino called out Lindsay as a “limousine liberal.” He meant that Lindsay was to the manor born, raised on Park Avenue, tutored at the toniest preparatory schools, a graduate of Yale, formerly employed by a white-shoe law firm, and a past congressman from the nation’s richest congressional district, known as the “silk stocking district” on Manhattan’s Upper East Side.

Despite these credentials — which normally would have constituted the résumé of a staunch defender of the status quo — Lindsay belonged instead to a breed of subversive elitists, determined to undermine the traditional order of things. They championed the civil rights revolution, advocated a war on poverty, undermined the war on communism abroad, disrespected the mores and moral strictures governing the family, sexual relations and cultural propriety in general, and could care less about the dilemmas facing white working and lower middle-class Americans, Procaccino’s people from the outer boroughs. While these purported reformers pretended to succor the poorest, they really meant for working people to bear the costs, while they remained insulated from any real contact with poverty, crime and the everyday struggle to get by, living in their exclusive neighborhoods, sending their children to private prep schools, sheltering their capital gains and dividends from the taxman, and getting around town in limousines, not subway cars.

more: http://www.salon.com/2016/05/21/this_is_a_democratic_civil_war_the_hillarybernie_rift_cuts_to_the_essence_of_the_partys_soul/

This is a Democratic civil war: The Hillary/Bernie rift cuts to the essence of the party’s soul

SATURDAY, MAY 21, 2016 09:29 AM EDT

This is a Democratic civil war: The Hillary/Bernie rift cuts to the essence of the party’s soul

Are the Democrats a modern corporate party, or one for the people? The "limousine liberal" debate still matters

STEVE FRASER

Trying in vain to derail the Donald Trump locomotive, his Republican Party opponents tarred him with the most toxic political metaphor of the last half century: he was, they claimed, a limousine liberal.

Hillary Clinton has borne that stigma through a good part of her political career. She will undoubtedly confront that charge again in the fall should she be the Democratic nominee. Even socialist Bernie Sanders has been depicted as the voice of well-heeled “limousine liberals and Mercedes Marxists.” How to sort this out?

Nowadays we assume that a limousine liberal is almost by definition a Democrat, so why did Trump hear the criticism? Actually, however, the first politician to suffer that sobriquet was a Republican. Back in 1969 the then-comptroller of New York City, a long-since forgotten Democratic Party apparatchik named Mario Procaccino, was running against the city’s sitting Republican mayor, John Lindsay. Procaccino called out Lindsay as a “limousine liberal.” He meant that Lindsay was to the manor born, raised on Park Avenue, tutored at the toniest preparatory schools, a graduate of Yale, formerly employed by a white-shoe law firm, and a past congressman from the nation’s richest congressional district, known as the “silk stocking district” on Manhattan’s Upper East Side.

Despite these credentials — which normally would have constituted the résumé of a staunch defender of the status quo — Lindsay belonged instead to a breed of subversive elitists, determined to undermine the traditional order of things. They championed the civil rights revolution, advocated a war on poverty, undermined the war on communism abroad, disrespected the mores and moral strictures governing the family, sexual relations and cultural propriety in general, and could care less about the dilemmas facing white working and lower middle-class Americans, Procaccino’s people from the outer boroughs. While these purported reformers pretended to succor the poorest, they really meant for working people to bear the costs, while they remained insulated from any real contact with poverty, crime and the everyday struggle to get by, living in their exclusive neighborhoods, sending their children to private prep schools, sheltering their capital gains and dividends from the taxman, and getting around town in limousines, not subway cars.

more: http://www.salon.com/2016/05/21/this_is_a_democratic_civil_war_the_hillarybernie_rift_cuts_to_the_essence_of_the_partys_soul/

Why the Democrats’ Platform Actually Matters This Year

Why the Democrats’ Platform Actually Matters This Year

It’s how Hillary and Bernie will make peace.

By Jim Newell

In 2012, Barney Frank, then in his last year in Congress, helped write the Democratic national platform. At least he thinks he did.

“I don’t remember what was in it,” says Frank, who was a member of the platform committee at that year’s Democratic National Convention, “and it wasn’t a very interesting tour of duty.” Describing the platform as the “Miss Congeniality of the convention process,” the former Massachusetts representative says everything besides the nomination of the president and the vice president is just this “Model U.N. kind of stuff.”

“Maybe you are a particularly savvy person,” he adds, “but I can’t remember much that’s been in any platform.”

Four years later, the Democratic primary is slogging toward a conclusion in which the platform will play a significantly larger role—Miss Swimsuit, let’s say. At the moment, Hillary Clinton, a couple of weeks from officially clinching the party nomination, is struggling to unite Democrats around her candidacy. Bernie Sanders, meanwhile, shows no indication that he is excited to throw his support her way once he’s been defeated. He is going to want meaningful concessions about the way the Democratic Party does business, what it believes in, and for whom it acts.

more: http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/politics/2016/05/why_the_democrats_platform_actually_matters_this_year.html

Why the Democrats’ Platform Actually Matters This Year

Why the Democrats’ Platform Actually Matters This Year

It’s how Hillary and Bernie will make peace.

By Jim Newell

In 2012, Barney Frank, then in his last year in Congress, helped write the Democratic national platform. At least he thinks he did.

“I don’t remember what was in it,” says Frank, who was a member of the platform committee at that year’s Democratic National Convention, “and it wasn’t a very interesting tour of duty.” Describing the platform as the “Miss Congeniality of the convention process,” the former Massachusetts representative says everything besides the nomination of the president and the vice president is just this “Model U.N. kind of stuff.”

“Maybe you are a particularly savvy person,” he adds, “but I can’t remember much that’s been in any platform.”

Four years later, the Democratic primary is slogging toward a conclusion in which the platform will play a significantly larger role—Miss Swimsuit, let’s say. At the moment, Hillary Clinton, a couple of weeks from officially clinching the party nomination, is struggling to unite Democrats around her candidacy. Bernie Sanders, meanwhile, shows no indication that he is excited to throw his support her way once he’s been defeated. He is going to want meaningful concessions about the way the Democratic Party does business, what it believes in, and for whom it acts.

more: http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/politics/2016/05/why_the_democrats_platform_actually_matters_this_year.html

Cross-posted to Good Reads: http://www.democraticunderground.com/1016157678
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