HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » n2doc » Journal
Page: « Prev 1 ... 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 ... 1474 Next »

n2doc

Profile Information

Gender: Do not display
Home country: USA
Current location: Georgia
Member since: Tue Feb 10, 2004, 01:08 PM
Number of posts: 43,039

About Me

Environmental Scientist

Journal Archives

Review: ‘Bush,’ a Biography as Scathing Indictment

For George W. Bush, the summer already looks unbearable. The party he gave his life to will repudiate him by nominating a bombastic serial insulter who makes the famously brash former president look like a museum docent by comparison. And a renowned presidential biographer is weighing in with a judgment that makes Mr. Bush’s gentleman’s Cs at Yale look like the honor roll.

If Mr. Bush eventually gets a more sympathetic hearing by history, as he hopes, it will not start with Jean Edward Smith’s “Bush,” a comprehensive and compelling narrative punctuated by searing verdicts of all the places where the author thinks the 43rd president went off track. Mr. Smith’s indictment does not track Donald J. Trump’s, but the cumulative effect is to leave Mr. Bush with few defenders in this season of his discontent.

Mr. Smith, a longtime academic and finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, made a name for himself in part with masterly biographies of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Ulysses S. Grant, offering historical reassessments of underrated presidents who looked better with the passage of time. With “Bush” he sticks to the original conventional assessment, presenting a shoot-from-the-hip Texan driven by religiosity and immune to the advice of people who knew what they were talking about.

...

Mr. Smith leaves no mystery where he stands on Mr. Bush’s place in history. The first sentence of his book: “Rarely in the history of the United States has the nation been so ill-served as during the presidency of George W. Bush.”

more
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/04/books/review-bush-a-biography-as-scathing-indictment.html

China puts finishing touches to world's biggest radio telescope

China has hoisted the final piece into position on what will be the world’s largest radio telescope, which it will use to explore space and help in the hunt for extraterrestrial life.

The Five Hundred Metre Aperture Spherical Telescope, or Fast, is the size of 30 football fields and has been cut out of a mountain in the south-western province of Guizhou.

Scientists would start debugging and trials of the telescope, said Zheng Xiaonian, deputy head of the National Astronomical Observation under the Chinese Academy of Sciences, which built the telescope.

“The project has the potential to search for more strange objects to better understand the origin of the universe and boost the global hunt for extraterrestrial life,” Zheng said, according to the Xinhua news agency.



more
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/jul/03/china-puts-finishing-touches-to-worlds-biggest-radio-telescope

Toon: The Survivor Who Would Not Be Indifferent

toon


How about both!

Friday TOON Roundup 3 - The Rest

Brexit














The Issue





IS


Court


Rights







Charters


Friday TOON Roundup 2 -Investigatin'












Friday TOON Roundup 1 - Orange Fool



















Home Computers Connected to the Internet Aren't Private, Court Rules

A federal judge for the Eastern District of Virginia has ruled that the user of any computer that connects to the Internet should not have an expectation of privacy because computer security is ineffectual at stopping hackers.

The June 23 ruling came in one of the many cases resulting from the FBI's infiltration of PlayPen, a hidden service on the Tor network that acted as a hub for child exploitation, and the subsequent prosecution of hundreds of individuals. To identify suspects, the FBI took control of PlayPen for two weeks and used, what it calls, a "network investigative technique," or NIT—a program that runs on a visitor's computer and identifies their Internet address.

Such mass hacking using a single warrant has riled privacy and digital-rights advocates, but Senior U.S. District Judge Henry Coke Morgan Jr. upheld the use of the warrant and even stated that the warrant is unnecessary because of the type of crime being investigated and because users should have no "objectively reasonable expectation of privacy."

Even using countermeasures, such as the Tor network, does not mean that the user should expect their location or their activities to remain private, according to the judge.

more
http://www.eweek.com/security/home-computers-connected-to-the-internet-arent-private-court-rules.html

CDC issues warning on multidrug-resistant yeast infection

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is warning US healthcare facilities about the emergence of a multidrug-resistant type of yeast that has caused deadly hospital infections in several countries since 2009 but has yet to appear in US patients.

The yeast, Candida auris, has most commonly caused healthcare-associated invasive infections such as bloodstream infections, wound infections, and otitis, and it has typically occurred several weeks into a patient's hospital stay, according to a CDC news release.

The first case was found in a Japanese patient with an ear infection in 2009, and since then C auris cases have been reported in eight other countries, with two unnamed countries reporting healthcare outbreaks involving more than 30 patients each, the agency said.

more
http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspective/2016/06/cdc-issues-warning-multidrug-resistant-yeast-infection

The 6,000-Year-Old Telescope

Telescopes as we know them today trace their origins back to the Enlightenment. The earliest such devices emerged about 400 years ago. But humankind has fashioned environments for stargazing for far longer than that.

Scholars have long speculated about the astronomical orientation of the Pyramids at Giza, for instance, and the possibility that Stonehenge was built to be a celestial observatory.

Now, there’s evidence of ancient telescopic structures that date back even farther, to about 6,000 years ago. Astronomers are exploring ancient tombs in Portugal that they believe may have been used by prehistoric humans to enhance specific views of the night skies. Researchers are focusing on the alignment of the stars with megalithic tombs—stone structures known as dolmens that feature long narrow entrances that act as apertures, essentially zooming in on stars and planets that wouldn’t always be visible from the outside. “These structures could therefore have been the first astronomical tools to support the watching of the skies, millennia before telescopes were invented,” the Royal Astronomical Society wrote in an statement announcing the research on Wednesday.



more
http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2016/06/oldest-telescope/489362/
Go to Page: « Prev 1 ... 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 ... 1474 Next »