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n2doc

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Member since: Tue Feb 10, 2004, 12:08 PM
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Environmental Scientist

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'Extinct' Bird Rediscovered in Myanmar, Surprising Scientists


When scientists heard the call of a Myanmar Jerdon's babbler (above), they quickly recorded it and played the recording back, prompting one of the birds to come investigate.

PHOTOGRAPH BY ROBERT TIZARD, WCS

Christine Dell'Amore
National Geographic
PUBLISHED MARCH 5, 2015

A bird thought to have gone the way of the dodo decades ago has been rediscovered in Myanmar (Burma), scientists reported Thursday.

A team led by the Wildlife Conservation Society stumbled upon the bird, a Myanmar Jerdon's babbler, last May while studying other birds in a small grassland area near an abandoned agricultural research station. (See "Pictures: Extinct Species That Could Be Brought Back.")

Once they heard its distinctive call, the scientists quickly recorded it and played the recording back, prompting an adult Myanmar Jerdon's babbler to come investigate. The team caught the the first known glimpse of the animal since 1941, according to a Thursday press release from the Wildlife Conservation Society.

Over the next two days, the team found several more individuals of the "extinct" bird and took blood samples and high-resolution photographs.

more

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2015/03/150305-birds-extinct-rediscovered-myanmar-burma-animals-science/

When four cops have to use deadly force to subdue a man, something's wrong

By TED RALL

The police shooting of a 39-year-old homeless man in the skid row section of downtown Los Angeles is prompting comparisons and reactions familiar to those that followed police killings of unarmed black men in Ferguson, Mo., and New York. The identity of the man is still not clear, but he was known as "Africa" to some who knew him on the streets.



The incident is still under investigation but many question how dangerous a man without a gun can be to four highly trained law enforcement professionals, all armed. The LAPD says its officers first approached Africa in response to a robbery call, and that its officers shot the man to prevent him from taking one of the officers' guns. The revelation that Africa was a convicted bank robber who served a long prison term seems to bolster the image of a dangerous person. In Ferguson, police also pointed to the victim's alleged involvement in a robbery.

Then there's the context of lousy community relations. "Skid row has been home to police occupation under the Safer Cities Initiative," Steve Diaz, an organizer for the Los Angeles Community Action Network, said at a meeting of the Los Angeles Police Commission's weekly meeting. "They clear people out in the name of gentrification."

Since at least one of the LAPD officers was wearing a body camera, the investigation is also being viewed as a test case for a technology that advocates hope will hold rogue cops accountable and defend honest ones against folks' charges of brutality. The claim of a St. Louis man that a policeman turned off his dashboard cam before beating him, following a similar story in New Orleans late last year, has skeptics wondering whether videotaping really is a solution in such cases.

Maybe it's because I'm old enough to remember domestic policing before it was militarized and excessive force became the norm, but for me this is as much a story about officers who escalate violence far too quickly as it is about other relevant issues, such as racism.

more

http://www.latimes.com/opinion/opinion-la/la-ol-rall-lapd-skid-row-homeless-shooting-20150305-story.html

McConnell Urges Sedition against EPA requirements

WASHINGTON — Senator Mitch McConnell, Republican of Kentucky and majority leader, is urging governors to defy President Obama by refusing to implement the administration’s global warming regulations.

In an op-ed article published Wednesday in The Lexington Herald-Leader with the headline, “States should reject Obama mandate for clean-power regulations,” Mr. McConnell wrote: “The Obama administration’s so-called ‘clean power’ regulation seeks to shut down more of America’s power generation under the guise of protecting the climate.” He added, “Don’t be complicit in the administration’s attack on the middle class.”

As Mr. Obama pushes an aggressive climate change agenda, the Environmental Protection Agency has proposed regulations to slash greenhouse gas emissions from coal-fired power plants, the nation’s largest source of planet-warming pollution. The rules, which the E.P.A. expects to be final this summer, would require each state to submit a plan detailing how it would cut coal-fired power plant pollution. Once implemented, the plans could lead to the closing of hundreds of coal plants, in what the administration says will be a transformation of the nation’s energy economy away from fossil fuels and toward sources like wind and solar.

States that rely heavily on coal production or coal-fired electricity are wary of the plan, which could ultimately freeze demand for coal. Already, 12 states, including Mr. McConnell’s home state, have filed lawsuits opposing the plan and at least a dozen more are expected to file similar suits.

But Mr. McConnell urged governors to fight the regulations by simply refusing to submit their state plans to the federal government.

more
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/05/us/politics/mcconnell-urges-states-to-defy-us-plan-to-cut-greenhouse-gas.html?ref=politics&_r=0

Thursday TOON Roundup 4- The Rest

Putin











Haters








Nut




Court





HRC





Economy


Health





Thursday TOON Roundup 3- Clown Party

















Thursday Toon Roundup 2- Cowardly War Monger























Thursday Toon Roundup 1- Race and injustice












Here’s why gas really costs Americans $6.25 a gallon



It’s almost April 15, and you may be worrying about how much taxes will hurt this year. But a new study published today suggests there’s a whole world of economic losses in the air around us that few of us know anything about.

The study, published in the journal Climatic Change, is the first to pull together a proper accounting of the hidden costs of greenhouse gas emissions. It shows the true (and much higher) cost that we pay in dollars at the pump and light switch—or in human lives at the emergency room.

Drew Shindell, a professor at Duke University, has attempted to play CPA to our industrialized emitting world. He has tabulated what he calls “climate damages” for a whole range of greenhouse gases like CO2, aerosols, and methane—and more persistent ones like nitrous oxides.

If these damages are added in like the gas tax, a gallon of regular in the United States would really cost $6.25. The price of diesel would be a whopping $7.72 a gallon.

more

http://qz.com/355923/if-we-paid-for-the-hidden-cost-of-emissions-gas-would-be-6-25-a-gallon/

We'll let junior pay for it...

Georgia ‘License To Discriminate’ Bill Forced Through Committee During Bathroom Break

Georgia Republicans have used a number of nefarious methods to get their way over the years, but earlier this week they busted out an especially sneaky new tactic: voting on legislation when Democrats are, um, temporarily indisposed.

The incident occurred during a Georgia Senate Judiciary Committee meeting on Monday, where assembled lawmakers discussed a number of proposed laws over the course of the day. Looming over the committee was S.B. 129, a controversial “religious liberty” bill that mirrors the federal Religious Freedom and Restoration Act but that many argue could be used to discriminate against LGBT people. Committee chairman Josh McKoon (R-Columbus) authored the bill, but it is opposed by Democrats such as Vincent Fort (D-Atlanta), who tabled the proposed legislation when it was brought up to the committee last week.

After several hours of deliberations at Monday’s committee meeting, however, the Atlanta Journal Constitution reports that Fort asked McKoon if he could pause work for a moment to use the bathroom. McKoon obliged, but while the Democrat hurried to the lavatory, the rest of the committee — which consisted entirely of Republicans once Fort left the room — quickly pulled the “religious liberty” bill off the table and began voting. A staffer alerted other Democrats who rushed to the scene, but the committee had already passed the bill by the time lawmakers arrived.

“ knew I was going to come back,” Fort told the Constitution. “It seems to me the right thing would have been to delay the vote until all the members who had appeared at the committee were in the room.”

more
http://thinkprogress.org/lgbt/2015/03/04/3629655/georgia-license-discriminate-bill-forced-committee-bathroom-break/

A Symphony for Cats

Have you ever tried grooving with your cat to some song, only to have your feline friend shake you off? Perhaps your pet is apathetic about music. Typical.

But new research shows that cats do enjoy music; just not the stuff humans tend to pick. A team of psychologists at the University of Wisconsin created custom music designed to appeal to cats by mixing beats that fall into the same frequency range that cats use to communicate with one another. The songs also have a tempo similar to the beat that cats purr to. Here's an example, from the researcher David Teie’s website:



When researchers played their songs for 47 different cats, the animals preferred the specially-composed songs to human music, the team reported this week in the journal Applied Animal Behavioral Science. Whenever the researchers played their specially-made songs, some of the cats would rub against the music speakers rather than stand by idly—as they did when Johann Sebastian Bach's “Air on a G String” and Gabriel Fauré's “Elegie” were played.



More samples of the songs are on Teie’s website, where he writes: "Dogs get all the press for their high hearing, but cats win the household pet prize (unless you keep a bat or dolphin in your place). The domestic cat’s hearing range is far above its own vocal range; it uses this ability to hunt for some of its favorite prey. In the next phase of the development of music for cats we will introduce ultrasound music that should be a bit like sonic catnip."


examples at link

http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2015/03/a-symphony-for-cats/386737/
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