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n2doc

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Home country: USA
Current location: Georgia
Member since: Tue Feb 10, 2004, 12:08 PM
Number of posts: 31,402

About Me

Environmental Scientist

Journal Archives

After Nevada ranch stand-off, emboldened militias ask: where next?

By Jonathan Allen

(Reuters) - Flat on his belly in a sniper position, wearing a baseball cap and a flak jacket, a protester aimed his semi-automatic rifle from the edge of an overpass and waited as a crowd below stood its ground against U.S. federal agents in the Nevada desert.

He was part of a 1,000-strong coalition of armed militia-men, cowboys on horseback, gun rights activists and others who rallied to Cliven Bundy's Bunkerville ranch, about 80 miles northeast of Las Vegas, in a stand-off with about a dozen agents from the federal Bureau of Land Management.

The rangers had rounded up hundreds of Bundy's cattle, which had been grazing illegally on federal lands for two decades. Bundy had refused to pay grazing fees, saying he did not recognize the government's authority over the land, a view that attracted vocal support from some right-wing groups.

Citing public safety, the BLM retreated, suspending its operation and even handing back cattle it had already seized.

No shots were fired during the stand-off, which Bundy's triumphant supporters swiftly dubbed the "Battle of Bunkerville," but the government's decision to withdraw in the face of armed resistance has alarmed some who worry that it has set a dangerous precedent and emboldened militia groups.

more

http://news.yahoo.com/nevada-ranch-stand-off-emboldened-militias-ask-where-203201587.html

Protestor? Domestic Terrorist.

How Mississippi Businesses Are Fighting a New LGBT Discrimination Law


Back in February, Arizona Governor Jan Brewer vetoed a bill that would have allowed businesses to "exercise their religious beliefs" by discriminating against LGBT people. Mississippi Governor Phil Bryant, however, proudly put his signature on a similar piece of legislation earlier this month. It will go into effect July 1.

The proponents of Mississippi’s SB2681, the so-called Religious Freedom Restoration Act, claim that it is more narrowly tailored than the controversial Arizona proposal. But civil rights advocates say it clears a path for anti-gay discrimination. "The law could still open the door for someone who wants to use their religion to discriminate against others," according to the Mississippi branch of the ACLU . "Mississippi legislators rejected language that would have explicitly prohibited religion from being used to excuse discrimination."

Many business owners in Mississippi's urban centers are pushing back, saying they want no part of the new law. Mitchell Moore, who owns Campbell’s Bakery in the city’s revitalized Fondren neighborhood, made stickers that local merchants could display in their windows to make it clear how they felt about the bill. "I'm in a business to sell a product, and I want to sell that product to everybody, and I don’t care what you do in your life," Moore told MSNBC.

In Mississippi, with its troubled civil rights legacy, the fight against LGBT discrimination has a special resonance. Cities such as Jackson, gutted by white flight after desegregation, are trying to move forward into a new era by attracting young artists and professionals to move. Neighborhoods like Fondren are coming back, thanks in part to an up-and-coming generation of business owners who are explicitly inclusive of all different types of people.

Working with the LGBT rights group Equality Mississippi, Moore and other business owners designed stickers that say, "We Don’t Discriminate: If You're Buying, We're Selling."

more

http://www.theatlanticcities.com/politics/2014/04/how-mississippi-businesses-are-fighting-new-lgbt-discrimination-bill/8902/

North Dakota Finds Itself Unprepared To Handle The Radioactive Burden Of Its Fracking Boom

North Dakota recently discovered piles of garbage bags containing radioactive waste dumped by oil drillers in abandoned buildings. Now, the state is trying to catch up to an oil industry that produces an estimated 27 tons of radioactive debris from wells daily.

Existing fines have apparently not been enough to deter contractors from dumping oil socks — coiled filters that strain wastewater and accumulate low levels of radiation.

“Before the Bakken oil boom we didn’t have any of these materials being generated,” the state’s Director of Waste Management Scott Radig told the Wall Street Journal. “So it wasn’t really an issue.”

The state is in the process of drafting rules, out in June, that require oil companies to properly store the waste in leak-proof containers. Eventually, they must move these oil socks to certified dumps. However, North Dakota has no facilities to process this level of radioactive waste. According to the Wall Street Journal, the closest facilities are hundreds of miles away in states like Idaho, Colorado, Utah, and Montana.

more

http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2014/04/16/3427345/north-dakota-radioactive-waste-fracking/

Too Big to Jail

By David Cay Johnston


When fraudulent banking nearly sank the global economy in 2008, one former government official knew exactly how to nail the crooks. And he'd already swooped in to clean up a similar mess.

More than two decades ago, during the savings and loan crisis, Bill Black exposed the Keating Five, senators who took big campaign contributions from the most infamous of the savings and loan executives and then tried to hide their crimes by stopping bank examiners from doing their job. The scandal ended the careers of three of those senators. One of them—John McCain—went on to run for president.

Black also helped prosecutors convict more than 3,000 crooked bankers, a third of them high-level executives. He also trained bank examiners and FBI agents in what to look for and showed prosecutors how to frame charges and present complicated evidence to juries in a compelling manner.

After that, Black, a lawyer, got a doctorate in criminology and developed a theory he calls "control fraud" to describe how corrupt bankers turn legitimate institutions into criminal enterprises. He devised techniques to help bank regulators quickly spot crooked banking practices, and rolled all this into a book,The Best Way to Rob a Bank Is to Own One.

more

http://mag.newsweek.com/2014/04/25/financial-crisis-banks.html

Sriracha considers moving factory amid smell complaints

After a months-long battle with the city of Irwindale over complaints about a spicy odor, Sriracha sauce creator David Tran said Wednesday he is now seriously considering moving his factory to another location.

Tran responded Wednesday to the politicians and business leaders from 10 states and multiple cities in California that have offered to host the Sriracha factory. He invited them to tour the facility in Irwindale and decide if their communities would complain about the odors that arise during production.

Tran stressed he has not decided whether to move, but would like to explore his options.

The Irwindale City Council voted unanimously to designate the factory a public nuisance last Wednesday despite promises from the saucemaker that they would submit an action plan and fix the smell by June 1.

more

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-sriracha-may-move-ln-20140416,0,4215015.story#axzz2z9pEM8yo

He'd be smart to move.

Thursday TOON Roundup 3- The Rest




Rancher




Wages












LA






Spy





Teaching



2016



Thursday TOON Roundup 2- Gop'ers gonna goober













Thursday Toon Roundup 1-Haters gonna hate














Bundy the Singing Cowboy

Luckovich Toon: Hank vs. the Trolls

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