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Blue_Tires

Profile Information

Gender: Male
Hometown: VA
Home country: USA
Current location: VA
Member since: 2003 before July 6th
Number of posts: 41,241

About Me

Blocked on Twitter by that rat bastard fuck @ggreenwald

Journal Archives

MEANWHILE, in Japan...



http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-ms8IjdBK7uc/UgbnMsizWeI/AAAAAAAAcCE/x4Kc9IqrdkI/s1600/Kawasaki+OH-1





http://en.rocketnews24.com/2012/10/19/japans-armed-forces-show-their-playful-side-moe-style-attack-helicopter-wows-crowds/

Body found in Southampton Co. ID'd as AJ Hadsell

NORFOLK

Police said the remains discovered near an abandoned house in Southampton County on Thursday were identified as those of Anjelica “AJ” Hadsell, the 18-year-old Longwood University student who went missing last month.

Hadsell’s family and friends were notified before the media was told Friday evening.

Her mother released a statement Friday night.

“Again I would like to express my deepest appreciation for the Norfolk PD, FBI, Search and Rescue, media and public for their superb dedication to this case and finding my daughter AJ,” Jennifer Hadsell wrote. “Please respect this time as we need to release emotionally. Your prayers are appreciated from the public!”

Police would say only that Hadsell’s body had been identified. They did not say whether they suspect foul play or whether there was a suspect in her disappearance.

http://hamptonroads.com/2015/04/body-found-southampton-co-idd-aj-hadsell#


NOTE: This is an update of an earlier story: http://www.democraticunderground.com/10026405084

40 years ago: The last commercial flight out of Da Nang






http://www.airliners.net/aviation-forums/general_aviation/read.main/3946875/

So now it is official -- Snowden has leaked MILITARY intelligence secrets

Everyone saw the USS Annapolis come home last year. It returned, poignantly, on Sept. 11, and there was a seriousness amid the usual dockside fanfare—sailors meeting newborn children for the first time, a school band playing "Anchors Aweigh." But there was no mention of the boat's secret missions.

From March to September 2014, the U.S. submarine's 152-man crew cruised the deeps of the Mediterranean, Red Sea and Arabian Gulf, earning a earning a coveted Battle "E" for their efficiency in doing all the fleet had asked of them. Which involved ... what, exactly? They covered 34,000 nautical miles, participated in one multinational exercise, and made port calls in Portugal, Spain, Bahrain, and Gibraltar, according to official Navy reports.

There was something else, according to the sub's captain, Commander Chester T. Parks. "During this time," he told reporters, "Annapolis completed four missions vital to national security."

Technically, his boat is a fast-attack submarine, responsible for tracking and killing enemy subs and surface ships when shit goes down. But the Annapolis was equipped for a very special top secret task, one that didn't involve its Mark 48 ADCAP torpedoes—or any shooting weapons at all. It was a mission that wasn't yet accomplished as the boat ported and the crew embraced their families on the dock at Submarine Base New London, Conn.

http://phasezero.gawker.com/spying-on-the-u-s-submarine-that-spies-for-the-nsa-and-1693109418


How does an exposure of Naval SIGINT against foreign targets protect my constitutional rights? Anybody wish to answer that?

Anybody want to argue this falls under "whistleblowing in the public interest?"

Correct me if I'm wrong, but hasn't Snowden maintained from the start that he *NEVER* took nor shared any filed related to military intelligence?


This sums it up: https://twitter.com/BradMossEsq/status/586594078671896576

Snowden statue points to divide in US society: Is he hero or traitor?

A group of guerrilla artists' lofty, albeit controversial, goal of enshrining whistle-blower Edward Snowden among the ranks of American heroes was thwarted on Monday as New York City Department of Parks & Recreation officials promptly removed a bust of Mr. Snowden that the artists had installed atop a war memorial in Brooklyn, N.Y.

The group of artists, whose identities have not been confirmed, had fastened a custom-made bust of the former National Security Agency contractor to part of the Prison Ship Martyrs Monument, a memorial to Revolutionary War soldiers. The parks department quickly covered the unsanctioned bust with a tarp and removed it shortly thereafter.

But while the dance of discord played out by the activist artists and park officials may have amused local spectators, it is representative of a divide within American society: the split between those who view Snowden as a national hero and those who believe he is a traitor.

According to a January 2014 poll by the Pew Research Center, while public opinion is divided over whether the Snowden leaks served the public interest, most young Americans are supportive of Snowden.

http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/USA-Update/2015/0407/Snowden-statue-points-to-divide-in-US-society-Is-he-hero-or-traitor-video

Crazy Things Glenn Beck Told Glenn Greenwald

Glenn Greenwald joined Glenn Beck on The Blaze radio hour this morning to discuss the security apparatus of the United States, as well as other topics of current interest, including the passage of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act in Indiana and the administration’s negotiations with Iran.

“Why does Indiana need to be gassed,” Beck asked, “and yet our president is trying to find common ground with Iran?”

“Let me break that down,” Greenwald replied. “First of all, our closest allies are the most repressive regimes on the planet, like Egypt and Saudi Arabia. So the idea that we’re at the table with a repressive regime is nothing new. Iran is a more enlightened progressive regime than our other allies.”

People make a big deal of ‘Death to America!’ chants,” Greenwald said. “But most people understand that rhetoric and actions aren’t the same. Iran can’t impose death on America. The United States took down Iranian government in 1979 — of course they’d be hostile to foreign invading powers.”

http://www.alternet.org/crazy-things-glenn-beck-told-glenn-greenwald

Birds of a feather, and all that....

Revealed: China’s Cyberwar ‘Cannon’

Computer security researchers have discovered a new “offensive device” being used by China’s powerful Internet censors that gives them the power to launch attacks on websites and inject malicious viruses on computers around the world.

The device is associated with China’s so-called Great Firewall, which blocks Internet searches in China for information the government deems controversial, such as from Chinese dissidents and government critics. But this new tool, which researchers dubbed the Great Cannon, actually can commandeer an unwitting person’s computer and marshal it into a network of machines used to flood websites with traffic and force them to shut down.

The cannon was used in such a denial-of-service attack on GreatFire.org, which helps Internet users circumvent Chinese censors, researchers at Citizen Lab, with the Munk School of Global Affairs at University of Toronto, and the University of California at Berkeley, said in a report released Friday. The Daily Beast obtained an advance copy of the document.

The Citizen Lab team concluded that it would be “trivial” to convert the Great Cannon from its censorship mission into a powerful system for injecting viruses, spyware, and other malicious code onto any foreign computer that communicates with a website in China, and that’s not protected with encryption.

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2015/04/10/revealed-china-s-cyberwar-cannon.html?via=mobile&source=twitter

Isn't it strange how I find these stories on pretty much any news site not named "The Intercept?" Now why would that be??

A little Friday wisdom for DUers from George Carlin:

"So I say live and let live. That's my motto: Live and let live. Anyone who can't go along with that, take 'em outside and shoot the motherfucker. It's a simple philosophy, but it's always worked in our family...."

(From Carlin on Campus, 1984)

Edward Snowden’s impact

A lot of readers have seen John Oliver’s amusing interview of Edward Snowden. If you haven’t seen it yet, it’s worth a watch. One of Oliver’s themes is that Snowden actually hasn’t had a major impact on American politics. Surveillance law is too complicated, Oliver suggests, and Snowden doesn’t have a simple message. But I think there are other reasons why Snowden hasn’t has a big impact on American public opinion — and also reasons that probably doesn’t matter for achieving Snowden’s goals. Here are some tentative thoughts on this big topic. I’ll hope to follow up later, with more firm views, in light of comments and responses.

I’ll begin with public opinion. Although the Snowden disclosures have impacted public opinion about government surveillance in some ways, they haven’t caused a major shift. Different polls are worded in different ways and suggest different things. But my overall sense is that public opinion has long been roughly evenly divided on U.S. government surveillance and continues to be roughly evenly divided post-Snowden. For example, in 2006, a poll on NSA surveillance suggested that 51% found NSA surveillance acceptable while 47% found it unacceptable. Shortly after the Snowden disclosures began, public opinion was equally divided about the Section 215 program. And just a few weeks ago, a Pew Research poll from last month found public opinion pretty evenly divided again:


Overall, 52% describe themselves as “very concerned” or “somewhat concerned” about government surveillance of Americans’ data and electronic communications, compared with 46% who describe themselves as “not very concerned” or “not at all concerned” about the surveillance.

The polling questions aren’t asking identical questions, so any conclusions have to be tentative. But on the whole, I don’t think the Snowden disclosures have caused a major shift in how the public thinks about national security surveillance.

The question is, why?

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/volokh-conspiracy/wp/2015/04/09/edward-snowdens-impact/

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A pretty solid, well-reasoned analysis...Of course most DUers will ignore or denigrate it just because they see my name next to the thread title...

Edward Snowden’s impact

A lot of readers have seen John Oliver’s amusing interview of Edward Snowden. If you haven’t seen it yet, it’s worth a watch. One of Oliver’s themes is that Snowden actually hasn’t had a major impact on American politics. Surveillance law is too complicated, Oliver suggests, and Snowden doesn’t have a simple message. But I think there are other reasons why Snowden hasn’t has a big impact on American public opinion — and also reasons that probably doesn’t matter for achieving Snowden’s goals. Here are some tentative thoughts on this big topic. I’ll hope to follow up later, with more firm views, in light of comments and responses.

I’ll begin with public opinion. Although the Snowden disclosures have impacted public opinion about government surveillance in some ways, they haven’t caused a major shift. Different polls are worded in different ways and suggest different things. But my overall sense is that public opinion has long been roughly evenly divided on U.S. government surveillance and continues to be roughly evenly divided post-Snowden. For example, in 2006, a poll on NSA surveillance suggested that 51% found NSA surveillance acceptable while 47% found it unacceptable. Shortly after the Snowden disclosures began, public opinion was equally divided about the Section 215 program. And just a few weeks ago, a Pew Research poll from last month found public opinion pretty evenly divided again:


Overall, 52% describe themselves as “very concerned” or “somewhat concerned” about government surveillance of Americans’ data and electronic communications, compared with 46% who describe themselves as “not very concerned” or “not at all concerned” about the surveillance.

The polling questions aren’t asking identical questions, so any conclusions have to be tentative. But on the whole, I don’t think the Snowden disclosures have caused a major shift in how the public thinks about national security surveillance.

The question is, why?

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/volokh-conspiracy/wp/2015/04/09/edward-snowdens-impact/
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