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Cooley Hurd

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Member since: 2002
Number of posts: 26,073

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The Rev has an Iraq War widow on, who was ALSO scammed by Trump U...

Cheryl Lankford. She is livid about Trump's Purple Heart stunt!

Poor woman...

Joy Reid knocks it out of the park again!

Right now, she has Malcolm Nance, General McCaffrey and Carl Paladino (Trump surrogate) on her show, and she is kicking Paladino's ass to the curb!!!!! Wish I could post the clip!

On edit: Paladino was saying disparaging things to Gen McCaffrey ("Where did HE get off the bus" after the General said Trump was a danger) and Joy said (paraphrase) "I won't let you disrespect a triple Purple Heart winner."

She then asked if the General if he chooses to respond, but also said it was okay if he didn't, since responding would dignify the comment from Paladino.

On edit: the clip! http://www.msnbc.com/am-joy/watch/security-experts-worry-about-trump-739398723509

Thanks Spitfire!

128 years ago today: Bertha Benz makes the first road trip

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bertha_Benz



Bertha Benz (née Ringer, 3 May 1849 – 5 May 1944) was a German automotive pioneer. She was the wife and business partner of automobile inventor Karl Benz. In 1888, she was the first person to drive an automobile over a long distance. In doing so, she brought the Benz Patent-Motorwagen worldwide attention and got the company its first sales.

In August 1888, without telling her husband and without permission of the authorities, Benz drove with her sons Richard and Eugen, thirteen and fifteen years old, in the newly constructed Patent Motorwagen automobile—from Mannheim to Pforzheim—becoming the first person to drive an automobile over a real distance. Motorized drives before this historic trip were merely very short trial drives, returning to the point of origin, made with mechanical assistants. Following wagon tracks, this pioneering tour had a one-way distance of about 106 km (66 mi).

Although the ostensible purpose of the trip was to visit her mother, Bertha Benz had other motives: to prove to her husband—who had failed to consider marketing his invention adequately—that the automobile they both heavily invested in would become a financial success once it was shown to be useful to the general public; and to give her husband the confidence that his constructions had a future.

She left Mannheim around dawn, solving numerous problems along the way. Bertha demonstrated her significant technical capabilities on this journey. With no fuel tank and only a 4.5-litre supply of petrol in the carburetor, she had to find ligroin, the petroleum solvent needed for the car to run. It was only available at apothecary shops, so she stopped in Wiesloch at the city pharmacy to purchase the fuel. At the time petrol and other fuels could only be bought from chemists and so this is how the chemist in Wiesloch became the first fuel station in the world.

She even cleaned a blocked fuel line with her hat pin and used her garter as isolation material. A blacksmith had to help mend a chain at one point. When the wooden brakes began to fail Benz visited a cobbler to install leather, making the world's first pair of brake pads. The thermosiphon system was employed to cool the engine, making water supply a big worry along the trip. The trio added water to their supply every time they stopped. The car's two gears were not enough to surmount uphill inclines and Eugen and Richard often had to push the vehicle. Benz reached Pforzheim somewhat after dusk, notifying her husband of her successful journey by telegram. She drove back to Mannheim several days later.

Along the way, several people were frightened by the automobile. Some even thought that two young boys and a woman on a hissing, thumping horseless carriage could only be the work of the Devil himself. The novel trip received a great deal of publicity, as she had sought. The drive was a key event in the technical development of the automobile. The pioneering couple introduced several improvements after Bertha's experiences. She reported everything that had happened along the way and made important suggestions, such as the introduction of an additional gear for climbing hills and brake linings to improve brake-power. Her trip proved to the burgeoning automotive industry that test drives were essential to their business.

</snip>


Watch Trump now... Are we seeing a meltdown?

He brings up NASA, completely out of context. Says NASA's failing and ties in employment. Segues into Secretary Clinton (who had nothing to do with either). My God.

Rubbing my eyes...

Chris Matthews is interviewing Ghazala and Khizr Khan now...

MSNBC

105 years ago today; Harriet Quimby is first female licensed pilot in the US

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harriet_Quimby



Harriet Quimby (May 11, 1875 – July 1, 1912) was an early American aviator and a movie screenwriter. In 1911, she was awarded a U.S. pilot's certificate by the Aero Club of America, becoming the first woman to gain a pilot's license in the United States. In 1912, she became the first woman to fly across the English Channel. Although Quimby lived only to the age of thirty-seven, she had a major influence upon the role of women in aviation.

Early life and early career

A historical marker has been erected near the now abandoned farmhouse in Arcadia Township, Manistee County, Michigan where Quimby was born. After her family moved to San Francisco, California, in the early 1900s, she became a journalist. She moved to New York City in 1903 to work as a theater critic for Leslie's Illustrated Weekly and more than 250 of her articles were published over a nine-year period.

Quimby became interested in aviation in 1910, when she attended the Belmont Park International Aviation Tournament on Long Island, New York and met John Moisant, a well-known aviator and operator of a flight school, and his sister Matilde. On August 1, 1911, she took her pilot's test and became the first U.S. woman to earn an Aero Club of America aviator's certificate. Matilde Moisant soon followed and became the nation's second certified female pilot.

<snip>

English Channel

On April 16, 1912, Quimby took off from Dover, England, en route to Calais, France and made the flight in 59 minutes, landing about 25 miles (40 km) from Calais on a beach in Équihen-Plage, Pas-de-Calais. She became the first woman to pilot an aircraft across the English Channel. Her accomplishment received little media attention, however, as the sinking of the RMS Titanic the day before consumed the interest of the public and filled newspapers.

Death

On July 1, 1912, she flew in the Third Annual Boston Aviation Meet at Squantum, Massachusetts. Ironically, although she had obtained her ACA certificate to be allowed to participate in ACA events, the Boston meet was an unsanctioned contest. Quimby flew out to Boston Light in Boston Harbor at about 3000 feet, then returned and circled the airfield. William Willard, the organizer of the event and father of the aviator Charles Willard, was a passenger in her brand-new two-seat Bleriot monoplane. At an altitude of 1,500 feet (460 m) the aircraft unexpectedly pitched forward for reasons still unknown. Both Willard and Quimby were ejected from their seats and fell to their deaths, while the plane "glided down and lodged itself in the mud".

Harriet Quimby was buried in the Woodlawn Cemetery in The Bronx, New York. The following year her remains were moved to the Kensico Cemetery in Valhalla, New York.

Legacy

The Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome possesses a flyable Anzani-powered one-seater Blériot XI, which bears the Blériot factory's serial number 56, showing that it was manufactured in 1909. Since Quimby's plane, in 1912, was a brand new two-seater, the idea that the former was the aircraft that she was flying in 1912 seems to be an urban legend.

A 1991 United States airmail postage stamp featured Quimby. She is memorialized in two official Michigan historical markers, one in Coldwater, and one at her birthplace in Manistee County. In 2012 Quimby was inducted into the Long Island Air and Space Hall of Fame.


A true pioneer!

The Russian hacks frighten me. How secure are our voting machines? Paging Andy Stephenson!

Our old friend, Andy, warned us of such a danger. I miss you, my friend.

http://archive.seattleweekly.com/2005-07-13/news/a-fight-to-the-end

Vigilance!!!!

The teenager who cradled RFK as he lay dying

This article's almost a year old, but I came across it and wanted to share.

http://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-0830-lopez-romero-20150829-column.html



In June, Juan Romero did something he hadn't done in decades. He celebrated his birthday, going out to dinner with his family in San Jose.

"I always dreaded when June was coming up," said Romero, 65, who has struggled for most of his adult life to let go of his crippling memory of an American tragedy.

It happened just after midnight on June 5, 1968. Robert F. Kennedy had won the California presidential primary and made his victory speech at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles, where Romero was a 17-year-old busboy.

A Roosevelt High School student who had moved north from Mexico at the age of 10, Romero recalled the photos of President John F. Kennedy that hung alongside those of Pope John XXIII in the homes of Mexican families.

<snip>

On each anniversary of RFK's death, Romero takes flowers to a memorial in downtown San Jose, where Kennedy delivered a speech during his winning primary run. Romero misses Kennedy, or at least what Kennedy seems to have represented as a statesman and presidential candidate. He misses him all the more in the midst of a current campaign in which the hottest topic is a proposal to build a higher wall between Mexico and the United States.

"He made me feel like a regular citizen," Romero says of the night he delivered room service to Kennedy. "He made me feel like a human being. He didn't look at my color, he didn't look at my position ... and like I tell everybody, he shook my hand. I didn't ask him."

Romero has always believed the best way to honor Kennedy is to live a life of tolerance, to work hard, to take care of family, and to not be a burden.

</snip>


Much more at the link...

Welcome to the DNC: Death. Taxes. Hillary - Stephen Colbert



My god... Brilliance!

MAD Magazine illustrator Jack Davis dies

http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/theater-arts/jack-davis-legendary-mad-magazine-ec-comics-artist-dead-91-article-1.2728531

Jack Davis, the iconic cartoonist who fleshed out the grisly horror titles at the heart of the ‘50s crusade against comics and humored the readers of Mad Magazine, has died, Athens, Georgia's WGAU radio reported.

He was 91.

</snip>

Davis eventually found even greater fame when he started contributing work for another of Gaines’ fledgling publications — a humor magazine called “Mad.” He contributed to the first 30 issues, and then returned in the mid ‘60s and became a mainstay for several decades.

His wacky doodlings couldn’t be contained on the page: Davis contributed a number of memorable movie posters to cinemas, including “American Graffiti,” “Animal House,” “It’s a Mad, Mad World” and Woody Allen’s “Bananas.”

</snip>


You know his art:



Cross gently, Jack, and THANK YOU!!!
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