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1monster

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Gender: Female
Home country: USA
Member since: 2002
Number of posts: 9,794

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Going to the movies and avoiding the crowds on July 4. Which one of these three

should we see? I wanted to see STAR TREK, but it is only showing in the early afternoon.

NOW YOU SEE ME



THE LONE RANGER



WHITE HOUSE DOWN

Scientists discover tiny solar panels that create themselves

https://www.dvice.com/archives/2010/09/scientists_disc.php

The researchers set out to create a synthetic process that imitates photosynthesis. Certain molecules respond to light by releasing electrons; the trick was discovering a substance that sticks them together in a consistent structure. Phospholipids do just that, and they also attach themselves to carbon nanotubes, which conduct electricity. With the nanotubes holding the phospholipids in a uniform alignment, the photoreactive molecules are all exposed to light at once, and the tube acts as a wire that then collects the resulting electrical current.

The most interesting part is that the tiny solar array can be disassembled and reassembled just by adding chemicals. Spray on an additive and the molecular components break apart into a soup; remove it with a membrane, and the system spontaneously puts itself together.

After repeatedly having the system go through disassembly and reassembly, the scientists found the system had no loss in efficiency. That could prove to be the best development of all, since losing efficiency over time can be a big problem with some solar systems. It all makes sense: if you want to build better solar panels, why not look for inspiration from the most successful solar-energy generators of all: plants.

Sweet smiling little baby fights sleep like a champion!

http://www.wimp.com/stayawake/

A summer joke for teachers...

Has Zimmerman's lawyer already cooked his case?

Especially given the prosecution's strong opeing statement.

Using the AIDS virus to kill cancer

UBUNTU



An anthropologist proposed a game to the kids in an African tribe. He put a basket full of fruit near a tree and told the kids that who ever got there first won the sweet fruits. When he told them to run they all took each other's hands and ran together, then sat together enjoying their treats. When he asked them why they had run like that as one could have had all the fruits for himself they said: "UBUNTU, how can one of us be happy if all the other ones are sad?"

'UBUNTU' in the Xhosa culture means: "I am because we are"

(from Wimp.com)

So, from now on, I invoke my Fifth Amendment rights at the beginning of any conversation

with law enforcement officers -- even if I've done nothing wrong or illegal...

http://reason.com/blog/2013/06/17/supreme-court-rules-fifth-amendment-has

Supreme Court Rules Fifth Amendment Has to Actually Be Invoked
Scott Shackford|Jun. 17, 2013 4:00 pm

In a 5-4 decision the Supreme Court ruled today that a potential defendant’s silence can be used against him if he is being interviewed by police but is not arrested (and read his Miranda rights) and has not verbally invoked the protection of the Fifth Amendment.

Tim Lynch at the Cato Institute explains that the Salinas v. Texas case was intended to be about whether prosecutors during a trial could cast aspersions on a defendant’s silence during questioning that took place prior to arrest — prior to the defendent being told he had the right to remain silent. Instead, the Supreme Court determined that they wouldn’t need to rule on the matter because the defendant had never invoked the Fifth Amendment’s protection. This decision means that it’s the responsibility of the individual to know about the protections offered by the Fifth Amendment even prior to arrest and to actually verbally invoke it:


The Court said Salinas simply remained silent and did not “formally” invoke any constitutional right, so prosecutors could offer commentary to the jury. What’s most disturbing about the ruling is its discussion of “burdens.” The plurality put the onus on the individual, not the government. That is the profound error in the decision. As the dissenters noted, in the circumstances of the case, it was evident what Salinas was doing. Unfortunately, the Supreme Court has complicated the law for persons who are the most vulnerable–persons who lack education, persons who do not speak English very well, persons who may suffer from mental problems, and persons who may be under the influence of alcohol. This is a bad day for the Bill of Rights.

Justice Stephen Breyer’s dissent notes that it should have been fairly clear that the defendant was invoking his Fifth Amendment right not to incriminate himself even if he didn’t use the words “Fifth Amendment”:


more at the link

Bill Maher’s HILARIOUS ‘Celebrity Confessions’ Signs! Parts 1 & 2



When words just aren't enough -- Say it with BACON!

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