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Bucky

Profile Information

Name: Mister Rea
Gender: Male
Hometown: Houston
Home country: Moon
Current location: afk
Member since: 2002
Number of posts: 42,460

About Me

I live in Houston, if you can call this living. I teach history to 11th graders. They don't appreciate my genius. I'm an active Democrat really only around election time (knock on doors, make a few phone calls, maybe donate a dollar or two if I think it'll do some good). I'm 48. I'm datin a real special gal right now, but if I don't watch my step I may have to edit out this sentence. I have pretensions toward being a director of performance art, although I've only put on one show (as of Dec 2011). I'm currently working on a second show. Our group is called Invisible Lines (www.invisiblelines.net). I mostly drink Shiner Bock beer because it's a mouth full of heaven. I'm a nut about George Washington, Martin Luther King Jr, and John Dewey. I've resisted for three years saying "I told ya so" about Barack Obama (but then again, I supported Biden in '08 so my room for complaining is minimal). That said, I'll certainly vote mediocre over evil any day of the week. I want Elizabeth Warren to run in 2016. And a pony. I totally want a pony.

Journal Archives

Moving here, soon as I find it

Etymology of "oo-rah"

from Oo-rah.com's "Origin of Oo-rh" page:
However, as it turns out, there appears to be some connection between the familiar battle cry of a Marine and the deep klaxon alarm of a submarine. According to several sources, including Lcpl Paul Hirseman (2004), writing for the Marine Corps website:

Marines and historians have determined the true origins of "Oorah" lie with recon Marines stationed in Korea in 1953. During this time, reconnaissance Marines in the 1st Amphibious Reconnaissance Co., found themselves traveling via submarine to where they were needed. The memorable call of "dive, dive!" would be called on the intercom and a klaxon alarm, which made a very distinct "Aarugha" sound, would announce the descent of the sub below water.

The recon Marines, who heard this sound often, started using it as a motivational tool during runs and physical training. Over time, the word "Aarugha" came to be too much of a mouthful, and eventually molded itself into the familiar "Oorah," according to Maj. Gary Marte, a retired Marine.

Having grown up as a Marine brat and being given the unique opportunity to watch my two older brothers join the Corps before me, I was well acquainted with the term before I joined. I originally thought it could only mean that the person saying it was highly motivated to be a Marine, as I heard it most often after the "Star Spangled Banner" finished playing before a movie at a base theater. Since then, I have seen it used as a replacement for "Aye, Aye," as a greeting, and to announce the presence of Marines, such as when the Corps is mentioned to a mixed audience. To further demonstrate the indefatigable utility of OO-RAH, I've compiled a top 10 list of possible meanings:

1. I am a Marine.
2. I enthusiastically accept your message.
3. I am excited to be here.
4. Pleased to make your acquaintance.
5. What you ask of me, not only will I do, I will do in a manner befitting a Marine.
6. I expect good things out of you.
7. Good job.
8. I am not supposed to be motivated about performing this task, but I will force myself to express excitement for the benefit of my fellow Marines and to tactfully annoy my superiors who gave me the task.
9. I love being a Marine.
10. I am about to destroy something.

Senior Citizen Texting Code



I'll need these in ten years (if we're still texting in 2022)

Try not to swoon, ladies...

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