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Samantha

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Member since: 2001
Number of posts: 7,235

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At this Current moment, perhaps we all need to discuss everyone's mistakes, right Mr. Hyatt?

By Current's own admission, it is Joel Hyatt who "guides" the network's development, production and programming content:

"Joel Hyatt, co-founder and Chief Executive Officer of Current Media, has guided the network's development since its inception, achieving recognition for the company's innovative approach to producing and programming content by and for its audience. Under Hyatt's leadership, Current TV has grown to 70 million subscriber households, expanded internationally, received two Emmy® Awards, the youngest network ever to win an Emmy, and won virtually every other journalistic award for outstanding investigative journalism."

http://current.com/s/management.htm

The following is a link to the Cain story as reported by The New York Times and referenced by Keith Olbermann with regard to recent events:

http://www.nytimes.com/1990/04/13/us/law-bar-lawyer-with-aids-wins-legal-victory-gives-his-employer-some-unwelcome.html

The article is very telling regarding the ethics of Joel Hyatt. Read it closely to see if you can spot plays in his approach to labor problem solving issues. Of special note is the Judge's remark that Hyatt had mounted a "corrupt assault on the defendant's dignity."

Additionally, here is the Internet address of The National Report article referencing Joel Hyatt's apology to Cain, saying he had made a mistake. A "mistake" -- that was his word? Think about this for a moment -- a corrupt assault on the dignity of a man dying of AIDS is referenced by Hyatt in his apology as a "mistake." That was a tragedy of almost incomprehensible cruelty, but his apology only came after the judge hearing the case found in favor of Mr. Cain. The opinion was extremely rapidly issued since by that moment, Cain's passing was imminent.

http://books.google.com/books?id=usADAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA55&lpg=PA55&dq=National+Report+Philadelphia+Story+similar+Cain&source=bl&ots=aRtC6oNEbT&sig=wjDprpv-1ivVy6OLA1BkKZVE23I&hl=en&sa=X&ei=Hpd3T7nAC-P40gGEsIGwDQ&sqi=2&ved=0CCAQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=National%20Report%20Philadelphia%20Story%20similar%20Cain&f=false

Hyatt, himself an attorney, apparently does remember the playbook for discarding employees he finds too expensive to keep.

It seems only fair if negative comments about Keith Olbermann's relationships with his co-workers are going to come into the wash of his departure from Current, we must take a look at everyone's dirty laundry who is connected to this matter. Keith Olbermann called his decision to join Current a mistake, but his mistake compared to the admitted mistake in Joel Hyatt's history with regard to the late Mr. Cain is infinitesimal. Hyatt's will be remembered as long as the movie Philadelphia remains imprinted on the brains of those who have watched this movie.

I have nothing but the highest regard for Al Gore. He is a national treasure. I have followed him since he was in Congress and give him my greatest respect. Additionally, I treasure Keith Olbermann. During the Bush* years, Keith Olbermann helped me retain my sanity by publicly holding Bush* accountable for his appalling conduct in the Oval Office. Olbermann did this knowing he was putting his job at risk, but that didn't stop him. To Keith Olbermann, his credibility as a journalist was more important than his career. That is indeed a rarity in journalists.

As is often said, reasonable people can disagree on issues. I see absolutely no reason not to keep that thought in mind as the mudslinging against Keith Olbermann erupts into the public domain.

Sam

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